Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Issues in International Development
AS.230.150 (01)

Why do billions of people continue to live in poverty? What obstacles stand in the way of secure and dignified lives for all? Who is most likely to bring about change, what strategies should they follow, and what kinds of institutions should they put in place? This course will introduce the main theoretical perspectives, debates, and themes in the field of international development since the mid-20th century. It has three sections. The first section focuses on debates over the optimal conditions and strategies for generating economic growth and on the relationship between growth, human welfare, and inequality. The second section presents critical assessments of development interventions from various perspectives. The third section considers the role of social movements in shaping development and social change in the 21st century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Thornton, Christy
  • Room: Ames 234
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON

Issues in International Development
AS.230.150 (02)

Why do billions of people continue to live in poverty? What obstacles stand in the way of secure and dignified lives for all? Who is most likely to bring about change, what strategies should they follow, and what kinds of institutions should they put in place? This course will introduce the main theoretical perspectives, debates, and themes in the field of international development since the mid-20th century. It has three sections. The first section focuses on debates over the optimal conditions and strategies for generating economic growth and on the relationship between growth, human welfare, and inequality. The second section presents critical assessments of development interventions from various perspectives. The third section considers the role of social movements in shaping development and social change in the 21st century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Thornton, Christy
  • Room: Ames 234
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/13
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON

Issues in International Development
AS.230.150 (03)

Why do billions of people continue to live in poverty? What obstacles stand in the way of secure and dignified lives for all? Who is most likely to bring about change, what strategies should they follow, and what kinds of institutions should they put in place? This course will introduce the main theoretical perspectives, debates, and themes in the field of international development since the mid-20th century. It has three sections. The first section focuses on debates over the optimal conditions and strategies for generating economic growth and on the relationship between growth, human welfare, and inequality. The second section presents critical assessments of development interventions from various perspectives. The third section considers the role of social movements in shaping development and social change in the 21st century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Thornton, Christy
  • Room: Ames 234
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON

Issues in International Development
AS.230.150 (04)

Why do billions of people continue to live in poverty? What obstacles stand in the way of secure and dignified lives for all? Who is most likely to bring about change, what strategies should they follow, and what kinds of institutions should they put in place? This course will introduce the main theoretical perspectives, debates, and themes in the field of international development since the mid-20th century. It has three sections. The first section focuses on debates over the optimal conditions and strategies for generating economic growth and on the relationship between growth, human welfare, and inequality. The second section presents critical assessments of development interventions from various perspectives. The third section considers the role of social movements in shaping development and social change in the 21st century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Thornton, Christy
  • Room: Ames 234
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/13
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON

Race and Ethnicity in American Society
AS.230.244 (01)

Race and ethnicity have played a prominent role in American society and continue to do so, as demonstrated by interracial and interethnic gaps in economic and educational achievement, residence, political power, family structure, crime, and health. Using a sociological framework, we will explore the historical significance of race and its development as a social construction, assess the causes and consequences of intergroup inequalities and explore potential solutions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Greif, Meredith
  • Room: Hodson 203
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, MSCH-HUM

Education & Inequality: Individual, Contextual, and Policy Perspectives
AS.230.320 (01)

What is the function and purpose of schooling in modern society? Is education the "great equalizer" in America, or does family background mostly predict where people end up in life? What can we do to improve educational attainment? This course is designed to tackle such questions and develop the ability of students to think critically, theoretically, historically and empirically about debates in the sociology of education. The course will also cover additional topics, including: racial and economic differences in educational attainment; school segregation; the rise of for-profit education; how college matters. In addition to reading empirical studies and theoretical work, the relevance of education research for policy-making will be emphasized throughout the course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Deluca, Stefanie
  • Room: Abel Wolman House 100
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Chinese Diaspora: Networks and Identity
AS.230.352 (01)

This course surveys the relationship between China and Chinese overseas from the mid-nineteenth century onwards. It highlights the transnational foundation of modern Chinese nationalism. It also compares the divergent formations of the Chinese question in North America and postcolonial Southeast Asia.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Kuo, Huei-Ying
  • Room: Smokler Center 301
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP

Public Opinion and Democracy
AS.230.365 (01)

How does public opinion shape electoral behavior and the contours of democracy in the United States, and how have these relationships changed as techniques for measuring public opinion have evolved since the early twentieth century? To consider this question, the course introduces alternative perspectives on the features of a healthy democracy, including both historical perspectives and current arguments. Interweaved with this material, the course examines how public opinion is measured and interpreted by private pollsters, survey researchers, and data journalists. Emphasis is placed on the alternative claims that opposing analysts adopt, as well as how the technologies of data collection and analysis shape the permissibility of conclusions. Students will learn to interpret public opinion patterns, which requires a brief presentation of basic concepts from survey sampling, including what to make of the polling industry’s most boring concept: margin of error.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Morgan, Stephen L
  • Room: Gilman 313
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Contemporary Social Theory
AS.230.395 (01)

What is the structure of society, how does it change, and how is it reproduced? What is the relation between social structures and our ideas about them? What are the conditions of possibility for human freedom? This course will examine how social theorists have advanced novel answers to these questions as they grappled with the historical events and social concerns of the 20th and 21st centuries. This semester there will be a particular focus on the social theories of Antonio Gramsci, Pierre Bourdieu, Michel Foucault, Nancy Fraser and Stuart Hall. In addition to understanding and comparing theories, we will assess their usefulness for understanding our present conjuncture with a particular emphasis on right-wing extremism and the relationship between racism and capitalism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Levien, Michael
  • Room: Hodson 313
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-PT

Port Cities and Historical Capitalism in Maritime Asia
AS.230.440 (01)

This seminar examines inter-regional connections and diplomacy in maritime Asia (focusing on the region around the Straits of Malacca, South and East China Seas, and the Taiwan Straits). In addition to a survey of world-system theories on Asia, the reading materials cover the maritime silk road, Chinese tribute trade system, British free-trade imperialism, American open-door policy, Japanese pan-Asianism, Cold-war diplomacy, and the Beijing-led Belt-and-Road Initiatives. The goal is to explore the prospects and limitations of examining East and Southeast Asia beyond the inter-state framework.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Kuo, Huei-Ying
  • Room: Smokler Center 301
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL

Black Against Empire
AS.362.315 (01)

This course will examine the confrontation of Black social movements with imperialism in the twentieth century. How, we will ask, have key Black internationalist thinkers conceptualized and defined diaspora, capitalism, imperialism, war, and the global? What have been the effects of war and repression, as well as economic growth and globalization, on Black internationalism? Readings may include texts by W.E.B. Du Bois, Angela Y. Davis, Frantz Fanon, Ashley Farmer, Claudia Jones, Robin D.G. Kelley, Claude McKay, Huey P. Newton, Walter Rodney, Malcolm X, etc. Students will complete a research paper on a topic of their own choosing related to Black internationalism in the twentieth century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Schrader, Stuart Laurence
  • Room: Bloomberg 176
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-AP, INST-CP

Unlocking Knowledge: Theorizing Prison from the Inside
AS.362.335 (01)

What can we learn about mass incarceration, and social life in the USA more broadly, when we listen to incarcerated people themselves? This course centers the voices, experiences, and expertise of the incarcerated and will combine scholarly readings on life inside prisons with a range of writings by incarcerated people. Topics of discussion may include censorship, rehabilitation, Covid-19, solitary confinement, sexuality, racism, etc. Students will learn to probe primary-source collections to amplify silenced and overlooked voices, while completing a multi-stage research project. Prior course experience on mass incarceration preferred.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Furnas, Heather; Schrader, Stuart Laurence
  • Room: Gilman 277
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/16
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (05)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Perrin, Andrew Jonathan
  • Room: Remsen Hall 101
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (07)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Perrin, Andrew Jonathan
  • Room: Remsen Hall 101
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (03)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Perrin, Andrew Jonathan
  • Room: Remsen Hall 101
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (06)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Perrin, Andrew Jonathan
  • Room: Remsen Hall 101
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (08)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Perrin, Andrew Jonathan
  • Room: Remsen Hall 101
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (09)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Perrin, Andrew Jonathan
  • Room: Remsen Hall 101
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (10)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Perrin, Andrew Jonathan
  • Room: Remsen Hall 101
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (04)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Perrin, Andrew Jonathan
  • Room: Remsen Hall 101
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (01)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Perrin, Andrew Jonathan
  • Room: Remsen Hall 101
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (02)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Perrin, Andrew Jonathan
  • Room: Remsen Hall 101
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (11)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Perrin, Andrew Jonathan
  • Room: Remsen Hall 101
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Sociology of Health and Illness
AS.230.341 (02)

This course introduces students to core concepts that define the sociological approach to health, illness and health care. Topics include: health disparities, social context of health and illness, and the Sociology of Medicine.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Agree, Emily
  • Room: Virtual Online
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL

Sociology of Health and Illness
AS.230.341 (04)

This course introduces students to core concepts that define the sociological approach to health, illness and health care. Topics include: health disparities, social context of health and illness, and the Sociology of Medicine.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PM
  • Instructor: Agree, Emily
  • Room: Virtual Online
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL

World Systems Analysis
AS.230.426 (01)

Students will read and discuss classical and contemporary works in the world-systems tradition, with a focus on theories of historical capitalism, global inequality, systemic crises, current social and ecological contradictions and limits, and possible alternative future trajectories.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Silver, BEVERLY Judith
  • Room: Mergenthaler 366
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, INST-PT, INST-IR

Research Methods for the Social Sciences
AS.230.202 (01)

The purpose of this course is to provide a sound introduction to the overall process of research and the specific research methods most frequently used by sociologists and other social scientists. Required for Sociology majors and IS GSCD track students.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Greif, Meredith
  • Room: Wyman Park N105
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Family Demography
AS.230.334 (01)

