Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

This is Not Propaganda
AS.196.364 (01)

We live in an era of disinformation’ mass persuasion and media manipulation run amok. More information was meant to improve democracy and undermine authoritarian regimes- instead the opposite seems to be happening. This course will take you from Russia to South Asia, Europe to the US, to analyze how our information environment has been transformed, why our old formulae for resisting manipulation are failing, and what needs to be done to create a model where deliberative democracy can flourish.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Pomeranzev, Peter
  • Room: Shaffer 303
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (01)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Cherlin, Andrew J
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (02)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Cherlin, Andrew J
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (03)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Cherlin, Andrew J
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (04)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Cherlin, Andrew J
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (05)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Cherlin, Andrew J
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (06)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Cherlin, Andrew J
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (07)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Cherlin, Andrew J
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (08)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Cherlin, Andrew J
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Research Methods for the Social Sciences
AS.230.202 (01)

The purpose of this course is to provide a sound introduction to the overall process of research and the specific research methods most frequently used by sociologists and other social scientists. Required for Sociology majors and IS GSCD track students.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Hao, Lingxin
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Research Methods for the Social Sciences
AS.230.202 (02)

The purpose of this course is to provide a sound introduction to the overall process of research and the specific research methods most frequently used by sociologists and other social scientists. Required for Sociology majors and IS GSCD track students.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Hao, Lingxin
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Research Methods for the Social Sciences
AS.230.202 (03)

The purpose of this course is to provide a sound introduction to the overall process of research and the specific research methods most frequently used by sociologists and other social scientists. Required for Sociology majors and IS GSCD track students.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Hao, Lingxin
  • Room: Mudd 26
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Social Theory
AS.230.213 (01)

This course will focus on three classical theorists whose ideas have greatly influenced the ways we study society: Karl Marx, Max Weber, and Emile Durkheim. The course is devoted to understanding how each theorist understood the origin, structure and historical dynamics of modern societies. In addition to comparing their theories, we will use them to analyze current social issues, including those involving social inequality, conflict, cohesion, and change.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Andreas, Joel
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

Disability and Society
AS.230.216 (01)

Objectives of this course are to achieve an understanding of the social context of disability from the population level to the individual disability experience. Topics will include social versus medical models of disability; the spectrum of ability; the history of disability; civil rights perspectives; life course and aging aspects of disability; and the role of the environment. Attention will be paid both to theoretical understandings of disability and the role of policies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Agree, Emily
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Global Social Change
AS.230.221 (01)

This course introduces students to issues of global social change, with a particular focus on the challenges of international development and the contemporary globalization process. Specific themes include world income inequality and global poverty, the rise of supranational organizations (e.g. WTO and EU) and their relations with sovereign states, anti-globalization activism, the rise of China and India in the global economy, and the origins as well as consequences of the current global economic crisis and global pandemics, among others. Lectures will be aided by documentary films and other multi-media materials. Special Note: Fulfills Economics requirement for IS GSCD track students only. Formerly offered as AS 230.353. Students who took AS.230.353 cannot take AS.230.221.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Hung, Ho-Fung
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-ECON, ENVS-MINOR

Freshman Seminar: Public Opinion and Democracy
AS.230.224 (01)

How does public opinion shape electoral behavior and the contours of democracy in the United States, and how have these relationships changed as techniques for measuring public opinion have evolved since the early twentieth century? To consider this question, the course introduces alternative perspectives on the features of a healthy democracy, including both historical perspectives and current arguments. Interweaved with this material, the course examines how public opinion is measured and interpreted by private pollsters, survey researchers, and data journalists. Emphasis is placed on the alternative claims that opposing analysts adopt, as well as how the technologies of data collection and analysis shape the permissibility of conclusions. Students will learn to interpret public opinion patterns, which requires a brief presentation of basic concepts from survey sampling, including what to make of the polling industry’s most boring concept: margin of error.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Morgan, Stephen L
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Inequality and Social Change in Contemporary China
AS.230.233 (01)

This course examines the trajectory of economic development in China since the beginning of market reforms in the late 1970s, with a special focus on social inequality and forms of resistance that have emerged in response to the expansion of the market economy. The first part of the course focuses on understanding the academic debates around China’s economic miracle and introduces students to theories about the relationship between market expansion and social resistance. The second part focuses on key thematic topics including the rural/urban divide, rural protest, urban inequality and labor unrest, gender and sexuality in social movements, environmental protests, and the politics of ethnic relations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Liang, Guowei
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-ECON

Coffee, Tea and Empires
AS.230.239 (01)

The course introduces the transformation of the coffee and tea industries in the long nineteenth century against the backdrop of European and Japanese colonial expansion. It surveys the social changes in the colonial world under the development of the cash crop economy. It also analyzes how the consumption of such caffeinated beverages became sources of heritage makings both in the metropoles and colonies and the latter's postcolonial reconstructions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Kuo, Huei-Ying
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-IR

Race and Ethnicity in American Society
AS.230.244 (01)

Race and ethnicity have played a prominent role in American society and continue to do so, as demonstrated by interracial and interethnic gaps in economic and educational achievement, residence, political power, family structure, crime, and health. Using a sociological framework, we will explore the historical significance of race and its development as a social construction, assess the causes and consequences of intergroup inequalities and explore potential solutions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Greif, Meredith
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 4/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

War and State: A Social Science Survey
AS.230.251 (01)

This course will introduce you to the cornerstone literature of contemporary social sciences on war and nation-state. Literature in this course comes from a variety of disciplines including sociology, political science, history and archaeology. We will start with basic definitions of key concepts of “war”, “state” and “state formation”. Then we will read different theories of how evolutions in war and military gave rise to modern states as we see today. After that we will survey a stream of historical cases of war and state formation across Europe, Asia and Africa in different historical periods. Finally, we will contemplate what influences war and military continue to exert in contemporary societies and states, and the challenges that lie ahead.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Fang, Zhicao
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Advanced Topics in International Development
AS.230.315 (01)

This class offers an advanced engagement of various topics in international development. The course begins with an historical examination of the actors and global events, as well as the intellectual debates, that birthed the field of international development as a discrete area of study and practice. We will then analyze the evolving theories that dominated the first five decades of the international development effort. The final part of the course will examine more recent perspectives that have attempted to fill the intellectual void left by the demise of the traditional development paradigm. Here we will cover topics that span the global North and South, including issues of race/caste/ethnicity, migration, gender, and right-wing nationalism. Some prior knowledge of international development is recommended

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Agarwala, Rina
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 3/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-CP, INST-ECON

Qualitative Research Practicum
AS.230.323 (01)

This course provides "hands on" research experience applying sociological research tools and a sociological perspective to problems of substance. Qualitative observational and/or interviewing methods will be emphasized. Students will design and carry out a research project and write a research report. This course fulfills the "research practicum" requirement for the Sociology major.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Amen Strayhorn, Kali-ahset
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): CSC-CE

Gender and International Development
AS.230.324 (01)

This course employs a comparative perspective to examine the gendered impact of international development experiences and policies. Students will discuss the historical evolution of how the concept of gender has been constructed, conceptualized, and integrated into international development theory and practice. The course will also examine how greater international development. In particular, we will examine structural theories of poverty reduction, individual theories of power and processes of stratification at the household and family level. Specific issue areas will include the globalization, class and work political participation and social movements. Cross-listed with International Studies (CP, IR). Fulfills Economics requirement for IS GSCD track students only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Agarwala, Rina
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR

Medical Humanitarianism
AS.230.335 (01)

Humanitarian organizations play life-preserving roles in global conflicts, and have front-row views of disasters ranging from the 2010 Haiti earthquake to the 2011 Fukushima tsunami in Japan. Yet even while they provide vital assistance to millions of people in crisis, such organizations are beset by important paradoxes that hinder their capacity to create sustainable interventions. They work to fill long-lasting needs, but are prone to moving quickly from one site to the next in search of the latest emergency. They strive to be apolitical, yet are invariably influenced by the geopolitical agendas of global powers. How do such contradictions arise, and what is their impact upon millions of aid recipients around the world? Drawing on case studies from South Sudan to Haiti, this course addresses these contradictions by exploring how and why medical aid organizations attempt, and sometimes fail, to reconcile short-term goals, such as immediate life-saving, with long-term missions, such as public health programs and conflict resolution initiatives.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Naveh Benjamin, Ilil
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, MSCH-HUM

Medical Humanitarianism
AS.230.335 (02)

Humanitarian organizations play life-preserving roles in global conflicts, and have front-row views of disasters ranging from the 2010 Haiti earthquake to the 2011 Fukushima tsunami in Japan. Yet even while they provide vital assistance to millions of people in crisis, such organizations are beset by important paradoxes that hinder their capacity to create sustainable interventions. They work to fill long-lasting needs, but are prone to moving quickly from one site to the next in search of the latest emergency. They strive to be apolitical, yet are invariably influenced by the geopolitical agendas of global powers. How do such contradictions arise, and what is their impact upon millions of aid recipients around the world? Drawing on case studies from South Sudan to Haiti, this course addresses these contradictions by exploring how and why medical aid organizations attempt, and sometimes fail, to reconcile short-term goals, such as immediate life-saving, with long-term missions, such as public health programs and conflict resolution initiatives.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Naveh Benjamin, Ilil
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, MSCH-HUM

Sociology of Health and Illness
AS.230.341 (01)

This course introduces students to core concepts that define the sociological approach to health, illness and health care. Topics include: health disparities, social context of health and illness, and the Sociology of Medicine.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Agree, Emily
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL

Sociology of Health and Illness
AS.230.341 (02)

This course introduces students to core concepts that define the sociological approach to health, illness and health care. Topics include: health disparities, social context of health and illness, and the Sociology of Medicine.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Agree, Emily
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL

Sociology of Health and Illness
AS.230.341 (03)

This course introduces students to core concepts that define the sociological approach to health, illness and health care. Topics include: health disparities, social context of health and illness, and the Sociology of Medicine.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PM
  • Instructor: Agree, Emily
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL

Sociology of Health and Illness
AS.230.341 (04)

This course introduces students to core concepts that define the sociological approach to health, illness and health care. Topics include: health disparities, social context of health and illness, and the Sociology of Medicine.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PM
  • Instructor: Agree, Emily
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL

Chinese Diaspora: Networks and Identity
AS.230.352 (01)

This course combines lecture and class discussion. It examines the history and historiography of Chinese overseas migration. Major issues include overseas Chinese as “merchants without empire,” Chinese exclusion acts in the age of mass migration, the “Chinese question” in postcolonial Southeast Asia, as well as the making and unmaking of Chinese identity in the current wave of globalization.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Kuo, Huei-Ying
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP

Baltimore and Beyond
AS.230.357 (01)

This course uses the city of Baltimore as a lens through which to explore issues of urban inequality. We will focus on Baltimore's history of racial segregation and concentrated poverty, and its effect on the social and economic well-being of the city and its residents, with attention to education, employment, health and crime. Students will learn how to employ Census data, GIS approaches, and sociological research to inform questions about population change, inequality and the distribution of resources across the city and metropolitan region. Students will also work on one or more policy relevant studies based in Baltimore, including: a project on abandoned and vacant housing, a desegregation intervention, and a longitudinal study of inner city youth. Finally, students will become familiar with Baltimore City's programs and policy approaches to addressing the city's most pressing problems, and will design innovative and effective and innovative solutions as part of their course assignments. Enrollment restricted to Social Policy minors only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Deluca, Stefanie
  • Room: Shaffer 2
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): SPOL-UL

Housing and Homelessness in the United States
AS.230.370 (01)

This course will examine the role of housing, or the absence thereof, in shaping quality of life. It will explore the consequences of the places in which we live and how we are housed. Consideration will be given to overcrowding, affordability, accessibility, and past and existing housing policies and their influence on society. Special attention will be given to the problem of homelessness.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Greif, Meredith
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, SPOL-UL

Refugees, Human Rights, and Sovereignty
AS.230.378 (01)

What is a refugee? Since World War II, states that have pledged to offer protection to refugees have frequently been drawn instead to the dictates of nationalism and communitarianism, which prioritize concern for their own citizens, rather than to the needs of forced migrants. As a result, even those migrants that have been formally recognized as refugees according to the 1951 UN Refugee Convention have not been assured of protection, and other migrants have been even less assured. In this course, we will locate the reasons for this reality in the legal, political, and historical underpinnings of political asylum. What is the difference between an asylum seeker and a refugee? How has the refugee category been redefined and contested by international bodies since 1951? How are the ambiguities of real-life violence and persecution simplified in asylum adjudication interviews that require clear, factual narratives? What kinds of protections are offered to asylum seekers, whether by UN bodies, NGOs, or host governments, and how have such protections varied geographically and historically? Finally, what protections, if any, are afforded to those migrants who are fleeing not persecution but rather “merely” endemic poverty or climate-induced displacement? The course draws on literature from sociology, history, anthropology, and international refugee law in order to understand the capacity (or lack thereof) of human rights discourses and declarations to contravene state sovereignty in the name of protecting the rightless.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Naveh Benjamin, Ilil
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Undergraduate Research Seminar
AS.230.379 (01)

Seminar for Sociology students writing senior honor theses and conducting pre-approved independent research projects. Juniors and Seniors Sociology majors only. Permission of instructor.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Andreas, Joel
  • Room:  
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Contemporary Social Theory
AS.230.395 (01)

What is the structure of society, how does it change, and how is it reproduced? What is the relation between social structures and our ideas about them? What are the conditions of possibility for human freedom? This course will examine how major social theorists of the 20th century advanced novel answers to these questions as they grappled with the historical events and social concerns of the 20thcentury—the Russian revolution and its degeneration into Stalinism, the failure of communist movements in the West, the rise and fall of fascism and Nazism, the consolidation of capitalist democracies and welfare states, the emergence of anti-colonial movements in the “Third World,” and the persistence of race, gender and sexuality as forms of domination. In addition to understanding and comparing theories, we will assess their usefulness for understanding the present. This is a reading and writing-intensive seminar.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Levien, Michael
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-PT

The Political Economy of Drugs and Drug Wars
AS.230.397 (01)

In the United States, we spend more than $100 billion annually on illegal drugs—and the government spends more than $50 billion a year to combat their sale and use. These statistics raise important and complicated social questions. This course will examine the production, sale, use, and control of illegal drugs from a historical and sociological perspective. We will have three objectives: to understand the social construction of drug use and illegality in the United States and other rich countries; to uncover the political and economic consequences of drug trafficking in those countries that produce drugs, particularly in Latin America; and to examine the political economy of drug control through the so-called War on Drugs, both domestically and internationally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Thornton, Christy
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/9
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Development and Social Change in Rural China
AS.310.340 (01)

This course will survey the major issues of development and social change in rural China since 1950s. These issues will be addressed in chronological order. They include land ownership and land grabbing, organization of rural economic, political, and social life, rural elections and village governance, development strategies, urban-rural relationship in resource allocation, rural modernization strategies in regard to irrigation, clean drinking water, electricity supply, hard paved road, education and rural medical service, women’s rights and family life, rural consumption, and etc. This course will prepare students, both empirically and analytically, to understand what happened in rural China from 1949 to the present, and how we can engage in policy and theoretical discussions based on what we learn.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: He, Gaochao
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP

Policy and Practice in Human Services
AS.360.308 (01)

This course will focus on the policies that frame human service programs and the methods that are used to deliver them. Students will be given the opportunity to review the challenges of implementing programs and reforms in government and to consider the impact human services have on the population served.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Tierney, Molly
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Methods for Policy Research
AS.360.331 (01)

This course will introduce students to quantitative methods for studying social policy problems. Topics to be covered include descriptive statistics and sampling, correlation and causation, simple and multiple regression, experimental methods, and an introduction to cost-benefit analysis. The emphasis will be on the selection, interpretation and practical application of these methodologies in specific policy settings, rather than with formal proofs. Skills will be reinforced by hands-on exercises using statistical software. Over the course of the semester, students will critically analyze policy reports and empirical research in a range of policy areas and learn how to present this research to a non-specialist audience. Finally, we will discuss the pros and cons of quantitative vs. qualitative methodologies. The course will conclude with group presentations that draw on all these skills. Enrollment restricted to Social Policy minors only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Morgan, Barbara Anne
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Public Policy Writing Workshop
AS.360.366 (01)

This workshop is designed to hone the analytical and communications skills necessary for effective formulation and advocacy of public policy. Topics include how to develop op-ed pieces and other forms of advocacy journalism, memoranda, position papers, and grant proposals. The workshop puts special stress on how to make a clear and persuasive exposition of complex or counter-intuitive policy arguments in the market place of ideas, including the challenges of writing for popular journals and communicating to specific audiences both in and out of government. Students receive intensive individual instruction, including close editing of their work and advice on how to publish or promote it in the public sphere. Enrollment restricted to Social Policy minors only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 11:30AM - 2:00PM
  • Instructor: Houppert, Karen
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Cutting Through the Gaze: An Introduction to Social Justice Cinema
AS.362.118 (01)

This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of community-engaged documentary filmmaking with a focus on both theory and practice. It will examine documentary filmmaking as an educational tool for raising social- and racial- justice issues from an African diasporic and global perspective. The course is taught by award-winning professional documentary filmmakers. Students will produce their own 3-5 minute film or audio podcast. Students will select their documentary film topic, conduct their own research, and move from pre-production into production. No prior experience in filmmaking is required for this course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Nuriddin, Najma Reshmaan
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Hot Topics in Education
AS.365.102 (01)

This course examines current school reform initiatives and the controversies surrounding them through a sociological lens.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Burdick-Will, Julia
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.196.364 (01)This is Not PropagandaMW 1:30PM - 2:20PMPomeranzev, PeterShaffer 303INST-CP, INST-IR
AS.230.101 (01)Introduction to SociologyF 10:00AM - 10:50AMCherlin, Andrew J 
AS.230.101 (02)Introduction to SociologyF 10:00AM - 10:50AMCherlin, Andrew J 
AS.230.101 (03)Introduction to SociologyF 12:00PM - 12:50PMCherlin, Andrew J 
AS.230.101 (04)Introduction to SociologyF 11:00AM - 11:50AMCherlin, Andrew J 
AS.230.101 (05)Introduction to SociologyF 11:00AM - 11:50AMCherlin, Andrew J 
AS.230.101 (06)Introduction to SociologyF 11:00AM - 11:50AMCherlin, Andrew J 
AS.230.101 (07)Introduction to SociologyF 10:00AM - 10:50AMCherlin, Andrew J 
AS.230.101 (08)Introduction to SociologyF 11:00AM - 11:50AMCherlin, Andrew J 
AS.230.202 (01)Research Methods for the Social SciencesF 10:00AM - 10:50AMHao, Lingxin 
AS.230.202 (02)Research Methods for the Social SciencesF 10:00AM - 10:50AMHao, Lingxin 
AS.230.202 (03)Research Methods for the Social SciencesF 10:00AM - 10:50AMHao, LingxinMudd 26
AS.230.213 (01)Social TheoryTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMAndreas, Joel INST-PT
AS.230.216 (01)Disability and SocietyW 3:00PM - 5:30PMAgree, Emily 
AS.230.221 (01)Global Social ChangeMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMHung, Ho-Fung INST-IR, INST-ECON, ENVS-MINOR
AS.230.224 (01)Freshman Seminar: Public Opinion and DemocracyMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMMorgan, Stephen L INST-AP
AS.230.233 (01)Inequality and Social Change in Contemporary ChinaTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMLiang, Guowei INST-CP, INST-ECON
AS.230.239 (01)Coffee, Tea and EmpiresTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMKuo, Huei-Ying INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-IR
AS.230.244 (01)Race and Ethnicity in American SocietyTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMGreif, Meredith INST-AP
AS.230.251 (01)War and State: A Social Science SurveyTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMFang, Zhicao INST-IR, INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.230.315 (01)Advanced Topics in International DevelopmentF 3:00PM - 5:30PMAgarwala, Rina INST-IR, INST-CP, INST-ECON
AS.230.323 (01)Qualitative Research PracticumTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMAmen Strayhorn, Kali-ahset CSC-CE
AS.230.324 (01)Gender and International DevelopmentT 3:00PM - 5:30PMAgarwala, Rina INST-CP, INST-IR
AS.230.335 (01)Medical HumanitarianismMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMNaveh Benjamin, Ilil INST-IR, MSCH-HUM
AS.230.335 (02)Medical HumanitarianismMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMNaveh Benjamin, Ilil INST-IR, MSCH-HUM
AS.230.341 (01)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PMAgree, Emily PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL
AS.230.341 (02)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PMAgree, Emily PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL
AS.230.341 (03)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PMAgree, Emily PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL
AS.230.341 (04)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PMAgree, Emily PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL
AS.230.352 (01)Chinese Diaspora: Networks and IdentityTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKuo, Huei-Ying INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP
AS.230.357 (01)Baltimore and BeyondT 4:00PM - 6:30PMDeluca, StefanieShaffer 2SPOL-UL
AS.230.370 (01)Housing and Homelessness in the United StatesTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMGreif, Meredith INST-AP, SPOL-UL
AS.230.378 (01)Refugees, Human Rights, and SovereigntyTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMNaveh Benjamin, Ilil INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.230.379 (01)Undergraduate Research SeminarM 1:30PM - 4:00PMAndreas, Joel 
AS.230.395 (01)Contemporary Social TheoryT 1:30PM - 4:00PMLevien, Michael INST-CP, INST-PT
AS.230.397 (01)The Political Economy of Drugs and Drug WarsTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMThornton, Christy INST-ECON, INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.310.340 (01)Development and Social Change in Rural ChinaW 1:30PM - 4:00PMHe, Gaochao INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP
AS.360.308 (01)Policy and Practice in Human ServicesM 4:00PM - 6:30PMTierney, Molly 
AS.360.331 (01)Methods for Policy ResearchTh 4:00PM - 6:30PMMorgan, Barbara Anne 
AS.360.366 (01)Public Policy Writing WorkshopM 11:30AM - 2:00PMHouppert, Karen 
AS.362.118 (01)Cutting Through the Gaze: An Introduction to Social Justice CinemaTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMNuriddin, Najma Reshmaan 
AS.365.102 (01)Hot Topics in EducationTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMBurdick-Will, Julia