Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

FYS: Cults, Communes, and Conspiracies
AS.001.136 (01)

Cults, communes, and conspiracies are unusual social and ideological organizations. How should we understand their origins, structure, and functioning? In our First-Year Seminar, we will assess the value of alternative explanatory concepts from the social sciences, such as charismatic leadership, organizational ecology, network structure, status competition, social influence, and belief propagation. We will then interpret cases in comparative perspective, asking, for example, how cults differ from religious sects, how communes differ from political movements, and how organized crime groups differ from legal businesses.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Morgan, Steve L
  • Room: Mergenthaler 526  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

FYS: Citizenship and Society in the United States
AS.001.151 (01)

Popular sovereignty — the idea that the people rule themselves — has been heralded as one of the preeminent innovations of the modern world. And over the course of the last two hundred or so years, a rising tide of nations committed themselves to the principles of popular sovereignty. Yet in recent years, the inevitability, soundness, and very viability of "rule by the people" has come into question. On the one hand, popular uprisings around the globe have rejected the decisions and practices of governing elites on the grounds that they are out of touch with the people’s needs. On the other hand, these uprisings have resurrected and strengthened authoritarian practices and have facilitated the erosion of liberal rights long considered instrumental to preserving democracy. The result — turmoil, unrest, and uncertainty about what the future holds — is evident from Venezuela to England, Turkey to the United States. Can popular sovereignty survive? In what form will the people rule, and at what cost? This First-Year Seminar is an investigation into the idea and practice of popular sovereignty in the contemporary United States. We will explore this topic by actively consulting theory and empirical research in the social sciences. We will supplement this with our own research on the 2022 election, media coverage of issues, popular attitudes about democracy, and popular representation in government and by interest/advocacy groups. Additionally, this class is organized as a collaboration between two first-year seminars: one at Johns Hopkins, the other at Williams College. Over the course of the semester, the two seminars will meet frequently via videoconference to share research and discuss readings and ideas. This is intended to broaden the perspectives brought to bear on our investigation generally and, specifically, to allow each group to share real time research on the politics of the region in which their respective institutions are located.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Perrin, Andrew Jonathan
  • Room: Mergenthaler 266  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

FYS: The Psychology of Mass Politics in the U.S.
AS.001.168 (01)

Taught during the election season of 2022, this First-Year Seminar looks at the deeper psychological motivations of the American electorate. We begin by discussing the meaning of democracy and establishing a common understanding of American democracy specifically, placing the current moment into historical and international context. We then gradually dismantle the "folk theory" of democracy that assumes all voters are rational and economically-minded. Instead, we apply theories from social psychology to understand some essential questions about voter behavior. Why do people vote? How do they understand politics? How are their feelings and judgments affected by their own identities, biases, information sources, and by the messages they hear from leaders? Why have Americans grown so polarized? What role do racial and gender-based prejudice play? Is American politics headed toward a more violent future? We use evidence-based research from political science, sociology, and psychology to answer these questions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room: Mergenthaler 266  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

FYS: Gender x Aging x Health in America
AS.001.187 (01)

In this First-Year Seminar students will develop an understanding of the ways in which gender structures health and well being through adulthood and later life. The experience of sexual minorities and the intersection of gender with class and ethnicity will also be discussed. Students will be expected to participate actively and lead discussions on specific topics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Agree, Emily
  • Room: Jenkins 102  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (01)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Calder, Ryan
  • Room: Gilman 50 Bloomberg 276
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (02)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Calder, Ryan
  • Room: Gilman 50 Maryland 104
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (03)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Calder, Ryan
  • Room: Gilman 50 Maryland 104
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (04)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Calder, Ryan
  • Room: Gilman 50 Gilman 277
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (05)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Calder, Ryan
  • Room: Gilman 50 Maryland 114
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (06)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Calder, Ryan
  • Room: Gilman 50 Maryland 114
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (07)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Calder, Ryan
  • Room: Gilman 50 Maryland 202
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (08)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Calder, Ryan
  • Room: Gilman 50 Gilman 219
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (09)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Calder, Ryan
  • Room: Gilman 50 Gilman 219
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Social Statistics
AS.230.205 (01)

This course will introduce students to the application of statistical techniques commonly used in sociological analysis. Topics include measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability theory, confidence intervals, chi-square, anova, and regression analysis. Hands-on computer experience with statistical software and analysis of data from various fields of social research. Special Note: Required for IS GSCD track students.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Reese, Mike J
  • Room: Virtual Online Shaffer 1
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Social Statistics
AS.230.205 (02)

This course will introduce students to the application of statistical techniques commonly used in sociological analysis. Topics include measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability theory, confidence intervals, chi-square, anova, and regression analysis. Hands-on computer experience with statistical software and analysis of data from various fields of social research. Special Note: Required for IS GSCD track students.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Reese, Mike J
  • Room: Virtual Online Shaffer 1
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Social Theory
AS.230.213 (01)

This course will focus on four classical social theorists whose ideas have greatly influenced how we study and understand society: Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim, Max Weber and W.E.B. DuBois. Students will gain an in-depth understanding of how each theorist answered three major questions: 1) what is the origin, structure and historical dynamic of modern society?; 2) how do we gain an accurate knowledge of society?; 3) what are the conditions of possibility for freedom in modern society? In comparing, applying and critiquing their respective theories, students will advance their own theory of society.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Levien, Michael
  • Room: Gilman 377  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

The Sociology of Intimate Partnerships: Dating, Mating, Marriage, and Divorce
AS.230.236 (01)

How do we define an intimate partnership and what role does it play in society? At the turn of the 20th Century socially sanctioned intimate partnerships existed primarily in the context of marriage between a man and a woman. These partnerships formed the center of family units and provided a foundation of social stability for the individuals that entered them. Since then, additional forms of intimate partnerships have become more widely accepted through dating and cohabitation, while marriage has become less stable. In this course, we will explore the evolution of marriage as the dominant type of intimate partnership in society and the concurrent rise of dating, cohabitation, and divorce. Using the context of how these intimate partnerships have changed in recent decades, students will explore and define the role these different types of partnerships serve in society today.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Miller, Rhiannon Nicole
  • Room: Krieger Laverty  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Race and Racism
AS.230.242 (01)

Race has been important in social classifications and producing inequalities. This course is designed to provide you with a global understanding of how racial categories are created and maintained, how they change over time, and how they vary from place to place. It is organized in four parts. The first part introduces the concepts and analytical tools used by social scientists to study race. Of particular concern is power and the social construction rather than “natural” categories of race, as well as the general social processes involved in the maintenance and reproduction of these boundaries. In the second part, we will study the theories and dynamics racial category formation in the United States with attention to forms and processes of racial exclusion and oppression, and evidence of socio-economic inequalities based on race. In the third part of the course, we will compare these processes in the U.S. to those occurring in other countries. The fourth and final part of the course examines how race and racism shape political struggles and resistance movements.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room: Shriver Hall 001  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Space, Place, Poverty & Race: Sociological Perspectives on Neighborhoods & Public Housing
AS.230.313 (01)

Recent national conversations about racial segregation, inequality and the affordable housing crisis raise many important questions—this course focuses on several of these questions, through the lens of urban sociology and housing policy. There are three main areas we will focus on in the course: 1) Understanding the role of racial segregation, neighborhood and housing effects on children and family life; 2) Research methods for studying urban poverty and neighborhoods; and 3) Programs, policies and initiatives designed to house the poor, alleviate concentrated spatial poverty, and increase residential choice. We will primarily focus on issues related to urban poverty in large cities, comparing the patterns of residential mobility and neighborhood characteristics for white and Black Americans. We will utilize archival data, qualitative interviews, census data, and quasi/experimental data to gather evidence about neighborhoods, housing, and policies, as well as their impacts. We will also explore interactive online applications that facilitate the study of neighborhoods (e.g. American Community Survey, GIS with Social Explorer). A statistics/public policy background is helpful, but not required.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Deluca, Stefanie
  • Room: Krieger 180  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Sociology of Immigration
AS.230.317 (01)

This course surveys sociological theories and research on immigration to the U.S. Theoretical approaches include theories of international migration, economic sociology, immigration, and assimilation. Research topics include the impact of U.S. immigration laws and policies on immigrant inflows and stocks, self-selection of immigrants, the impact of immigration on the native-born population and the U.S. labor market and economy, and the adaptation of the first and second generations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Hao, Lingxin
  • Room: Gilman 217  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Global Social Change and Development Practicum
AS.230.325 (01)

This course provides "hands on" research experience in the field of global social change and development. The course fulfills the "research practicum" requirement for Sociology majors and is required for the GSCD track.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Silver, BEVERLY Judith
  • Room: Shaffer 304  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Sociology of Revolution and Counterrevolution
AS.230.327 (01)

In this course, students will learn about analyzing revolutionary and counterrevolutionary movements, with a focus on their strategic dimensions. Contributions from the military, counterinsurgency, sociology of revolution, historical materialist, world-system, and critical realist literature will provide different visions of strategy and tactics. The cases of Guatemala and Chile in the early 1980s and 1970s, respectively, will provide historical and empirical roots to class discussions about these different approaches and the possibilities of synthesizing them.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Link Chaparro, Sebastian Eduardo
  • Room: Smokler Center 213  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Medical Humanitarianism
AS.230.335 (01)

Humanitarian organizations play life-preserving roles in global conflicts, and have front-row views of disasters ranging from the 2010 Haiti earthquake to the 2011 Fukushima tsunami in Japan. Yet even while they provide vital assistance to millions of people in crisis, such organizations are beset by important paradoxes that hinder their capacity to create sustainable interventions. They work to fill long-lasting needs, but are prone to moving quickly from one site to the next in search of the latest emergency. They strive to be apolitical, yet are invariably influenced by the geopolitical agendas of global powers. How do such contradictions arise, and what is their impact upon millions of aid recipients around the world? Drawing on case studies from South Sudan to Haiti, this course addresses these contradictions by exploring how and why medical aid organizations attempt, and sometimes fail, to reconcile short-term goals, such as immediate life-saving, with long-term missions, such as public health programs and conflict resolution initiatives.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Naveh Benjamin, Ilil
  • Room: Bloomberg 178  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, MSCH-HUM

Sociology of Health and Illness
AS.230.341 (01)

This course introduces students to medical sociology, which is the application of the sociological perspective to health and health care. Major topics include stress, social epidemiology, and the social organization of health care.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Agree, Emily
  • Room: Krieger 205 Latrobe 107
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL, MSCH-HUM

Sociology of Health and Illness
AS.230.341 (02)

This course introduces students to medical sociology, which is the application of the sociological perspective to health and health care. Major topics include stress, social epidemiology, and the social organization of health care.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Agree, Emily
  • Room: Krieger 205 Maryland 217
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL, MSCH-HUM

Sociology of Health and Illness
AS.230.341 (03)

This course introduces students to medical sociology, which is the application of the sociological perspective to health and health care. Major topics include stress, social epidemiology, and the social organization of health care.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PM
  • Instructor: Agree, Emily
  • Room: Krieger 205 Shaffer 2
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL, MSCH-HUM

Sociology of Health and Illness
AS.230.341 (04)

This course introduces students to medical sociology, which is the application of the sociological perspective to health and health care. Major topics include stress, social epidemiology, and the social organization of health care.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PM
  • Instructor: Agree, Emily
  • Room: Krieger 205 Latrobe 107
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL, MSCH-HUM

Climate Change and Society
AS.230.348 (01)

This course will focus on the social dimensions of climate change. Drawing on global and multi-disciplinary scholarship, we will address such issues as: the history of fossil capitalism; the relationship between social inequality and “vulnerability” to climate change (including heat waves, drought, rising seas, and extreme weather); climate migration and the political economy of “adaptation”; the merits of various mitigation strategies, including the Green New Deal, conservation offsets, and geo-engineering; the roots of climate denialism; and climate justice movements. Students will write a final research paper on a sociological aspect of climate change.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Levien, Michael
  • Room: Gilman 400  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP, MSCH-HUM

Power, Privilege, and Inequality
AS.230.356 (01)

Race, class and gender are among key factors in systematic patterns of inequality in the United States (and globally). In this course, we examine the manner in which social inequality comes about and is maintained through a range of social institutions and daily social interactions. This class will examine how social institutions and daily social interactions structure the decisions individuals make and, in turn, how the decisions that individuals make serve to perpetuate or challenge existing social institutions and interactions. We will explore how the intersection of different forms of inequality, for example race and class or class and gender challenge traditional conceptions of inequality and provide insight into the processes that perpetuate inequality. We will use these sociological tools to develop what sociologist C. Wright Mills calls the "sociological imagination" and apply this imagination to contemporary debates in American society. We will discuss how the sociological imagination differs from the approach other disciplines in social science might take to study inequality.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Bader, Michael David
  • Room: Gilman 75  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Sociology in Economic Life
AS.230.369 (01)

This course discusses how geopolitics, technology as well as social differentiation (such as race, class and gender) shape the structure of economic actions. Special attention will be paid to patterns of state-business relationship, labor processes, migrant economy, globalization and international division of labor.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Kuo, Huei-Ying
  • Room: Bloomberg 276  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, INST-PT

Housing and Homelessness in the United States
AS.230.370 (01)

This course will examine the role of housing, or the absence thereof, in shaping quality of life. It will explore the consequences of the places in which we live and how we are housed. Consideration will be given to overcrowding, affordability, accessibility, and past and existing housing policies and their influence on society. Special attention will be given to the problem of homelessness.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Greif, Meredith
  • Room: Gilman 186  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, SPOL-UL

Housing and Homelessness in the United States
AS.230.370 (02)

This course will examine the role of housing, or the absence thereof, in shaping quality of life. It will explore the consequences of the places in which we live and how we are housed. Consideration will be given to overcrowding, affordability, accessibility, and past and existing housing policies and their influence on society. Special attention will be given to the problem of homelessness.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Greif, Meredith
  • Room: Gilman 186  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, SPOL-UL

Refugees, Human Rights, and Sovereignty
AS.230.378 (01)

What is a refugee? Since World War II, states that have pledged to offer protection to refugees have frequently been drawn instead to the dictates of nationalism and communitarianism, which prioritize concern for their own citizens, rather than to the needs of forced migrants. As a result, even those migrants that have been formally recognized as refugees according to the 1951 UN Refugee Convention have not been assured of protection, and other migrants have been even less assured. In this course, we will locate the reasons for this reality in the legal, political, and historical underpinnings of political asylum. What is the difference between an asylum seeker and a refugee? How has the refugee category been redefined and contested by international bodies since 1951? How are the ambiguities of real-life violence and persecution simplified in asylum adjudication interviews that require clear, factual narratives? What kinds of protections are offered to asylum seekers, whether by UN bodies, NGOs, or host governments, and how have such protections varied geographically and historically? Finally, what protections, if any, are afforded to those migrants who are fleeing not persecution but rather “merely” endemic poverty or climate-induced displacement? The course draws on literature from sociology, history, anthropology, and international refugee law in order to understand the capacity (or lack thereof) of human rights discourses and declarations to contravene state sovereignty in the name of protecting the rightless.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Naveh Benjamin, Ilil
  • Room: Bloomberg 178  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-IR

The Making of the Asian Races Across the Pacific in the Long 20th Century
AS.230.386 (01)

Focusing on the race-makings of the Asians across the Pacific in the long twentieth century, the course employs the reading materials that elucidate the constructions about the demographic categories of the Asian "races." We use prewar Japanese materials and Chinese nationalist thoughts to elaborate on the following themes: the internal distinction among the peoples grouped under the racial category of the Asians; the overall presentation about the generic category of the "Asian" peoplehood, as well as their alleged shared civilization and interests. The theoretical framework include concepts of capitalist reconfiguration of social boundaries through racism and the question of power behind the reproduction of racial hierarchy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Kuo, Huei-Ying
  • Room: Bloomberg 276  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Social Statistics
AS.230.394 (01)

The application of statistical techniques commonly used in sociological analysis. Topics include measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability theory, confidence intervals, chi-square, anova, and regression analysis. Hands-on computer experience with statistical software and analysis of data from various fields of social research.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Reese, Mike J
  • Room: Virtual Online Shaffer 1
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/3
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Social Statistics
AS.230.394 (02)

The application of statistical techniques commonly used in sociological analysis. Topics include measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability theory, confidence intervals, chi-square, anova, and regression analysis. Hands-on computer experience with statistical software and analysis of data from various fields of social research.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Reese, Mike J
  • Room: Virtual Online Shaffer 1
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/3
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Politics and Society
AS.230.396 (01)

This seminar surveys key problems of political sociology including the rise of the modern state, the origins and nature of liberal democracy, sources of authority, the relationship between political and economic power, the nation-state and nationalism, states and war, ideology and political contention, collective identity, social movements, and social revolutions. Fulfills Comparative Politics for International Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Andreas, Joel
  • Room: Mergenthaler 526  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/10
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-PT

Racial Capitalism: A Sociological Perspective
AS.230.418 (01)

This course provides theoretical and historical approaches to examining the centrality of racism, imperialism, and colonialism to the origins and ongoing functioning of capitalism and the global political economy. We begin with the dominant theoretical frameworks used to study capitalism and carefully juxtapose these with theory and empirical analyses foregrounding capitalism’s connections to racial slavery/racialized labor exploitation, imperialism, colonialism, and gendered exploitation. Following this, we examine the unfolding of capitalism in the post-emancipation, post-independence, and neoliberal periods, paying close attention to inequalities produced within and between nations. We end by examining resistance to racial capitalism, as well as imagining alternative futures.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room: Krieger 302  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Sociology of Policing and Resistance in Race-Class Subjugated Communities
AS.230.430 (01)

Policing has become a primary way that many Americans see and experience government, particularly those from race-class subjugated communities, and has been a site of resistance and freedom struggles since the first Reconstruction. In this undergraduate seminar, we will survey key debates around policing and social movements, with a particular focus on research that takes institutional development, history, and racial orders seriously. A core preoccupation of this course will be to understand the ways in which policing “makes race” and how debates about crime, surveillance, and safety were often debates about black inclusion and equality. We will explore changes in the racial logics of policing over time, debates over how policing helped construct the racial order, and the consequences of several shifts in policing for communities. From broken windows policing in New York to the emergence of the new vagrancy-style banishment laws in urban Seattle to the men who live under constant surveillance in Philadelphia and to the large share of blacks in Ferguson with outstanding warrants for ‘failure to appear”, these policies and policing regimes have helped remake the government in the eyes of the urban poor. How does exposure to criminal justice interventions shape political learning, racial lifeworlds, and community social capital? The course will include a range of methods (ethnography, historical analysis, quantitative and qualitative).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Weaver, Vesla
  • Room: Krieger 302  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Sociology of Religion
AS.230.445 (01)

This seminar tackles major issues in the classical and contemporary sociology of religion. We begin with Ibn Khaldun, Friedrich Nietzsche, Karl Marx, Max Weber, Émile Durkheim, and Mary Douglas, asking basic questions: What are religion and the sacred? Why do they exist? What is the relationship between religion and social structure? And what role does religion play in morality, solidarity, boundaries, exploitation, patriarchy, and macrohistorical transformations such as the rise of capitalism? Keeping this theoretical grounding (and its flaws and biases) in mind, we continue to probe the problem of religion in modernity through more-recent writings. Topics include the secularization debate (Are modernity and religion antithetical?); “religious markets” and rational-choice theories of religion; religious revivalism, evangelicalism, fundamentalism, and proselytizing movements; feminist and queer sociologies of religion; civil religion (Is standing for the national anthem a religious act?); embodiment and prayer; Orientalism and postcolonial interrogations of the secular; religious violence and nationalism; the intersectionality of religion with race, class, and caste; and religion and neoliberalism. Although dominant sociologies of religion have focused on Christianity in Western Europe and North America, this course applies a global lens, training significant focus on non-Western and non-Christian contexts.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Calder, Ryan
  • Room: Mergenthaler 526  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/14
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-PT, INST-GLOBAL

Labor Politics in China
AS.310.326 (01)

This course explores the transformation of labor relations in China over the past century. It will cover the origins of the labor movement, the changes brought about by the 1949 Revolution, the industrial battles of the Cultural Revolution, the traumatic restructuring of state-owned enterprises over the past two decades, the rise of private enterprise and export-oriented industry, the conditions faced by migrant workers today, and recent developments in industrial relations and labor conflict. The course is designed for upper division undergraduates and graduate students. Cross-listed with Sociology and International Studies (CP).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: He, Gaochao
  • Room: Gilman 119  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-ECON

Introduction to Police and Prisons
AS.362.115 (01)

This introductory course will examine policing and prisons in the United States and beyond, with a focus on racial inequality. It will consist of three parts. First, we will define key concepts in police and prison studies. Then, we will explore the contemporary state of prisons and policing in the United States and look at debates around the rise of “mass incarceration” and aggressive forms of policing in the final third of the 20th century. Third, we will explore policing and prison in other parts of the globe in the contemporary moment, highlighting similarities and differences from the U.S. case. What can studying the instruments of social control in other societies reveal about our own? Students will develop an understanding of major trends, keywords, and debates in the literature on policing and prisons, with particular reference to race and racism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Schrader, Stuart Laurence
  • Room: Maryland 202  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-AP

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.001.136 (01)FYS: Cults, Communes, and ConspiraciesT 3:00PM - 5:30PMMorgan, Steve LMergenthaler 526
 
AS.001.151 (01)FYS: Citizenship and Society in the United StatesTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMPerrin, Andrew JonathanMergenthaler 266
 
AS.001.168 (01)FYS: The Psychology of Mass Politics in the U.S.W 3:00PM - 5:30PMStaffMergenthaler 266
 
AS.001.187 (01)FYS: Gender x Aging x Health in AmericaW 1:30PM - 4:00PMAgree, EmilyJenkins 102
 
AS.230.101 (01)Introduction to SociologyMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMCalder, RyanGilman 50
Bloomberg 276
AS.230.101 (02)Introduction to SociologyMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMCalder, RyanGilman 50
Maryland 104
AS.230.101 (03)Introduction to SociologyMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMCalder, RyanGilman 50
Maryland 104
AS.230.101 (04)Introduction to SociologyMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMCalder, RyanGilman 50
Gilman 277
AS.230.101 (05)Introduction to SociologyMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMCalder, RyanGilman 50
Maryland 114
AS.230.101 (06)Introduction to SociologyMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMCalder, RyanGilman 50
Maryland 114
AS.230.101 (07)Introduction to SociologyMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMCalder, RyanGilman 50
Maryland 202
AS.230.101 (08)Introduction to SociologyMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMCalder, RyanGilman 50
Gilman 219
AS.230.101 (09)Introduction to SociologyMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMCalder, RyanGilman 50
Gilman 219
AS.230.205 (01)Introduction to Social StatisticsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMReese, Mike JVirtual Online
Shaffer 1
AS.230.205 (02)Introduction to Social StatisticsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMReese, Mike JVirtual Online
Shaffer 1
AS.230.213 (01)Social TheoryMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMLevien, MichaelGilman 377
 
INST-PT
AS.230.236 (01)The Sociology of Intimate Partnerships: Dating, Mating, Marriage, and DivorceMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMMiller, Rhiannon NicoleKrieger Laverty
 
MSCH-HUM
AS.230.242 (01)Race and RacismTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMStaffShriver Hall 001
 
INST-AP
AS.230.313 (01)Space, Place, Poverty & Race: Sociological Perspectives on Neighborhoods & Public HousingW 3:00PM - 5:30PMDeluca, StefanieKrieger 180
 
AS.230.317 (01)Sociology of ImmigrationMW 4:30PM - 5:45PMHao, LingxinGilman 217
 
INST-IR
AS.230.325 (01)Global Social Change and Development PracticumTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMSilver, BEVERLY JudithShaffer 304
 
AS.230.327 (01)Sociology of Revolution and CounterrevolutionMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMLink Chaparro, Sebastian EduardoSmokler Center 213
 
INST-CP
AS.230.335 (01)Medical HumanitarianismTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMNaveh Benjamin, IlilBloomberg 178
 
INST-IR, MSCH-HUM
AS.230.341 (01)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PMAgree, EmilyKrieger 205
Latrobe 107
PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL, MSCH-HUM
AS.230.341 (02)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PMAgree, EmilyKrieger 205
Maryland 217
PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL, MSCH-HUM
AS.230.341 (03)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PMAgree, EmilyKrieger 205
Shaffer 2
PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL, MSCH-HUM
AS.230.341 (04)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PMAgree, EmilyKrieger 205
Latrobe 107
PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL, MSCH-HUM
AS.230.348 (01)Climate Change and SocietyT 1:30PM - 4:00PMLevien, MichaelGilman 400
 
ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP, MSCH-HUM
AS.230.356 (01)Power, Privilege, and InequalityT 4:30PM - 7:00PMBader, Michael DavidGilman 75
 
INST-AP
AS.230.369 (01)Sociology in Economic LifeTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMKuo, Huei-YingBloomberg 276
 
INST-ECON, INST-PT
AS.230.370 (01)Housing and Homelessness in the United StatesTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMGreif, MeredithGilman 186
 
INST-AP, SPOL-UL
AS.230.370 (02)Housing and Homelessness in the United StatesTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMGreif, MeredithGilman 186
 
INST-AP, SPOL-UL
AS.230.378 (01)Refugees, Human Rights, and SovereigntyTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMNaveh Benjamin, IlilBloomberg 178
 
INST-GLOBAL, INST-IR
AS.230.386 (01)The Making of the Asian Races Across the Pacific in the Long 20th CenturyTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKuo, Huei-YingBloomberg 276
 
INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.230.394 (01)Social StatisticsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMReese, Mike JVirtual Online
Shaffer 1
AS.230.394 (02)Social StatisticsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMReese, Mike JVirtual Online
Shaffer 1
AS.230.396 (01)Politics and SocietyTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMAndreas, JoelMergenthaler 526
 
INST-CP, INST-PT
AS.230.418 (01)Racial Capitalism: A Sociological PerspectiveT 1:30PM - 4:00PMStaffKrieger 302
 
INST-ECON
AS.230.430 (01)Sociology of Policing and Resistance in Race-Class Subjugated CommunitiesTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMWeaver, VeslaKrieger 302
 
AS.230.445 (01)Sociology of ReligionW 4:30PM - 7:00PMCalder, RyanMergenthaler 526
 
INST-CP, INST-PT, INST-GLOBAL
AS.310.326 (01)Labor Politics in ChinaW 4:30PM - 7:00PMHe, GaochaoGilman 119
 
INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-ECON
AS.362.115 (01)Introduction to Police and PrisonsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMSchrader, Stuart LaurenceMaryland 202
 
INST-CP, INST-AP