In this class, we will examine changes in family/household behaviors and relationships from a demographic perspective. We will investigate how culture, economics, and population characteristics can shape family structures, how the role of families has changed in recent decades, and how families are important in people’s lives. We will study diverse familial forms in the U.S. as well as those in the international context. We will study important (and measurable) events in people’s family lives, such as cohabitation, marriage, divorce, and childbearing. We will study how family roles are changing for fathers, mothers, and grandparents. We will also learn about the health implications of various familial relationships. We will use demographic tools and data to compare families across time periods, across social groups, and (to some extent) across countries. You will be doing your own quantitative analyses. You will develop your skills at interpreting and critiquing demographic data that researchers use to support their arguments about the family. You will also develop your skills at making your own accurate and compelling arguments using demographic data.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Chen, Feinian
  • Room: Hodson 305
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Sociology of Health and Illness
AS.230.341 (01)

This course introduces students to core concepts that define the sociological approach to health, illness and health care. Topics include: health disparities, social context of health and illness, and the Sociology of Medicine.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Agree, Emily
  • Room: Virtual Online
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL

Qualitative Research Practicum
AS.230.323 (01)

This course provides "hands on" research experience applying sociological research tools and a sociological perspective to problems of substance. Qualitative observational and/or interviewing methods will be emphasized. Students will design and carry out a research project and write a research report. This course fulfills the "research practicum" requirement for the Sociology major.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Calder, Ryan
  • Room: Gilman 400
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Sociology of Health and Illness
AS.230.341 (03)

This course introduces students to core concepts that define the sociological approach to health, illness and health care. Topics include: health disparities, social context of health and illness, and the Sociology of Medicine.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PM
  • Instructor: Agree, Emily
  • Room: Virtual Online
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.230.150 (01)Issues in International DevelopmentMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMThornton, ChristyAmes 234INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON
AS.230.150 (02)Issues in International DevelopmentMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMThornton, ChristyAmes 234INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON
AS.230.150 (03)Issues in International DevelopmentMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMThornton, ChristyAmes 234INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON
AS.230.150 (04)Issues in International DevelopmentMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMThornton, ChristyAmes 234INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON
AS.230.244 (01)Race and Ethnicity in American SocietyMW 4:30PM - 5:45PMGreif, MeredithHodson 203INST-AP, MSCH-HUM
AS.230.320 (01)Education & Inequality: Individual, Contextual, and Policy PerspectivesT 3:00PM - 5:30PMDeluca, StefanieAbel Wolman House 100INST-AP
AS.230.352 (01)Chinese Diaspora: Networks and IdentityTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMKuo, Huei-YingSmokler Center 301INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP
AS.230.365 (01)Public Opinion and DemocracyTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMMorgan, Stephen LGilman 313INST-AP
AS.230.395 (01)Contemporary Social TheoryM 1:30PM - 4:00PMLevien, MichaelHodson 313INST-CP, INST-PT
AS.230.440 (01)Port Cities and Historical Capitalism in Maritime AsiaTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKuo, Huei-YingSmokler Center 301INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL
AS.362.315 (01)Black Against EmpireMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMSchrader, Stuart LaurenceBloomberg 176INST-GLOBAL, INST-AP, INST-CP
AS.362.335 (01)Unlocking Knowledge: Theorizing Prison from the InsideMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMFurnas, Heather; Schrader, Stuart LaurenceGilman 277INST-AP
AS.230.101 (05)Introduction to SociologyMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMPerrin, Andrew JonathanRemsen Hall 101
AS.230.101 (07)Introduction to SociologyMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMPerrin, Andrew JonathanRemsen Hall 101
AS.230.101 (03)Introduction to SociologyMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMPerrin, Andrew JonathanRemsen Hall 101
AS.230.101 (06)Introduction to SociologyMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMPerrin, Andrew JonathanRemsen Hall 101
AS.230.101 (08)Introduction to SociologyMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMPerrin, Andrew JonathanRemsen Hall 101
AS.230.101 (09)Introduction to SociologyMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMPerrin, Andrew JonathanRemsen Hall 101
AS.230.101 (10)Introduction to SociologyMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMPerrin, Andrew JonathanRemsen Hall 101
AS.230.101 (04)Introduction to SociologyMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMPerrin, Andrew JonathanRemsen Hall 101
AS.230.101 (01)Introduction to SociologyMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMPerrin, Andrew JonathanRemsen Hall 101
AS.230.101 (02)Introduction to SociologyMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMPerrin, Andrew JonathanRemsen Hall 101
AS.230.101 (11)Introduction to SociologyMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMPerrin, Andrew JonathanRemsen Hall 101
AS.230.341 (02)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PMAgree, EmilyVirtual OnlinePHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL
AS.230.341 (04)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PMAgree, EmilyVirtual OnlinePHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL
AS.230.426 (01)World Systems AnalysisW 3:00PM - 5:30PMSilver, BEVERLY JudithMergenthaler 366INST-ECON, INST-PT, INST-IR
AS.230.202 (01)Research Methods for the Social SciencesTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMGreif, MeredithWyman Park N105
AS.230.334 (01)Family DemographyMW 4:30PM - 5:45PMChen, FeinianHodson 305
AS.230.341 (01)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PMAgree, EmilyVirtual OnlinePHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL
AS.230.323 (01)Qualitative Research PracticumM 1:30PM - 4:00PMCalder, RyanGilman 400
AS.230.341 (03)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PMAgree, EmilyVirtual OnlinePHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL