Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Racial Inequality, Policy and Politics in the US
AS.190.300 (01)

While policies were passed to ensure equal opportunity for racially subjugated Americans, the United States witnessed increasing stratification of wealth and income and deepening concentration of poverty, stagnation in closing racial gaps, and new forms of inequality posed by the striking upsurge in contact with the criminal justice system at the bottom of the skills ladder and concentration of wealth at the top. At the same time, the welfare state came under attack and faced challenges posed by an aging population, women entering the labor force, deindustrialization, and international pressures of globalization. Social spending withered in some areas while spending on citizens was increasingly likely to happen through tax expenditures and private means. This course investigates the politics around these developments and competing perspectives in debates over redistributive policies in the United States and their impact on inequality, particularly race and gender inequality. We will examine the contours of inequality and explanations for why it has expanded over the past several decades. We explore why the US is exceptional in both the level of inequality it tolerates and the generosity and types of remedies to alleviate poverty in comparison to its European counterparts and debate the role of race, unions, electoral politics and institutions. We investigate several specific cases of persistent racial inequality – concentrated poverty, segregation, and incarceration. We investigate both how policies have reinforced racial and gender divisions from a top-down perspective as well as examining under what conditions the disadvantaged contest inequality, exploring how political struggle shapes policy from the bottom-up. The last part of the course examines the consequences of inequality and social policy for representation and citizenship and how economic inequality affects political representation and responsiveness of elites to masses.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Weaver, Vesla
  • Room: Hodson 216  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/30
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Freshman Seminar: Gender, Health and Aging
AS.230.154 (01)

In this course students will develop an understanding of the ways in which gender structures health and well being through adulthood and later life. The experience of sexual minorities and the ntersection of gender with class and ethnicity will also be discussed. Students will be expected to participate actively and lead discussions on specific topics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Agree, Emily
  • Room: Bloomberg 178  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Social Statistics
AS.230.205 (01)

This course will introduce students to the application of statistical techniques commonly used in sociological analysis. Topics include measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability theory, confidence intervals, chi-square, anova, and regression analysis. Hands-on computer experience with statistical software and analysis of data from various fields of social research. Special Note: Required for IS GSCD track students.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Reese, Michael Joseph, Jr.
  • Room: Hodson 316 Gilman 377
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Social Statistics
AS.230.205 (02)

This course will introduce students to the application of statistical techniques commonly used in sociological analysis. Topics include measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability theory, confidence intervals, chi-square, anova, and regression analysis. Hands-on computer experience with statistical software and analysis of data from various fields of social research. Special Note: Required for IS GSCD track students.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Reese, Michael Joseph, Jr.
  • Room: Hodson 316 Gilman 377
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Social Theory
AS.230.213 (01)

This course will focus on four classical social theorists whose ideas have greatly influenced how we study and understand society: Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim, Max Weber and W.E.B. DuBois. Students will gain an in-depth understanding of how each theorist answered three major questions: 1) what is the origin, structure and historical dynamic of modern society?; 2) how do we gain an accurate knowledge of society?; 3) what are the conditions of possibility for freedom in modern society? In comparing, applying and critiquing their respective theories, students will advance their own theory of society.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Levien, Michael
  • Room: Hodson 211  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/30
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, GECS-SOCSCI

Colonialism in Asia and Its Contested Legacies
AS.230.228 (01)

This course surveys the impacts of colonialism in East and Southeast Asia. Special attention will be paid to the social and economic development in British Singapore and Hong Kong as well as Japanese Korea and Taiwan. Topics include free-trade imperialism, colonial modernity, anticolonial movements, pan-Asianism, and post-war U.S. hegemony.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Kuo, Huei-Ying
  • Room: Gilman 413  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Inequality and Social Change in Contemporary China
AS.230.233 (01)

This course examines the trajectory of economic development in China since the beginning of market reforms in the late 1970s, with a special focus on social inequality and forms of resistance that have emerged in response to the expansion of the market economy. The first part of the course focuses on understanding the academic debates around China’s economic miracle and introduces students to theories about the relationship between market expansion and social resistance. The second part focuses on key thematic topics including the rural/urban divide, rural protest, urban inequality and labor unrest, gender and sexuality in social movements, environmental protests, and the politics of ethnic relations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Liang, Guowei
  • Room: Hodson 305  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

War and State: A Social Science Survey
AS.230.251 (01)

This course will introduce you to the cornerstone literature of contemporary social sciences on war and nation-state. Literature in this course comes from a variety of disciplines including sociology, political science, history and archaeology. We will start with basic definitions of key concepts of “war”, “state” and “state formation”. Then we will read different theories of how evolutions in war and military gave rise to modern states as we see today. After that we will survey a stream of historical cases of war and state formation across Europe, Asia and Africa in different historical periods. Finally, we will contemplate what influences war and military continue to exert in contemporary societies and states, and the challenges that lie ahead.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Fang, Zhicao
  • Room: Latrobe 107  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Plagues, Power, and Social Control
AS.230.306 (01)

While developments in biomedicine and health care have led to the eradication, cure and management of many human health problems, disease, illness and health have also been the focus for aggressive social controls and population management. The technologies and practices of disease control and health management have been foundational to some of the most aggressive structures of oppression in recent history such as the Jewish Ghetto, the Concentration Camp, the South African Township and techniques of segregation. This course seeks to explore how epidemics and disease control are linked to larger questions of power, state craft and international dynamics. This course asks how have outbreaks of infectious disease shaped social and political action? How do societies respond to outbreaks and why? What do epidemic moments tell us about global structures of power and the dynamics of control? Drawing on historical cases including plague during the European Renaissance and before, the HIV/AIDS Pandemic and the West African Ebola Outbreak of 2013-2016, this course will introduce students to the history and practices of disease control as well as important theoretical perspectives by which to understand the sociological and historical effects of disease and the responses to them. Students will engage sociological concepts such as biopolitics, social construction of disease and illness and biosecurity and produce a final research paper examining the outcomes and responses to an epidemic event to show mastery of the topics covered in the course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: White, Alexandre Ilani Rein
  • Room: Bloomberg 168  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM

Sociology of the Military-Industrial Complex
AS.230.326 (01)

Students will critically examine the U.S. military-industrial complex-and the social relations that constitute it-in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries by drawing on works from sociology, history, political science, geography, and economics. Over the course of the semester, we will interrogate how (and by whom) war is made. In 2020, over a third of the record-breaking U.S. Department of Defense budget was earmarked for the procurement of weapons and supplies from for-profit armaments firms. Billions more flow to private companies that provide services-from security and combat to cleaning and food preparation-to the military. Over 2 million people are directly employed by the U.S. military, and countless more by its myriad private contractors. This sprawling network of private corporations, armed services, political actors, and workers constitute the military-industrial complex. By examining this network of actors that “make war,” students will explore the social, political, and economic dimensions of U.S. militarism and their changes over time.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Payne, Corey Robert
  • Room: Bloomberg 278  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-CP

Medical Humanitarianism
AS.230.335 (01)

Humanitarian organizations play life-preserving roles in global conflicts, and have front-row views of disasters ranging from the 2010 Haiti earthquake to the 2011 Fukushima tsunami in Japan. Yet even while they provide vital assistance to millions of people in crisis, such organizations are beset by important paradoxes that hinder their capacity to create sustainable interventions. They work to fill long-lasting needs, but are prone to moving quickly from one site to the next in search of the latest emergency. They strive to be apolitical, yet are invariably influenced by the geopolitical agendas of global powers. How do such contradictions arise, and what is their impact upon millions of aid recipients around the world? Drawing on case studies from South Sudan to Haiti, this course addresses these contradictions by exploring how and why medical aid organizations attempt, and sometimes fail, to reconcile short-term goals, such as immediate life-saving, with long-term missions, such as public health programs and conflict resolution initiatives.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Naveh Benjamin, Ilil
  • Room: Krieger 300  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, MSCH-HUM

Resistance, Rebellion, and Revolution in Latin America
AS.230.342 (01)

This course will examine the dynamics of transformative social change in Latin America and the Caribbean through analyses of resistance, rebellion, and revolution. Because revolutionary change is at once the most transformative and the most rare, this course will cover the exemplary cases of the Haitian, Mexican, and Cuban revolutions, but then also ask how theorists have understood the dynamics of both open rebellion and of everyday resistance in societies deeply structured by racial, gender, and class power, situated within an unequal world system. Attending to both local and global dynamics, this course will ask how Latin American dynamics have both conformed to and challenged universalist theories of social change.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Thornton, Christy
  • Room: Bloomberg 176  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Climate Change and Society
AS.230.348 (01)

This course will focus on the social dimensions of climate change. Drawing on global and multi-disciplinary scholarship, we will address such issues as: the history of fossil capitalism; the relationship between social inequality and “vulnerability” to climate change (including heat waves, drought, rising seas, and extreme weather); climate migration and the political economy of “adaptation”; the merits of various mitigation strategies, including the Green New Deal, conservation offsets, and geo-engineering; the roots of climate denialism; and climate justice movements. Students will write a final research paper on a sociological aspect of climate change.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Levien, Michael
  • Room: Ames 218  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP, MSCH-HUM

Sociology in Economic Life
AS.230.369 (01)

This course discusses how geopolitics, technology as well as social differentiation (such as race, class and gender) shape the structure of economic actions. Special attention will be paid to patterns of state-business relationship, labor processes, migrant economy, globalization and international division of labor.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Kuo, Huei-Ying
  • Room: Gilman 413  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, INST-PT

Housing and Homelessness in the United States
AS.230.370 (01)

This course will examine the role of housing, or the absence thereof, in shaping quality of life. It will explore the consequences of the places in which we live and how we are housed. Consideration will be given to overcrowding, affordability, accessibility, and past and existing housing policies and their influence on society. Special attention will be given to the problem of homelessness.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Greif, Meredith
  • Room: Krieger 308  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, SPOL-UL

Schooling, Racial Inequality and Public Policy in America
AS.230.385 (01)

After examining alternative explanations for why individuals obtain different amounts and types of educational training, the course focuses on how an individual’s family background and race affect his or her trajectory through the educational system. The course covers the specific challenges that have confronted urban schooling in America since the 1960s, including the classic literature on the effects of school and community resources on student achievement as well as the development and later evaluation of school desegregation policies. The course also considers case studies of current policy debates in the US, such as housing segregation and school resegregation, voucher programs for school choice, and the motivation for and consequences of the establishment of state-mandated testing requirements. Throughout the course, emphasis is placed upon the alternative modes of inquiry and writing which opposing scholars, policymakers, and journalists use to address these contentious topics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Morgan, Stephen L
  • Room: Ames 234  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, SPOL-UL

The Political Economy of Drugs and Drug Wars
AS.230.397 (01)

In the United States, we spend more than $100 billion annually on illegal drugs—and the government spends more than $50 billion a year to combat their sale and use. These statistics raise important and complicated social questions. This course will examine the production, sale, use, and control of illegal drugs from a historical and sociological perspective. We will have three objectives: to understand the social construction of drug use and illegality in the United States and other rich countries; to uncover the political and economic consequences of drug trafficking in those countries that produce drugs, particularly in Latin America; and to examine the political economy of drug control through the so-called War on Drugs, both domestically and internationally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Thornton, Christy
  • Room: Krieger Laverty  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM

Neoliberalism
AS.230.405 (01)

Neoliberalism, a political project that seeks to subject all aspects of social life to free market force, has ascended to orthodoxy in developed and developing countries alike over the last four decades. This course is a reading seminar focused on some of the key classic and cutting-edge original texts that critically examine and debate the origins, socio-political impacts, and crisis of the neoliberal project. It will cover such topics as the genealogy of the neoliberal idea, neoliberal state, informalization of works, neoliberal cities, rise of the one percent, and global governance. Class will be a mix of lecture and seminar-style discussions. Requirements include reading memo, class presentation, and a term paper.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Hung, Ho-Fung
  • Room: Mergenthaler 526  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/10
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, INST-ECON

Documentary Photography in a Changing China
AS.310.210 (01)

This course aims to inspire students to explore the impacts, meanings, and explanations of social transformation in contemporary China, via the lens of documentary photography. The photographic images of selective topics will include the products of photojournalism and documentary photography, and several documentary films, by both Chinese and non-Chinese photographers. While one picture is worth thousand words, one picture may also provoke countless interpretations. Students are strongly encouraged to read broadly about different aspects of social transformations in contemporary China, and to select and curate their own subjects of photo images. The spirit of comparative study of documentary photography of China and other parts of world will be strongly encouraged. Active class participation is imperative. A small exhibition on the campus will be organized by the Spring semester. The course is designed for upper division undergraduates. Cross-listed with Sociology and International Studies (CP).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: He, Gaochao
  • Room: Hodson 313  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Sociology of Health and Illness
AS.230.341 (02)

This course introduces students to medical sociology, which is the application of the sociological perspective to health and health care. Major topics include stress, social epidemiology, and the social organization of health care.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Agree, Emily
  • Room: Virtual Online Maryland 104
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL, MSCH-HUM

Sociology of Policing and Resistance in Race-Class Subjugated Communities
AS.230.430 (01)

Policing has become a primary way that many Americans see and experience government, particularly those from race-class subjugated communities, and has been a site of resistance and freedom struggles since the first Reconstruction. In this undergraduate seminar, we will survey key debates around policing and social movements, with a particular focus on research that takes institutional development, history, and racial orders seriously. A core preoccupation of this course will be to understand the ways in which policing “makes race” and how debates about crime, surveillance, and safety were often debates about black inclusion and equality. We will explore changes in the racial logics of policing over time, debates over how policing helped construct the racial order, and the consequences of several shifts in policing for communities. From broken windows policing in New York to the emergence of the new vagrancy-style banishment laws in urban Seattle to the men who live under constant surveillance in Philadelphia and to the large share of blacks in Ferguson with outstanding warrants for ‘failure to appear”, these policies and policing regimes have helped remake the government in the eyes of the urban poor. How does exposure to criminal justice interventions shape political learning, racial lifeworlds, and community social capital? The course will include a range of methods (ethnography, historical analysis, quantitative and qualitative).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Weaver, Vesla
  • Room: Shaffer 2  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Sociology of Health and Illness
AS.230.341 (03)

This course introduces students to medical sociology, which is the application of the sociological perspective to health and health care. Major topics include stress, social epidemiology, and the social organization of health care.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PM
  • Instructor: Agree, Emily
  • Room: Virtual Online Gilman 219
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL, MSCH-HUM

The Politics of Mental Health
AS.230.358 (01)

This course examines how the psy disciplines – psychology, psychiatry, psychotherapy and related fields – create knowledge about the mind, and how these fields have in turn shaped political and social life since early 20th century. We will explore how the psy disciplines have proven useful to projects of state building by reconstructing the human mind as a calculable, quantifiable entity, one that can be measured and governed across diverse educational, military, and healthcare settings. We will then ask how psychiatric categories such as bipolar disorder and PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder) were created, and consider their impact on both the legal/medical management of illness and on lay and expert notions of sanity and normality. Finally, we will examine the rising influence of humanitarian mental health interventions, and immerse ourselves in the debates they have engendered concerning the use of psychotherapy to alleviate suffering in war and disaster zones.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Naveh Benjamin, Ilil
  • Room: Krieger 300  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Introduction to Social Policy and Inequality: Baltimore and Beyond
AS.360.247 (01)

This course will introduce students to basic concepts in economics, political science and sociology relevant to the study of social problems and the programs designed to remedy them. It will address the many inequalities in access to education and health care, unequal treatment in the criminal justice system, disparities in income and wealth, and differential access to political power. The focus will be on designing effective policies at the national and local level to address these pressing issues. This course is open to all students, but will be required for the new Social Policy Minor. The course is also recommended for students who are interested in law school, medical school, programs in public health, and graduate school in related social science fields. This course does not count as one of the required courses for the Economics major or minor, but it is required for the Social Policy Minor. Cross list with Sociology, Economics and Political Science. Freshman, Sophomore and Juniors only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 10:30AM - 11:45AM, T 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Burdick-Will, Julia, Lieberman, Robert C, Morgan, Barbara Anne
  • Room: Virtual Online Latrobe 107
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 1/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Undergraduate Research Seminar
AS.230.379 (01)

The Sociology Undergraduate Research Seminar is a workshop for Sociology majors writing senior honor theses or conducting pre-approved independent research projects. It is open to juniors or seniors, with permission of the instructor.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Andreas, Joel
  • Room: Smokler Center 214  
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 4/6
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Issues in International Development
AS.230.150 (01)

Why do billions of people continue to live in poverty? What obstacles stand in the way of secure and dignified lives for all? Who is most likely to bring about change, what strategies should they follow, and what kinds of institutions should they put in place? This course will introduce the main theoretical perspectives, debates, and themes in the field of international development since the mid-20th century. It has three sections. The first section focuses on debates over the optimal conditions and strategies for generating economic growth and on the relationship between growth, human welfare, and inequality. The second section presents critical assessments of development interventions from various perspectives. The third section considers the role of social movements in shaping development and social change in the 21st century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Agarwala, Rina
  • Room: Bloomberg 176  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/25
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI, INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON, ENVS-MAJOR

Sociology of Health and Illness
AS.230.341 (05)

This course introduces students to medical sociology, which is the application of the sociological perspective to health and health care. Major topics include stress, social epidemiology, and the social organization of health care.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PM
  • Instructor: Agree, Emily
  • Room: Virtual Online Croft Hall G02
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL, MSCH-HUM

Sociology of Health and Illness
AS.230.341 (01)

This course introduces students to medical sociology, which is the application of the sociological perspective to health and health care. Major topics include stress, social epidemiology, and the social organization of health care.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Agree, Emily
  • Room: Virtual Online Gilman 219
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL, MSCH-HUM

Sociology of Health and Illness
AS.230.341 (04)

This course introduces students to medical sociology, which is the application of the sociological perspective to health and health care. Major topics include stress, social epidemiology, and the social organization of health care.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PM
  • Instructor: Agree, Emily
  • Room: Virtual Online Maryland 104
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL, MSCH-HUM

Social Policy Seminar
AS.360.401 (01)

This course is designed for students who have completed either the Baltimore intensive semester of the Social Policy Minor. The students will make presentations and pursue joint projects based on what they have learned during the intensive semesters concerning key social policy issues.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Greif, Meredith
  • Room: Shaffer 2  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Social Policy and Inequality: Baltimore and Beyond
AS.360.247 (02)

This course will introduce students to basic concepts in economics, political science and sociology relevant to the study of social problems and the programs designed to remedy them. It will address the many inequalities in access to education and health care, unequal treatment in the criminal justice system, disparities in income and wealth, and differential access to political power. The focus will be on designing effective policies at the national and local level to address these pressing issues. This course is open to all students, but will be required for the new Social Policy Minor. The course is also recommended for students who are interested in law school, medical school, programs in public health, and graduate school in related social science fields. This course does not count as one of the required courses for the Economics major or minor, but it is required for the Social Policy Minor. Cross list with Sociology, Economics and Political Science. Freshman, Sophomore and Juniors only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 10:30AM - 11:45AM, T 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Burdick-Will, Julia, Lieberman, Robert C, Morgan, Barbara Anne
  • Room: Virtual Online Shaffer 302
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 12/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Social Policy and Inequality: Baltimore and Beyond
AS.360.247 (03)

This course will introduce students to basic concepts in economics, political science and sociology relevant to the study of social problems and the programs designed to remedy them. It will address the many inequalities in access to education and health care, unequal treatment in the criminal justice system, disparities in income and wealth, and differential access to political power. The focus will be on designing effective policies at the national and local level to address these pressing issues. This course is open to all students, but will be required for the new Social Policy Minor. The course is also recommended for students who are interested in law school, medical school, programs in public health, and graduate school in related social science fields. This course does not count as one of the required courses for the Economics major or minor, but it is required for the Social Policy Minor. Cross list with Sociology, Economics and Political Science. Freshman, Sophomore and Juniors only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 10:30AM - 11:45AM, T 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Burdick-Will, Julia, Lieberman, Robert C, Morgan, Barbara Anne
  • Room: Virtual Online Maryland 109
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 13/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.190.300 (01)Racial Inequality, Policy and Politics in the USW 1:30PM - 4:00PMWeaver, VeslaHodson 216
 
INST-AP
AS.230.154 (01)Freshman Seminar: Gender, Health and AgingTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMAgree, EmilyBloomberg 178
 
AS.230.205 (01)Introduction to Social StatisticsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMReese, Michael Joseph, Jr.Hodson 316
Gilman 377
AS.230.205 (02)Introduction to Social StatisticsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMReese, Michael Joseph, Jr.Hodson 316
Gilman 377
AS.230.213 (01)Social TheoryTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMLevien, MichaelHodson 211
 
INST-PT, GECS-SOCSCI
AS.230.228 (01)Colonialism in Asia and Its Contested LegaciesTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMKuo, Huei-YingGilman 413
 
INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.230.233 (01)Inequality and Social Change in Contemporary ChinaTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMLiang, GuoweiHodson 305
 
AS.230.251 (01)War and State: A Social Science SurveyTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMFang, ZhicaoLatrobe 107
 
AS.230.306 (01)Plagues, Power, and Social ControlT 3:00PM - 5:30PMWhite, Alexandre Ilani ReinBloomberg 168
 
INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM
AS.230.326 (01)Sociology of the Military-Industrial ComplexWF 12:00PM - 1:15PMPayne, Corey RobertBloomberg 278
 
INST-IR, INST-CP
AS.230.335 (01)Medical HumanitarianismTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMNaveh Benjamin, IlilKrieger 300
 
INST-IR, MSCH-HUM
AS.230.342 (01)Resistance, Rebellion, and Revolution in Latin AmericaTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMThornton, ChristyBloomberg 176
 
INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.230.348 (01)Climate Change and SocietyM 1:30PM - 4:00PMLevien, MichaelAmes 218
 
ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP, MSCH-HUM
AS.230.369 (01)Sociology in Economic LifeTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKuo, Huei-YingGilman 413
 
INST-ECON, INST-PT
AS.230.370 (01)Housing and Homelessness in the United StatesTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMGreif, MeredithKrieger 308
 
INST-AP, SPOL-UL
AS.230.385 (01)Schooling, Racial Inequality and Public Policy in AmericaMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMMorgan, Stephen LAmes 234
 
INST-AP, SPOL-UL
AS.230.397 (01)The Political Economy of Drugs and Drug WarsTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMThornton, ChristyKrieger Laverty
 
INST-ECON, INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM
AS.230.405 (01)NeoliberalismT 1:30PM - 4:00PMHung, Ho-FungMergenthaler 526
 
INST-AP, INST-ECON
AS.310.210 (01)Documentary Photography in a Changing ChinaM 1:30PM - 4:00PMHe, GaochaoHodson 313
 
INST-CP
AS.230.341 (02)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PMAgree, EmilyVirtual Online
Maryland 104
PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL, MSCH-HUM
AS.230.430 (01)Sociology of Policing and Resistance in Race-Class Subjugated CommunitiesTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMWeaver, VeslaShaffer 2
 
AS.230.341 (03)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PMAgree, EmilyVirtual Online
Gilman 219
PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL, MSCH-HUM
AS.230.358 (01)The Politics of Mental HealthTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMNaveh Benjamin, IlilKrieger 300
 
MSCH-HUM
AS.360.247 (01)Introduction to Social Policy and Inequality: Baltimore and BeyondTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM, T 10:30AM - 11:45AMBurdick-Will, Julia, Lieberman, Robert C, Morgan, Barbara AnneVirtual Online
Latrobe 107
AS.230.379 (01)Undergraduate Research SeminarT 1:30PM - 4:00PMAndreas, JoelSmokler Center 214
 
AS.230.150 (01)Issues in International DevelopmentW 3:00PM - 5:30PMAgarwala, RinaBloomberg 176
 
GECS-SOCSCI, INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON, ENVS-MAJOR
AS.230.341 (05)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PMAgree, EmilyVirtual Online
Croft Hall G02
PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL, MSCH-HUM
AS.230.341 (01)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PMAgree, EmilyVirtual Online
Gilman 219
PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL, MSCH-HUM
AS.230.341 (04)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PMAgree, EmilyVirtual Online
Maryland 104
PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL, MSCH-HUM
AS.360.401 (01)Social Policy SeminarTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMGreif, MeredithShaffer 2
 
AS.360.247 (02)Introduction to Social Policy and Inequality: Baltimore and BeyondTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM, T 10:30AM - 11:45AMBurdick-Will, Julia, Lieberman, Robert C, Morgan, Barbara AnneVirtual Online
Shaffer 302
AS.360.247 (03)Introduction to Social Policy and Inequality: Baltimore and BeyondTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM, T 10:30AM - 11:45AMBurdick-Will, Julia, Lieberman, Robert C, Morgan, Barbara AnneVirtual Online
Maryland 109