Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (01)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (05)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (04)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Critical Race Theory, Law, and Criminal Justice
AS.191.303 (01)

In this course, students will gain a foundational understanding of critical race theory, including its genesis in legal theory. The course will examine its relationship and importance to social movements, including through key concepts like intersectionality. The course will also use critical race theory to grapple with law and the criminal justice system in the United States.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): POLI-AP, POLI-PT, INST-AP, INST-PT, SPOL-UL

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (02)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (06)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (07)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Issues in International Development
AS.230.150 (01)

Why do billions of people continue to live in poverty? What obstacles stand in the way of secure and dignified lives for all? Who is most likely to bring about change, what strategies should they follow, and what kinds of institutions should they put in place? This course will introduce the main theoretical perspectives, debates, and themes in the field of international development since the mid-20th century. It has three sections. The first section focuses on debates over the optimal conditions and strategies for generating economic growth and on the relationship between growth, human welfare, and inequality. The second section presents critical assessments of development interventions from various perspectives. The third section considers the role of social movements in shaping development and social change in the 21st century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 7/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Research Tools for Global Sociology and Development
AS.230.265 (01)

This course will introduce students to a range of software programs that are critical for conducting social scientific research in the 21st century. Students will develop competency in the use of computer programs for statistical analysis, database management, the creation of maps and timelines, and the presentation of research reports. The course uses examples from ongoing social science faculty research projects at Johns Hopkins on global inequality and international development. Required for GSCD track students. Course previously titled "Research Tools and Technologies for the Social Sciences"

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (03)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (08)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Freshman Seminar: Public Opinion and Democracy
AS.230.224 (01)

How does public opinion shape electoral behavior and democratic governance, and how have these relationships evolved as techniques for measuring public opinion have developed since the 1950s? After a consideration of models of effective democratic governance, the course will consider how public opinion is measured and interpreted in the United States by private pollsters, university-based survey researchers, and data journalists. The course will consider competing perspectives on the sources of variation within mass public opinion, such as social class membership, racial and gender identity, religious affiliation, and party identification. Throughout the course, emphasis is placed upon the alternative modes of inquiry and writing that opposing analysts adopt. Students will learn to interpret and write about public opinion patterns from these perspectives.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Social Theory
AS.230.213 (01)

This course will focus on three classical theorists whose ideas have greatly influenced the ways we study society: Karl Marx, Max Weber, and Emile Durkheim. The course is devoted to understanding how each theorist understood the origin, structure and historical dynamics of modern societies. In addition to comparing their theories, we will use them to analyze current social issues, including those involving social inequality, conflict, cohesion, and change.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

Global Social Change and Development Practicum
AS.230.325 (01)

This course provides "hands on" research experience in the field of global social change and development. The course fulfills the "research practicum" requirement for Sociology majors and is required for the GSCD track.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Chinese Diaspora: Networks and Identity
AS.230.352 (01)

This course combines lecture and class discussion. It examines the history and historiography of Chinese overseas migration. Major issues include overseas Chinese as “merchants without empire,” Chinese exclusion acts in the age of mass migration, the “Chinese question” in postcolonial Southeast Asia, as well as the making and unmaking of Chinese identity in the current wave of globalization.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP

Sociology of Health and Illness
AS.230.341 (02)

This course introduces students to core concepts that define the sociological approach to health, illness and health care. Topics include: health disparities, social context of health and illness, and the Sociology of Medicine.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL

Plagues, Power, and Social Control
AS.230.306 (01)

While developments in biomedicine and health care have led to the eradication, cure and management of many human health problems, disease, illness and health have also been the focus for aggressive social controls and population management. The technologies and practices of disease control and health management have been foundational to some of the most aggressive structures of oppression in recent history such as the Jewish Ghetto, the Concentration Camp, the South African Township and techniques of segregation. This course seeks to explore how epidemics and disease control are linked to larger questions of power, state craft and international dynamics. This course asks how have outbreaks of infectious disease shaped social and political action? How do societies respond to outbreaks and why? What do epidemic moments tell us about global structures of power and the dynamics of control? Drawing on historical cases including plague during the European Renaissance and before, the HIV/AIDS Pandemic and the West African Ebola Outbreak of 2013-2016, this course will introduce students to the history and practices of disease control as well as important theoretical perspectives by which to understand the sociological and historical effects of disease and the responses to them. Students will engage sociological concepts such as biopolitics, social construction of disease and illness and biosecurity and produce a final research paper examining the outcomes and responses to an epidemic event to show mastery of the topics covered in the course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Quantitative Research Practicum
AS.230.322 (01)

This course provides “hands on” research experience applying sociological research tools and a sociological perspective to problems of substance. Quantitative methods will be emphasized, as applied to census data, survey data and/or archival data. Students will design and carry out a research project and write a research report. Juniors and seniors only. Sophomores require instructor's permission. Recommended Course Background: AS.230.205, AS.230.202

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Capitalism, Dependency, and Development in Latin America
AS.230.350 (01)

This course examines Latin American insertion into the global capitalist economy from the colonial period to the present. Examining various historical, sociological, and political-economic theories, this course will ask not only how Latin American economies and societies have developed their particular characteristics, but also how theorists within and outside the region have understood Latin American development over time. development over time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP

Medical Humanitarianism
AS.230.335 (01)

Humanitarian organizations play life-preserving roles in global conflicts, and have front-row views of disasters ranging from the 2010 Haiti earthquake to the 2011 Fukushima tsunami in Japan. Yet even while they provide vital assistance to millions of people in crisis, such organizations are beset by important paradoxes that hinder their capacity to create sustainable interventions. They work to fill long-lasting needs, but are prone to moving quickly from one site to the next in search of the latest emergency. They strive to be apolitical, yet are invariably influenced by the geopolitical agendas of global powers. How do such contradictions arise, and what is their impact upon millions of aid recipients around the world? Drawing on case studies from South Sudan to Haiti, this course addresses these contradictions by exploring how and why medical aid organizations attempt, and sometimes fail, to reconcile short-term goals, such as immediate life-saving, with long-term missions, such as public health programs and conflict resolution initiatives.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, MSCH-HUM

Sociology of Health and Illness
AS.230.341 (04)

This course introduces students to core concepts that define the sociological approach to health, illness and health care. Topics include: health disparities, social context of health and illness, and the Sociology of Medicine.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL

Sociology of Fascism: Past and Present
AS.230.360 (01)

The recent rise of extreme right-wing discourse, social movements and political parties both in the United States and across the Atlantic has spurred debate on whether we are witnessing a come-back of fascist or para-fascist politics. This course will address the following questions: What is fascism? What are the social, economic, political conditions that brought right-wing authoritarianism to dominate European politics in the interwar period? What was the fulcrum of fascist politics? Does the concept of fascism help us to understand the current historical conjuncture? Is fascism coming back? The first half of this course aims at unpacking the concept of fascism through a historical itinerary across its variants in different times and countries. By looking at fascism in its different historical articulations, students will explore the social and ideological underpinnings of fascism and will be pushed to get at the essence of fascist politics – assuming there is a unifying thread across cases. Once students have acquired the theoretical and historical tools to think analytically about the social, political, economic and cultural politics of fascism, we will move to discussing current forms of right wing populism. The second half of the course will thus focus on identifying similarities and differences between the present and historical forms of authoritarianism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/13
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

African American Family
AS.230.316 (01)

This course is an examination of sociological theories and studies of African-American families and an overview of the major issues confronting African-American family life. The contemporary conditions of black families are explored, as well as the historical events that have influenced the family patterns we currently observe. Special attention will be given to social policies that have evolved as a result of the prominence of any one perspective at a given point in time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, SPOL-UL

Housing and Homelessness in the United States
AS.230.370 (01)

This course will examine the role of housing, or the absence thereof, in shaping quality of life. It will explore the consequences of the places in which we live and how we are housed. Consideration will be given to overcrowding, affordability, accessibility, and past and existing housing policies and their influence on society. Special attention will be given to the problem of homelessness.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, SPOL-UL

Undergraduate Research Seminar
AS.230.379 (01)

Seminar for Sociology students writing senior honor theses and conducting pre-approved independent research projects. Juniors and Seniors Sociology majors only. Permission of instructor.

  • Credits: 2.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 3/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Sociology of Health and Illness
AS.230.341 (01)

This course introduces students to core concepts that define the sociological approach to health, illness and health care. Topics include: health disparities, social context of health and illness, and the Sociology of Medicine.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL

Baltimore and Beyond
AS.230.357 (01)

This course uses the city of Baltimore as a lens through which to explore issues of urban inequality. We will focus on Baltimore's history of racial segregation and concentrated poverty, and its effect on the social and economic well-being of the city and its residents, with attention to education, employment, health and crime. Students will learn how to employ Census data, GIS approaches, and sociological research to inform questions about population change, inequality and the distribution of resources across the city and metropolitan region. Students will also work on one or more policy relevant studies based in Baltimore, including: a project on abandoned and vacant housing, a desegregation intervention, and a longitudinal study of inner city youth. Finally, students will become familiar with Baltimore City's programs and policy approaches to addressing the city's most pressing problems, and will design innovative and effective and innovative solutions as part of their course assignments. Enrollment restricted to Social Policy minors only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): SPOL-UL

Refugees, Human Rights, and Sovereignty
AS.230.378 (01)

What is a refugee? Since World War II, states that have pledged to offer protection to refugees have frequently been drawn instead to the dictates of nationalism and communitarianism, which prioritize concern for their own citizens, rather than to the needs of forced migrants. As a result, even those migrants that have been formally recognized as refugees according to the 1951 UN Refugee Convention have not been assured of protection, and other migrants have been even less assured. In this course, we will locate the reasons for this reality in the legal, political, and historical underpinnings of political asylum. What is the difference between an asylum seeker and a refugee? How has the refugee category been redefined and contested by international bodies since 1951? How are the ambiguities of real-life violence and persecution simplified in asylum adjudication interviews that require clear, factual narratives? What kinds of protections are offered to asylum seekers, whether by UN bodies, NGOs, or host governments, and how have such protections varied geographically and historically? Finally, what protections, if any, are afforded to those migrants who are fleeing not persecution but rather “merely” endemic poverty or climate-induced displacement? The course draws on literature from sociology, history, anthropology, and international refugee law in order to understand the capacity (or lack thereof) of human rights discourses and declarations to contravene state sovereignty in the name of protecting the rightless.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Sociology of Health and Illness
AS.230.341 (03)

This course introduces students to core concepts that define the sociological approach to health, illness and health care. Topics include: health disparities, social context of health and illness, and the Sociology of Medicine.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL

Politics and Society
AS.230.396 (01)

This seminar surveys key problems of political sociology including the rise of the modern state, the origins and nature of liberal democracy, sources of authority, the relationship between political and economic power, the nation-state and nationalism, states and war, ideology and political contention, collective identity, social movements, and social revolutions. Fulfills Comparative Politics for International Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/8
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, INST-CP

Global Health and Human Rights
AS.230.393 (01)

Is access to healthcare a fundamental human right? If so, then which global actors are obligated to provide healthcare to whom, and for how long? How do meanings of health and illness vary across time and place? And finally, how are human rights principles translated into frontline practice in order to promote well-being? This course takes a critical interdisciplinary approach to these questions through a series of global case studies ranging from humanitarian aid in post-tsunami Sri Lanka to anti-FGM (female genital mutilation) campaigns in Ghana. How do international NGOs, UN bodies, and governments collaborate (or compete) to distribute healthcare in places beset by dire resource shortages? Do human rights principles carry legal weight across borders, and if so, could access to healthcare services and essential medicines be litigated in order to compel governments to provide it? And finally, what cultural assumptions do human rights discourses carry with them, and what happens if rights-based approaches are poorly received by recipient populations? Moving beyond the basic principle of healthcare as a human right, this course aims to bring this idea’s history and politics into focus by offering an in-depth exploration of its ethics and implementation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Police and Prisons in Comparative Perspective
AS.362.113 (01)

Course description: (modified slightly) This introductory course will examine policing and prisons in the United States and beyond, with a focus on racial inequality. It will consist of three parts. First, we will define key concepts in police and prison studies. Then, we will explore the contemporary state of prisons and policing in the United States and look at debates around the rise of “mass incarceration” and aggressive forms of policing in the final third of the 20th century. Third, we will explore policing and prison in other parts of the globe in the contemporary moment, highlighting similarities and differences from the U.S. case. What can studying the instruments of social control in other societies reveal about our own? Students will develop an understanding of major trends, keywords, and debates in the literature on policing and prisons, with particular reference to race and racism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-AP

Development and Social Change in Rural China
AS.310.340 (01)

This course will survey the major issues of development and social change in rural China since 1950s. These issues will be addressed in chronological order. They include land ownership and land grabbing, organization of rural economic, political, and social life, rural elections and village governance, development strategies, urban-rural relationship in resource allocation, rural modernization strategies in regard to irrigation, clean drinking water, electricity supply, hard paved road, education and rural medical service, women’s rights and family life, rural consumption, and etc. This course will prepare students, both empirically and analytically, to understand what happened in rural China from 1949 to the present, and how we can engage in policy and theoretical discussions based on what we learn.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP

The Political Economy of Drugs and Drug Wars
AS.230.397 (01)

In the United States, we spend more than $100 billion annually on illegal drugs—and the government spends more than $50 billion a year to combat their sale and use. These statistics raise important and complicated social questions. This course will examine the production, sale, use, and control of illegal drugs from a historical and sociological perspective. We will have three objectives: to understand the social construction of drug use and illegality in the United States and other rich countries; to uncover the political and economic consequences of drug trafficking in those countries that produce drugs, particularly in Latin America; and to examine the political economy of drug control through the so-called War on Drugs, both domestically and internationally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/16
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Port Cities and Historical Capitalism in Maritime Asia
AS.230.440 (01)

The goal of the seminar is to examine the prospects and limits of understanding the incorporation of Asia in the capitalist world-system from the prism of oceanic connections. The theoretical thrust of this course is to develop but also to adapt Janet Abu-Lughod emphasis on the connections across port cities and littoral in the Afro-Eurasian continents before the long sixteenth century in her Before European Hegemony. But instead of looking at a port city as its adjacent hinterland polity’s gateway to global trade in the premodern era, the course examines the multifarious coast-hinterland relationships. The readings are organized by a chronological order, which begins with the historical maritime silk road between the third and thirteenth centuries, and will be followed by Asian port cities in the European age of empire and postwar American-led Cold War Structure, as well as the present-day Chinese New Silk Road Diplomacy. Students are expected to select an issue of regional tensions and to analyze its historical root.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Chinese Politics and Society
AS.310.230 (01)

This introductory course will familiarize students with the major dynamics of political and social change in contemporary China since 1949. The course will be divided chronologically into four main topics: 1. The contested processes of nation-state making in modern China before 1949; 2. The making of the socialist system during the Mao Years and its dismantling since 1978; 3. The Reform Era transformation to a market economy with Chinese characteristics; 4. The dynamic relationships among the state, market and society since the new millennium. Students will explore how scholars have explained major political and social changes with reference to individual and collective rationalities, specific organizational and institutional arrangements, and specific strategic and cultural mechanisms of Chinese political and social habits.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.230.101 (01)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMCherlin, Andrew JMaryland 110
AS.230.101 (05)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMCherlin, Andrew JMaryland 110
AS.230.101 (04)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMCherlin, Andrew JMaryland 110
AS.191.303 (01)Critical Race Theory, Law, and Criminal JusticeTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMSchrader, Stuart LaurenceGilman 400POLI-AP, POLI-PT, INST-AP, INST-PT, SPOL-UL
AS.230.101 (02)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMCherlin, Andrew JMaryland 110
AS.230.101 (06)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMCherlin, Andrew JMaryland 110
AS.230.101 (07)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMCherlin, Andrew JMaryland 110
AS.230.150 (01)Issues in International DevelopmentTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMDong, YigeHodson 301
AS.230.265 (01)Research Tools for Global Sociology and DevelopmentMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMKang, MinhyoungKrieger 108
AS.230.101 (03)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMCherlin, Andrew JMaryland 110
AS.230.101 (08)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMCherlin, Andrew JMaryland 110
AS.230.224 (01)Freshman Seminar: Public Opinion and DemocracyW 3:00PM - 5:30PMMorgan, Stephen LGilman 413INST-AP
AS.230.213 (01)Social TheoryTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMAndreas, JoelHodson 315INST-PT
AS.230.325 (01)Global Social Change and Development PracticumWF 3:00PM - 4:15PMSilver, Beverly JudithMergenthaler 526
AS.230.352 (01)Chinese Diaspora: Networks and IdentityTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKuo, Huei-YingCroft Hall G02INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP
AS.230.341 (02)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PMAgree, EmilyMergenthaler 111PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL
AS.230.306 (01)Plagues, Power, and Social ControlT 3:00PM - 5:30PMWhite, AlexandreGilman 10INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.230.322 (01)Quantitative Research PracticumTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMBurdick-Will, JuliaKrieger 108
AS.230.350 (01)Capitalism, Dependency, and Development in Latin AmericaT 3:00PM - 5:30PMThornton, ChristyOlin 305INST-ECON, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP
AS.230.335 (01)Medical HumanitarianismMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMNaveh Benjamin, IlilGilman 377INST-IR, MSCH-HUM
AS.230.341 (04)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PMAgree, EmilyMergenthaler 111PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL
AS.230.360 (01)Sociology of Fascism: Past and PresentTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMDallona, ValentinaShriver Hall Board RoomINST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.230.316 (01)African American FamilyTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMMcDonald, Katrina BellGilman 413INST-AP, SPOL-UL
AS.230.370 (01)Housing and Homelessness in the United StatesTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMGreif, MeredithKrieger 304INST-AP, SPOL-UL
AS.230.379 (01)Undergraduate Research SeminarW 4:30PM - 6:10PMJacobs, Ricado EduardMergenthaler 526
AS.230.341 (01)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PMAgree, EmilyMergenthaler 111PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL
AS.230.357 (01)Baltimore and BeyondT 4:00PM - 6:30PMDeluca, StefanieAbel Wolman House 100SPOL-UL
AS.230.378 (01)Refugees, Human Rights, and SovereigntyTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMNaveh Benjamin, IlilKrieger 302INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.230.341 (03)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PMAgree, EmilyMergenthaler 111PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL
AS.230.396 (01)Politics and SocietyTh 3:00PM - 5:30PMAndreas, JoelMergenthaler 526INST-PT, INST-CP
AS.230.393 (01)Global Health and Human RightsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMNaveh Benjamin, IlilGilman 400INST-IR
AS.362.113 (01)Police and Prisons in Comparative PerspectiveTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMSchrader, Stuart LaurenceShaffer 100INST-CP, INST-AP
AS.310.340 (01)Development and Social Change in Rural ChinaW 3:00PM - 5:30PMHe, GaochaoCroft Hall B32INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP
AS.230.397 (01)The Political Economy of Drugs and Drug WarsMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMThornton, ChristyLatrobe 120INST-ECON, INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.230.440 (01)Port Cities and Historical Capitalism in Maritime AsiaM 1:30PM - 4:00PMKuo, Huei-YingWolman MPRINST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.310.230 (01)Chinese Politics and SocietyTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMHe, GaochaoSmokler Center 213INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST