Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Medical Humanitarianism
AS.230.335 (21)

Humanitarian organizations play life-preserving roles in global conflicts, and have front-row views of disasters ranging from the 2010 Haiti earthquake to the 2011 Fukushima tsunami in Japan. Yet even while they provide vital assistance to millions of people in crisis, such organizations are beset by important paradoxes that hinder their capacity to create sustainable interventions. They work to fill long-lasting needs, but are prone to moving quickly from one site to the next in search of the latest emergency. They strive to be apolitical, yet are invariably influenced by the geopolitical agendas of global powers. How do such contradictions arise, and what is their impact upon millions of aid recipients around the world? Drawing on case studies from South Sudan to Haiti, this course addresses these contradictions by exploring how and why medical aid organizations attempt, and sometimes fail, to reconcile short-term goals, such as immediate life-saving, with long-term missions, such as public health programs and conflict resolution initiatives.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 1:00PM - 3:30PM
  • Instructor: Naveh Benjamin, Ilil
  • Room: Mergenthaler 526
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (87)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor: Reese, Michael Joseph, Jr.
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/48
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.230.335 (21)Medical HumanitarianismMWF 1:00PM - 3:30PMNaveh Benjamin, IlilMergenthaler 526INST-IR
AS.230.101 (87)Introduction to SociologyReese, Michael Joseph, Jr. 

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Race and Ethnic Politics in the United States
AS.190.437 (01)

Race has been and continues to be centrally important to American political life and development. In this course, we will engage with the major debates around racial politics in the United States, with a substantial focus on how policies and practices of citizenship, immigration law, social provision, and criminal justice policy shaped and continue to shape racial formation, group-based identities, and group position; debates around the content and meaning of political representation and the responsiveness of the political system to American minority groups; debates about how racial prejudice has shifted and its importance in understanding American political behavior; the prospects for contestation or coalitions among groups; the “struggle with difference” within groups as they deal with the interplay of race and class, citizenship status, and issues that disproportionately affect a subset of their members; and debates about how new groups and issues are reshaping the meaning and practice of race in the United States.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Weaver, Vesla
  • Room: Mattin Center 162
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Issues in International Development
AS.230.150 (02)

Why do billions of people continue to live in poverty? What obstacles stand in the way of secure and dignified lives for all? Who is most likely to bring about change, what strategies should they follow, and what kinds of institutions should they put in place? This course will introduce the main theoretical perspectives, debates, and themes in the field of international development since the mid-20th century. It has three sections. The first section focuses on debates over the optimal conditions and strategies for generating economic growth and on the relationship between growth, human welfare, and inequality. The second section presents critical assessments of development interventions from various perspectives. The third section considers the role of social movements in shaping development and social change in the 21st century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Levien, Michael
  • Room: Hodson 213
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/50
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI, INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON, ENVS-MAJOR

Freshman Seminar: Gender, Health and Aging
AS.230.154 (01)

In this course students will develop an understanding of the ways in which gender structures health and well being through adulthood and later life. The experience of sexual minorities and the ntersection of gender with class and ethnicity will also be discussed. Students will be expected to participate actively and lead discussions on specific topics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Agree, Emily
  • Room: Gilman 277
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Inequality and Social Change in Contemporary China
AS.230.233 (01)

This course examines the trajectory of economic development in China since the beginning of market reforms in the late 1970s, with a special focus on social inequality and forms of resistance that have emerged in response to the expansion of the market economy. The first part of the course focuses on understanding the academic debates around China’s economic miracle and introduces students to theories about the relationship between market expansion and social resistance. The second part focuses on key thematic topics including the rural/urban divide, rural protest, urban inequality and labor unrest, gender and sexuality in social movements, environmental protests, and the politics of ethnic relations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Liang, Guowei
  • Room: Smokler Center 301
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Research Tools for Global Sociology and Development
AS.230.265 (01)

This course will introduce students to a range of software programs that are critical for conducting social scientific research in the 21st century. Students will develop competency in the use of computer programs for statistical analysis, database management, the creation of maps and timelines, and the presentation of research reports. The course uses examples from ongoing social science faculty research projects at Johns Hopkins on global inequality and international development. Required for GSCD track students. Course previously titled "Research Tools and Technologies for the Social Sciences"

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Race and Ethnicity in American Society
AS.230.244 (01)

Race and ethnicity have played a prominent role in American society and continue to do so, as demonstrated by interracial and interethnic gaps in economic and educational achievement, residence, political power, family structure, crime, and health. Using a sociological framework, we will explore the historical significance of race and its development as a social construction, assess the causes and consequences of intergroup inequalities and explore potential solutions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Greif, Meredith
  • Room: Bloomberg 172
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, SPOL-UL

Social Theory
AS.230.213 (01)

This course will focus on four classical theorists whose ideas have greatly influenced the ways we study society: Karl Marx, Max Weber, Emile Durkheim, and W. E. B. Du Bois. The course is devoted to understanding how each theorist understood the origin, structure, and historical dynamics of modern societies. In addition to comparing their theories, we will use them to analyze current social issues, including those involving social inequality, conflict, cohesion, and change.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Schrader, Stuart Laurence
  • Room: Gilman 219
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, GECS-SOCSCI

Chinese Revolutions
AS.230.175 (01)

This course introduces the origins, operation and impacts of five major revolutions in modern China between 1850 and 1950. These include the Taiping Rebellion, the republican revolutions, federalist and southern automatic movements, labor strikes as well as peasant rebellions. It draws on the existing historiography that examines China’s transition from an empire to a republic, impacts of western and Japanese influences to China, as well as the continuity and change of Chinese social organizations. Cross list with International Studies and East Asian Studies. Fulfills IS History requirement.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Kuo, Huei-Ying
  • Room: Gilman 134
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-NWHIST, INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Introduction to Social Statistics
AS.230.205 (01)

This course will introduce students to the application of statistical techniques commonly used in sociological analysis. Topics include measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability theory, confidence intervals, chi-square, anova, and regression analysis. Hands-on computer experience with statistical software and analysis of data from various fields of social research. Special Note: Required for IS GSCD track students.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Reese, Michael Joseph, Jr.
  • Room: Bloomberg 176
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Social Statistics
AS.230.205 (02)

This course will introduce students to the application of statistical techniques commonly used in sociological analysis. Topics include measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability theory, confidence intervals, chi-square, anova, and regression analysis. Hands-on computer experience with statistical software and analysis of data from various fields of social research. Special Note: Required for IS GSCD track students.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Reese, Michael Joseph, Jr.
  • Room: Bloomberg 176
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Society in the Anthropocene
AS.230.348 (01)

If the progressive domination of nature has been the overriding ideology of modern societies, extreme weather events and now the Covid-19 pandemic have underscored the tenuousness of that domination. The pandemic has quickly put extreme stress on a variety of social institutions, realizing dystopian scenarios previously imagined by science fiction writers and apocalyptic climate change thinkers. While addressing the unfolding Covid-19 crisis, this course will place it within a broader set of concerns around climate change and what some call the Anthropocene—the era in which human activity has become the dominant influence on the Earth’s climate and environment. We will survey a range of social scientific literature—combined with journalistic and popular sources—on the social origins of ‘natural’ disasters; the ways in which social phenomenon—institutions, ideologies, poverty, inequality, racism, nationalism, anomie and politics—affect and are affected by such disasters; and the different ways in which various social factors—states, investors, social movements and sub-cultures—prepare for the coming crises of the 21st century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Levien, Michael
  • Room: Mattin Center 160
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Global Social Change and Development Practicum
AS.230.325 (01)

This course provides "hands on" research experience in the field of global social change and development. The course fulfills the "research practicum" requirement for Sociology majors and is required for the GSCD track.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Silver, Beverly Judith
  • Room: Hodson 311
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Sociology of Health and Illness
AS.230.341 (03)

This course introduces students to medical sociology, which is the application of the sociological perspective to health and health care. Major topics include stress, social epidemiology, and the social organization of health care.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PM
  • Instructor: Agree, Emily
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL, MSCH-HUM

Social Statistics
AS.230.394 (02)

The application of statistical techniques commonly used in sociological analysis. Topics include measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability theory, confidence intervals, chi-square, anova, and regression analysis. Hands-on computer experience with statistical software and analysis of data from various fields of social research.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Reese, Michael Joseph, Jr.
  • Room: Bloomberg 176
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 1/2
  • PosTag(s): n/a

State and Society in Modern India
AS.230.318 (01)

This course examines the complex, at times conflicting, relationship that has emerged between Indian seats of power from above and Indian expressions of society from below. Attention will be placed on the period between 1947 to the present.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Agarwala, Rina
  • Room: Hodson 316
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Refugees, Human Rights, and Sovereignty
AS.230.378 (01)

What is a refugee? Since World War II, states that have pledged to offer protection to refugees have frequently been drawn instead to the dictates of nationalism and communitarianism, which prioritize concern for their own citizens, rather than to the needs of forced migrants. As a result, even those migrants that have been formally recognized as refugees according to the 1951 UN Refugee Convention have not been assured of protection, and other migrants have been even less assured. In this course, we will locate the reasons for this reality in the legal, political, and historical underpinnings of political asylum. What is the difference between an asylum seeker and a refugee? How has the refugee category been redefined and contested by international bodies since 1951? How are the ambiguities of real-life violence and persecution simplified in asylum adjudication interviews that require clear, factual narratives? What kinds of protections are offered to asylum seekers, whether by UN bodies, NGOs, or host governments, and how have such protections varied geographically and historically? Finally, what protections, if any, are afforded to those migrants who are fleeing not persecution but rather “merely” endemic poverty or climate-induced displacement? The course draws on literature from sociology, history, anthropology, and international refugee law in order to understand the capacity (or lack thereof) of human rights discourses and declarations to contravene state sovereignty in the name of protecting the rightless.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Naveh Benjamin, Ilil
  • Room: Krieger 300
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL

Sociology of Health and Illness
AS.230.341 (02)

This course introduces students to medical sociology, which is the application of the sociological perspective to health and health care. Major topics include stress, social epidemiology, and the social organization of health care.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Agree, Emily
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL, MSCH-HUM

(Making Space For) Black Thought
AS.230.304 (01)

How do we think about the power relations at work in the scholarship we read and in the important texts we consider essential to our educational experience? This course will critically investigate the role that concepts of race and racism have played in formulating dominant perceptions of who can be the producers of knowledge and what constitutes authoritative knowledge itself. We will consider how and why thinkers and scholarship produced outside of Europe and North America are too often ignored for their scholarly contributions and the dynamics that lead to this situation. We will also explore how and why new and important perspectives emerge from engaging and centering voices from beyond traditional canonical works. With a particular focus on the forms of knowledge arising from European Enlightenment approaches to concepts of thought reason and objective knowledge, this course will critically engage students with a wide range of thinkers such asGWF Hegel, W.E.B. Du Bois, Angela Davis, Ralph Trouillot, Sadiya Hartman, Walter Rodney, Derek Walcott, Sylvia Wynter and Frantz Fanon. This course will focus largely on thinkers engaging within the Black Atlantic and black diaspora traditions to question how we might consider voices and thought from beyond Eurocentric positions in our own scholarly practice.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: White, Alexandre Ilani Rein
  • Room: Maryland 104
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

Medical Humanitarianism
AS.230.335 (01)

Humanitarian organizations play life-preserving roles in global conflicts, and have front-row views of disasters ranging from the 2010 Haiti earthquake to the 2011 Fukushima tsunami in Japan. Yet even while they provide vital assistance to millions of people in crisis, such organizations are beset by important paradoxes that hinder their capacity to create sustainable interventions. They work to fill long-lasting needs, but are prone to moving quickly from one site to the next in search of the latest emergency. They strive to be apolitical, yet are invariably influenced by the geopolitical agendas of global powers. How do such contradictions arise, and what is their impact upon millions of aid recipients around the world? Drawing on case studies from South Sudan to Haiti, this course addresses these contradictions by exploring how and why medical aid organizations attempt, and sometimes fail, to reconcile short-term goals, such as immediate life-saving, with long-term missions, such as public health programs and conflict resolution initiatives.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Naveh Benjamin, Ilil
  • Room: Shriver Hall 104
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, MSCH-HUM

Undergraduate Research Seminar
AS.230.379 (01)

Seminar for Sociology students writing senior honor theses and conducting pre-approved independent research projects. Juniors and Seniors Sociology majors only. Permission of instructor.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor: Andreas, Joel
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/8
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Education & Society
AS.230.312 (01)

This course analyzes educational systems as social institutions and organizations. It gives particular attention to the often taken-for-granted ways that we structure learning in schools and their consequences for social inequality. To these ends, the course will examine classical institutional and organizational theory in sociology and evaluate these theories in their application to historical process of educational formation and the contemporary organization of K-12 schooling in the US.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Burdick-Will, Julia
  • Room: Gilman 75
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Social Policy: Baltimore and Beyond
AS.360.247 (02)

This course will introduce students to basic concepts in economics, political science and sociology relevant to the study of social problems and the programs designed to remedy them. It will address the many inequalities in access to education and health care, unequal treatment in the criminal justice system, disparities in income and wealth, and differential access to political power. The focus will be on designing effective policies at the national and local level to address these pressing issues. This course is open to all students, but will be required for the new Social Policy Minor. The course is also recommended for students who are interested in law school, medical school, programs in public health, and graduate school in related social science fields. This course does not count as one of the required courses for the Economics major or minor, but it is required for the Social Policy Minor. Cross list with Sociology, Economics and Political Science. Freshman, Sophomore and Juniors only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 10:30AM - 11:45AM, T 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Deluca, Stefanie, Morgan, Barbara Anne, Schlozman, Daniel
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 8/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Sociology of Health and Illness
AS.230.341 (01)

This course introduces students to medical sociology, which is the application of the sociological perspective to health and health care. Major topics include stress, social epidemiology, and the social organization of health care.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Agree, Emily
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL, MSCH-HUM

Sociology of Health and Illness
AS.230.341 (04)

This course introduces students to medical sociology, which is the application of the sociological perspective to health and health care. Major topics include stress, social epidemiology, and the social organization of health care.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PM
  • Instructor: Agree, Emily
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL, MSCH-HUM

Schooling, Racial Inequality and Public Policy in America
AS.230.385 (01)

After examining alternative explanations for why individuals obtain different amounts and types of educational training, the course focuses on how an individual’s family background and race affect his or her trajectory through the educational system. The course covers the specific challenges that have confronted urban schooling in America since the 1960s, including the classic literature on the effects of school and community resources on student achievement as well as the development and later evaluation of school desegregation policies. The course also considers case studies of current policy debates in the US, such as housing segregation and school resegregation, voucher programs for school choice, and the motivation for and consequences of the establishment of state-mandated testing requirements. Throughout the course, emphasis is placed upon the alternative modes of inquiry and writing which opposing scholars, policymakers, and journalists use to address these contentious topics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Morgan, Stephen L
  • Room: Maryland 201
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, SPOL-UL

Politics and Society
AS.230.396 (01)

This seminar surveys key problems of political sociology including the rise of the modern state, the origins and nature of liberal democracy, sources of authority, the relationship between political and economic power, the nation-state and nationalism, states and war, ideology and political contention, collective identity, social movements, and social revolutions. Fulfills Comparative Politics for International Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Andreas, Joel
  • Room: Latrobe 120
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, INST-CP

Medical Humanitarianism
AS.230.335 (02)

Humanitarian organizations play life-preserving roles in global conflicts, and have front-row views of disasters ranging from the 2010 Haiti earthquake to the 2011 Fukushima tsunami in Japan. Yet even while they provide vital assistance to millions of people in crisis, such organizations are beset by important paradoxes that hinder their capacity to create sustainable interventions. They work to fill long-lasting needs, but are prone to moving quickly from one site to the next in search of the latest emergency. They strive to be apolitical, yet are invariably influenced by the geopolitical agendas of global powers. How do such contradictions arise, and what is their impact upon millions of aid recipients around the world? Drawing on case studies from South Sudan to Haiti, this course addresses these contradictions by exploring how and why medical aid organizations attempt, and sometimes fail, to reconcile short-term goals, such as immediate life-saving, with long-term missions, such as public health programs and conflict resolution initiatives.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Naveh Benjamin, Ilil
  • Room: Krieger 302
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, MSCH-HUM

Social Policy Seminar
AS.360.401 (01)

This course is designed for students who have completed either the Baltimore intensive semester of the Social Policy Minor. The students will make presentations and pursue joint projects based on what they have learned during the intensive semesters concerning key social policy issues.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Cherlin, Andrew J
  • Room: Mergenthaler 526
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Social Policy: Baltimore and Beyond
AS.360.247 (03)

This course will introduce students to basic concepts in economics, political science and sociology relevant to the study of social problems and the programs designed to remedy them. It will address the many inequalities in access to education and health care, unequal treatment in the criminal justice system, disparities in income and wealth, and differential access to political power. The focus will be on designing effective policies at the national and local level to address these pressing issues. This course is open to all students, but will be required for the new Social Policy Minor. The course is also recommended for students who are interested in law school, medical school, programs in public health, and graduate school in related social science fields. This course does not count as one of the required courses for the Economics major or minor, but it is required for the Social Policy Minor. Cross list with Sociology, Economics and Political Science. Freshman, Sophomore and Juniors only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 10:30AM - 11:45AM, T 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Deluca, Stefanie, Morgan, Barbara Anne, Schlozman, Daniel
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 15/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Sociology in Economic Life
AS.230.369 (01)

This course discusses how geopolitics, technology as well as social differentiation (such as race, class and gender) shape the structure of economic actions. Special attention will be paid to patterns of state-business relationship, labor processes, migrant economy, globalization and international division of labor.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Kuo, Huei-Ying
  • Room: Gilman 134
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, INST-PT

Space, Place, Poverty & Race: Sociological Perspectives on Neighborhoods & Public Housing
AS.230.313 (01)

Is a neighborhood just a grouping of individuals living in the same place, or do neighborhoods have collective meanings and impacts on children and families? We will capitalize on research methodologies used to define and describe neighborhoods and their effects on economic and educational outcomes. These include case studies, census data, surveys, quasi/experimental data. Focus is on how research measures neighborhood effects and incorporates community level processes into models of social causation (e.g., social capital/control, community efficacy, civic engagement). Also examined: patterns in residential mobility, segregation, and preferences within black and white populations; development of housing policy in the U.S.; programs to determine how neighborhoods affect issues of social importance. Statistics and public policy background is helpful but not required.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Deluca, Stefanie
  • Room: Gilman 55
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Police and Prisons
AS.362.115 (01)

This introductory course will examine policing and prisons in the United States and beyond, with a focus on racial inequality. It will consist of three parts. First, we will define key concepts in police and prison studies. Then, we will explore the contemporary state of prisons and policing in the United States and look at debates around the rise of “mass incarceration” and aggressive forms of policing in the final third of the 20th century. Third, we will explore policing and prison in other parts of the globe in the contemporary moment, highlighting similarities and differences from the U.S. case. What can studying the instruments of social control in other societies reveal about our own? Students will develop an understanding of major trends, keywords, and debates in the literature on policing and prisons, with particular reference to race and racism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Schrader, Stuart Laurence
  • Room: Latrobe 107
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-AP

Gender and International Development
AS.230.324 (01)

This course employs a comparative perspective to examine the gendered impact of international development experiences and policies. Students will discuss the historical evolution of how the concept of gender has been constructed, conceptualized, and integrated into international development theory and practice. The course will also examine how greater international development. In particular, we will examine structural theories of poverty reduction, individual theories of power and processes of stratification at the household and family level. Specific issue areas will include the globalization, class and work political participation and social movements. Cross-listed with International Studies (CP, IR). Fulfills Economics requirement for IS GSCD track students only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Agarwala, Rina
  • Room: Gilman 217
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR

Housing and Homelessness in the United States
AS.230.370 (01)

This course will examine the role of housing, or the absence thereof, in shaping quality of life. It will explore the consequences of the places in which we live and how we are housed. Consideration will be given to overcrowding, affordability, accessibility, and past and existing housing policies and their influence on society. Special attention will be given to the problem of homelessness.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Greif, Meredith
  • Room: Hodson 213
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, SPOL-UL

Introduction to Social Policy: Baltimore and Beyond
AS.360.247 (01)

This course will introduce students to basic concepts in economics, political science and sociology relevant to the study of social problems and the programs designed to remedy them. It will address the many inequalities in access to education and health care, unequal treatment in the criminal justice system, disparities in income and wealth, and differential access to political power. The focus will be on designing effective policies at the national and local level to address these pressing issues. This course is open to all students, but will be required for the new Social Policy Minor. The course is also recommended for students who are interested in law school, medical school, programs in public health, and graduate school in related social science fields. This course does not count as one of the required courses for the Economics major or minor, but it is required for the Social Policy Minor. Cross list with Sociology, Economics and Political Science. Freshman, Sophomore and Juniors only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 10:30AM - 11:45AM, T 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Deluca, Stefanie, Morgan, Barbara Anne, Schlozman, Daniel
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 10/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Social Statistics
AS.230.394 (01)

The application of statistical techniques commonly used in sociological analysis. Topics include measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability theory, confidence intervals, chi-square, anova, and regression analysis. Hands-on computer experience with statistical software and analysis of data from various fields of social research.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Reese, Michael Joseph, Jr.
  • Room: Bloomberg 176
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 1/2
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.190.437 (01)Race and Ethnic Politics in the United StatesTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMWeaver, VeslaMattin Center 162INST-AP
AS.230.150 (02)Issues in International DevelopmentTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMLevien, MichaelHodson 213GECS-SOCSCI, INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON, ENVS-MAJOR
AS.230.154 (01)Freshman Seminar: Gender, Health and AgingTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMAgree, EmilyGilman 277
AS.230.233 (01)Inequality and Social Change in Contemporary ChinaTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMLiang, GuoweiSmokler Center 301INST-CP
AS.230.265 (01)Research Tools for Global Sociology and DevelopmentStaff 
AS.230.244 (01)Race and Ethnicity in American SocietyTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMGreif, MeredithBloomberg 172INST-AP, SPOL-UL
AS.230.213 (01)Social TheoryMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMSchrader, Stuart LaurenceGilman 219INST-PT, GECS-SOCSCI
AS.230.175 (01)Chinese RevolutionsTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMKuo, Huei-YingGilman 134INST-NWHIST, INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.230.205 (01)Introduction to Social StatisticsMW 1:30PM - 2:45PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMReese, Michael Joseph, Jr.Bloomberg 176
AS.230.205 (02)Introduction to Social StatisticsMW 1:30PM - 2:45PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMReese, Michael Joseph, Jr.Bloomberg 176
AS.230.348 (01)Society in the AnthropoceneW 1:30PM - 4:00PMLevien, MichaelMattin Center 160ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.230.325 (01)Global Social Change and Development PracticumT 3:00PM - 5:30PMSilver, Beverly JudithHodson 311
AS.230.341 (03)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PMAgree, EmilyMergenthaler 111PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL, MSCH-HUM
AS.230.394 (02)Social StatisticsMW 1:30PM - 2:45PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMReese, Michael Joseph, Jr.Bloomberg 176
AS.230.318 (01)State and Society in Modern IndiaM 1:30PM - 4:00PMAgarwala, RinaHodson 316INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.230.378 (01)Refugees, Human Rights, and SovereigntyTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMNaveh Benjamin, IlilKrieger 300INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL
AS.230.341 (02)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PMAgree, EmilyMergenthaler 111PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL, MSCH-HUM
AS.230.304 (01)(Making Space For) Black ThoughtW 3:00PM - 5:30PMWhite, Alexandre Ilani ReinMaryland 104INST-PT
AS.230.335 (01)Medical HumanitarianismMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMNaveh Benjamin, IlilShriver Hall 104INST-IR, MSCH-HUM
AS.230.379 (01)Undergraduate Research SeminarAndreas, Joel 
AS.230.312 (01)Education & SocietyTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMBurdick-Will, JuliaGilman 75
AS.360.247 (02)Introduction to Social Policy: Baltimore and BeyondTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM, T 10:30AM - 11:45AMDeluca, Stefanie, Morgan, Barbara Anne, Schlozman, DanielMergenthaler 111
AS.230.341 (01)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PMAgree, EmilyMergenthaler 111PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL, MSCH-HUM
AS.230.341 (04)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PMAgree, EmilyMergenthaler 111PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL, MSCH-HUM
AS.230.385 (01)Schooling, Racial Inequality and Public Policy in AmericaMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMMorgan, Stephen LMaryland 201INST-AP, SPOL-UL
AS.230.396 (01)Politics and SocietyTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMAndreas, JoelLatrobe 120INST-PT, INST-CP
AS.230.335 (02)Medical HumanitarianismMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMNaveh Benjamin, IlilKrieger 302INST-IR, MSCH-HUM
AS.360.401 (01)Social Policy SeminarTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMCherlin, Andrew JMergenthaler 526
AS.360.247 (03)Introduction to Social Policy: Baltimore and BeyondTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM, T 10:30AM - 11:45AMDeluca, Stefanie, Morgan, Barbara Anne, Schlozman, DanielMergenthaler 111
AS.230.369 (01)Sociology in Economic LifeTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKuo, Huei-YingGilman 134INST-ECON, INST-PT
AS.230.313 (01)Space, Place, Poverty & Race: Sociological Perspectives on Neighborhoods & Public HousingT 3:00PM - 5:30PMDeluca, StefanieGilman 55
AS.362.115 (01)Introduction to Police and PrisonsMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMSchrader, Stuart LaurenceLatrobe 107INST-CP, INST-AP
AS.230.324 (01)Gender and International DevelopmentF 3:00PM - 5:30PMAgarwala, RinaGilman 217INST-CP, INST-IR
AS.230.370 (01)Housing and Homelessness in the United StatesTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMGreif, MeredithHodson 213INST-AP, SPOL-UL
AS.360.247 (01)Introduction to Social Policy: Baltimore and BeyondTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM, T 10:30AM - 11:45AMDeluca, Stefanie, Morgan, Barbara Anne, Schlozman, DanielMergenthaler 111
AS.230.394 (01)Social StatisticsMW 1:30PM - 2:45PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMReese, Michael Joseph, Jr.Bloomberg 176