Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

FYS: Public Opinion and Democracy
AS.001.127 (01)

How does public opinion shape electoral behavior and the contours of democracy in the United States, and how have these relationships changed as techniques for measuring public opinion have evolved since the early twentieth century? To consider this question, the course introduces alternative perspectives on the features of a healthy democracy, including both historical perspectives and current arguments. Interweaved with this material, the course examines how public opinion is measured and interpreted by private pollsters, survey researchers, and data journalists. Emphasis is placed on the alternative claims that opposing analysts adopt, as well as how the technologies of data collection and analysis shape the permissibility of conclusions. Students will learn to interpret public opinion patterns, which requires a brief presentation of basic concepts from survey sampling, including what to make of the polling industry’s most boring concept: margin of error.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Morgan, Stephen L (Steve)
  • Room:    
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (01)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Perrin, Andrew J
  • Room: Mudd 26  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (02)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Perrin, Andrew J
  • Room: Mudd 26  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (05)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Perrin, Andrew J
  • Room: Mudd 26  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (06)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Perrin, Andrew J
  • Room: Mudd 26  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (07)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Perrin, Andrew J
  • Room: Mudd 26  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (08)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Perrin, Andrew J
  • Room: Mudd 26  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (09)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Perrin, Andrew J
  • Room: Mudd 26  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (10)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Perrin, Andrew J
  • Room: Mudd 26  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (11)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Perrin, Andrew J
  • Room: Mudd 26  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (12)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Perrin, Andrew J
  • Room: Mudd 26  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Issues in International Development
AS.230.150 (01)

Why do billions of people continue to live in poverty? What obstacles stand in the way of secure and dignified lives for all? Who is most likely to bring about change, what strategies should they follow, and what kinds of institutions should they put in place? This course will introduce the main theoretical perspectives, debates, and themes in the field of international development since the mid-20th century. It has three sections. The first section focuses on debates over the optimal conditions and strategies for generating economic growth and on the relationship between growth, human welfare, and inequality. The second section presents critical assessments of development interventions from various perspectives. The third section considers the role of social movements in shaping development and social change in the 21st century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Thornton, Christy
  • Room: Virtual Online  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 4/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON

Issues in International Development
AS.230.150 (02)

Why do billions of people continue to live in poverty? What obstacles stand in the way of secure and dignified lives for all? Who is most likely to bring about change, what strategies should they follow, and what kinds of institutions should they put in place? This course will introduce the main theoretical perspectives, debates, and themes in the field of international development since the mid-20th century. It has three sections. The first section focuses on debates over the optimal conditions and strategies for generating economic growth and on the relationship between growth, human welfare, and inequality. The second section presents critical assessments of development interventions from various perspectives. The third section considers the role of social movements in shaping development and social change in the 21st century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Thornton, Christy
  • Room: Virtual Online  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 4/13
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON

Issues in International Development
AS.230.150 (03)

Why do billions of people continue to live in poverty? What obstacles stand in the way of secure and dignified lives for all? Who is most likely to bring about change, what strategies should they follow, and what kinds of institutions should they put in place? This course will introduce the main theoretical perspectives, debates, and themes in the field of international development since the mid-20th century. It has three sections. The first section focuses on debates over the optimal conditions and strategies for generating economic growth and on the relationship between growth, human welfare, and inequality. The second section presents critical assessments of development interventions from various perspectives. The third section considers the role of social movements in shaping development and social change in the 21st century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Thornton, Christy
  • Room: Virtual Online  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 3/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON

Issues in International Development
AS.230.150 (04)

Why do billions of people continue to live in poverty? What obstacles stand in the way of secure and dignified lives for all? Who is most likely to bring about change, what strategies should they follow, and what kinds of institutions should they put in place? This course will introduce the main theoretical perspectives, debates, and themes in the field of international development since the mid-20th century. It has three sections. The first section focuses on debates over the optimal conditions and strategies for generating economic growth and on the relationship between growth, human welfare, and inequality. The second section presents critical assessments of development interventions from various perspectives. The third section considers the role of social movements in shaping development and social change in the 21st century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Thornton, Christy
  • Room: Virtual Online  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 5/13
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON

Chinese Revolutions
AS.230.175 (01)

This course introduces the origins, operation and impacts of five major revolutions in modern China between 1850 and 1950. These include the Taiping Rebellion, the republican revolutions, federalist and southern automatic movements, labor strikes as well as peasant rebellions. It draws on the existing historiography that examines China’s transition from an empire to a republic, impacts of western and Japanese influences to China, as well as the continuity and change of Chinese social organizations. Cross list with International Studies and East Asian Studies. Fulfills IS History requirement.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Kuo, Huei-Ying (Huei-Ying)
  • Room:    
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 4/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Inequality and Social Change in Contemporary China
AS.230.233 (01)

This course examines the trajectory of economic development in China since the beginning of market reforms in the late 1970s, with a special focus on social inequality and forms of resistance that have emerged in response to the expansion of the market economy. The first part of the course focuses on understanding the academic debates around China’s economic miracle and introduces students to theories about the relationship between market expansion and social resistance. The second part focuses on key thematic topics including the rural/urban divide, rural protest, urban inequality and labor unrest, gender and sexuality in social movements, environmental protests, and the politics of ethnic relations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Liang, Guowei
  • Room:    
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-ECON

Race and Ethnicity in American Society
AS.230.244 (01)

Race and ethnicity have played a prominent role in American society and continue to do so, as demonstrated by interracial and interethnic gaps in economic and educational achievement, residence, political power, family structure, crime, and health. Using a sociological framework, we will explore the historical significance of race and its development as a social construction, assess the causes and consequences of intergroup inequalities and explore potential solutions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Greif, Meredith (Meredith)
  • Room:    
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Knowledge, Evidence, and Democracy
AS.230.250 (01)

Fake news. Alternative facts. Follow the science. Misinformation. Disinformation. How can we understand the role of information, evidence, and scientific inquiry in politics? Where does information come from? How is it used? How can evidence, argument, and listening improve public conversations? This seminar will examine the connections between information, knowledge, evidence, and democracy, focusing mostly on the United States but with global examples as well.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Perrin, Andrew J
  • Room:    
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, INST-CP, INST-IR

The Political Economy of Modern India
AS.230.318 (01)

This course examines the complex, at times conflicting, relationship that has emerged between Indian seats of power from above and Indian expressions of society from below. Attention will be placed on the period between 1947 to the present.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Agarwala, Rina (Rina)
  • Room:    
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 4/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-ECON

Medical Humanitarianism
AS.230.335 (01)

Humanitarian organizations play life-preserving roles in global conflicts, and have front-row views of disasters ranging from the 2010 Haiti earthquake to the 2011 Fukushima tsunami in Japan. Yet even while they provide vital assistance to millions of people in crisis, such organizations are beset by important paradoxes that hinder their capacity to create sustainable interventions. They work to fill long-lasting needs, but are prone to moving quickly from one site to the next in search of the latest emergency. They strive to be apolitical, yet are invariably influenced by the geopolitical agendas of global powers. How do such contradictions arise, and what is their impact upon millions of aid recipients around the world? Drawing on case studies from South Sudan to Haiti, this course addresses these contradictions by exploring how and why medical aid organizations attempt, and sometimes fail, to reconcile short-term goals, such as immediate life-saving, with long-term missions, such as public health programs and conflict resolution initiatives.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Naveh Benjamin, Ilil
  • Room:    
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/50
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, MSCH-HUM

Global Crises: Past and Present
AS.230.337 (01)

This course will compare the current global crisis with previous major crises of historical capitalism through a combination of theoretical and historical readings. Throughout, we will ask: What can a study of past crises tell us about the nature and future trajectory of the current global crisis? Special emphasis will be placed on (1) “the late-nineteenth century great depression”, (2) the Great Depression of the 1930s, and (3) the period of crisis and stagflation in the 1970s. We will be particularly concerned to understand the differential social and geopolitical impact of the crises. Which social classes bore the brunt of the disruptions in economic activity in each crisis? Which geographical areas or geopolitical groupings lost out (or benefited) from the crisis? How have environmental and ecological challenges resurfaced in each crisis including today?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Silver, Beverly Judith (BEVERLY)
  • Room:    
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-ECON, INST-IR

Sociology of Health and Illness
AS.230.341 (01)

This course introduces students to core concepts that define the sociological approach to health, illness and health care. Topics include: health disparities, social context of health and illness, and the Sociology of Medicine.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Agree, Emily
  • Room: Virtual Online  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL

Sociology of Health and Illness
AS.230.341 (02)

This course introduces students to core concepts that define the sociological approach to health, illness and health care. Topics include: health disparities, social context of health and illness, and the Sociology of Medicine.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Agree, Emily
  • Room: Virtual Online  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL

Sociology of Health and Illness
AS.230.341 (03)

This course introduces students to core concepts that define the sociological approach to health, illness and health care. Topics include: health disparities, social context of health and illness, and the Sociology of Medicine.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PM
  • Instructor: Agree, Emily
  • Room: Virtual Online  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL

Sociology of Health and Illness
AS.230.341 (04)

This course introduces students to core concepts that define the sociological approach to health, illness and health care. Topics include: health disparities, social context of health and illness, and the Sociology of Medicine.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PM
  • Instructor: Agree, Emily
  • Room: Virtual Online  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL

Class, Race, and Political Struggle in Capitalist Societies
AS.230.349 (01)

Does capitalism promote democracy and stability, or repression, racial conflict, and social unrest? Following the 2008 financial crisis, countries around the world have experienced severe economic and political crises, giving rise to explosive movements that have challenged the viability of capitalism and democracy as durable systems. By considering these developments, this course examines the core political dimensions of capitalist societies. We will define and discuss key terms, like capitalism, racial capitalism, the capitalist state, democracy, social movements, and more. We will pay special attention to the ways in which the economic, political, and ideological structures of capitalist societies shape and are shaped by social movements and political parties. The course is global in perspective, drawing on developments in many countries, with a special focus on the United States.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Awatramani, Rishi
  • Room:    
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 6/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON

Chinese Diaspora: Networks and Identity
AS.230.352 (01)

This course combines lecture and class discussion. It examines the history and historiography of Chinese overseas migration. Major issues include overseas Chinese as “merchants without empire,” Chinese exclusion acts in the age of mass migration, the “Chinese question” in postcolonial Southeast Asia, as well as the making and unmaking of Chinese identity in the current wave of globalization.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Kuo, Huei-Ying (Huei-Ying)
  • Room:    
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 5/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP

Islamic Finance
AS.230.367 (01)

Today, Islamic finance is a global industry comprising nearly $3 trillion in assets, with hubs from Kuala Lumpur to Dubai to London. But half a century ago, nothing called “Islamic finance” existed. So where did Islamic finance come from? Why is it growing so fast? And what does it mean for finance to be Islamic? We discuss the ban on usury in Islam and other religious and philosophical traditions, finance in early and medieval Islamic societies, petrodollars and the birth of Islamic banking in the 1970s, the rise of Islamic capital markets since 2000, contemporary shariah-compliant financial structures, and the constitution of piety through financial practice.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Calder, Ryan
  • Room:    
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 9/14
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, ISLM-ISLMST

Refugees, Human Rights, and Sovereignty
AS.230.378 (01)

What is a refugee? Since World War II, states that have pledged to offer protection to refugees have frequently been drawn instead to the dictates of nationalism and communitarianism, which prioritize concern for their own citizens, rather than to the needs of forced migrants. As a result, even those migrants that have been formally recognized as refugees according to the 1951 UN Refugee Convention have not been assured of protection, and other migrants have been even less assured. In this course, we will locate the reasons for this reality in the legal, political, and historical underpinnings of political asylum. What is the difference between an asylum seeker and a refugee? How has the refugee category been redefined and contested by international bodies since 1951? How are the ambiguities of real-life violence and persecution simplified in asylum adjudication interviews that require clear, factual narratives? What kinds of protections are offered to asylum seekers, whether by UN bodies, NGOs, or host governments, and how have such protections varied geographically and historically? Finally, what protections, if any, are afforded to those migrants who are fleeing not persecution but rather “merely” endemic poverty or climate-induced displacement? The course draws on literature from sociology, history, anthropology, and international refugee law in order to understand the capacity (or lack thereof) of human rights discourses and declarations to contravene state sovereignty in the name of protecting the rightless.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Naveh Benjamin, Ilil
  • Room:    
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 4/50
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

The Value of Life: Racism, Capitalism and Health
AS.230.389 (01)

We are generally told that you can't put a price on life or a price on our health but lives are quantified, valued and priced every day. In this class we will explore the ways in which life is valued in the modern world, its effects and the outcomes from it. We will also examine how forms of quantification and valuation have been employed to dehumanize and subjugate peoples, especially those racialized as different. Beginning with an exploration of human pricing during the trans-Atlantic Slave trade and continuing through to contemporary health care and health insurance practices, this course will examine how we value (monetarily) human existence in modernity. This course will introduce students to ideas emerging out of the Black Marxist Tradition, postcolonial thought, and critical feminist approaches to historical research. From the examination of insurance under slavery to the use of race corrections in medical algorithms, this class will confront students with the question- "how can we put a price on life?" and most importantly "Should we?".

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: White, Alexandre Ilani Rein
  • Room:    
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Social Problems in Contemporary China
AS.230.415 (01)

In this course we will examine contemporary Chinese society, looking at economic development, rural transformation, urbanization and migration, labor relations, changes in class structure and family organization, health care, environmental problems, governance, and popular protest. The course is designed for both graduate and undergraduate students. Undergraduates must have already completed a course about China at Hopkins. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Andreas, Joel
  • Room:    
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Sociology of Religion
AS.230.445 (01)

This seminar tackles major issues in the classical and contemporary sociology of religion. We begin with Ibn Khaldun, Friedrich Nietzsche, Karl Marx, Max Weber, Émile Durkheim, and Mary Douglas, asking basic questions: What are religion and the sacred? Why do they exist? What is the relationship between religion and social structure? And what role does religion play in morality, solidarity, boundaries, exploitation, patriarchy, and macrohistorical transformations such as the rise of capitalism? Keeping this theoretical grounding (and its flaws and biases) in mind, we continue to probe the problem of religion in modernity through more-recent writings. Topics include the secularization debate (Are modernity and religion antithetical?); “religious markets” and rational-choice theories of religion; religious revivalism, evangelicalism, fundamentalism, and proselytizing movements; feminist and queer sociologies of religion; civil religion (Is standing for the national anthem a religious act?); embodiment and prayer; Orientalism and postcolonial interrogations of the secular; religious violence and nationalism; the intersectionality of religion with race, class, and caste; and religion and neoliberalism. Although dominant sociologies of religion have focused on Christianity in Western Europe and North America, this course applies a global lens, training significant focus on non-Western and non-Christian contexts.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Calder, Ryan
  • Room:    
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 1/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-PT, INST-GLOBAL, ISLM-ISLMST

Labor in the World System
AS.230.465 (01)

This is an intensive reading seminar on working class formation from a comparative, historical and global perspective, including theoretical and empirical (case study) readings on changes over time in labor process, labor markets, and labor movements. We will build on a range of local case studies to establish spatial and temporal patterns, and discuss the connections between these global patterns and the dynamics of historical capitalism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Silver, Beverly Judith (BEVERLY)
  • Room: Mergenthaler 526  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Arts and Social Justice Practicum
AS.362.402 (01)

This course provides students with an opportunity to explore art and social justice and its history in Baltimore and the Black Arts Movement through the creation of student-led artistic projects. Students will examine their creative practices and how they can be used to advocate for change. Local artist and scholars will share their expertise providing lived experiences of using art as a call to action. At the end of the semester, students will present their projects in a public showcase of student work through film, poetry, photography, painting and other visual media. (No prior artistic training necessary.)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 11:00AM - 1:00PM, F 1:01PM - 2:00PM
  • Instructor: Amen Strayhorn, Kali-ahset (Kali-Ahset), Stocks, Shawntay
  • Room:    
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 6/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Geography of Opportunity
AS.230.339 (01)

The schools that children attend and the neighborhoods in which they live are critically important sites of mental and physical development, socialization, and academic achievement. These contexts in which children live and learn are also highly segregated by race and class, resulting in spatially stratified opportunities for social mobility – what social scientists call “the geography of opportunity.” This course explores social inequality through the lens of space, place, and geography, with a particular focus on how these dynamics shape educational inequality in the United States. Drawing on readings from sociology, demography, psychology, history, economics, urban planning, and public health, this course will teach students to think critically about how individual choices and public policies interact with dynamics of space and place to create and maintain social inequality.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Nerenberg, Kiara Millay
  • Room:    
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 3/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The City After Civil Rights
AS.230.354 (01)

This course examines how American cities have evolved since the United States ratified the radically new vision of race promoted by the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s. We will study the changing geography of race and class in American cities and their surrounding suburbs and what that evolution has meant for inequality. We will also consider how this shifting geography of race and class affects current debates in metropolitan policies like gentrification and tax policy. We will look to the future to examine what issues might come about in the coming decades and how we might avoid similar problems to those in history.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:    
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 13/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Quantitative Research Practicum
AS.230.322 (01)

This course provides “hands on” research experience applying sociological research tools and a sociological perspective to problems of substance. Quantitative methods will be emphasized, including how to access publicly available survey data, data management, and the presentation of results. Each student will design and carry out a research project and write a research report. Juniors and seniors only. Sophomores require instructor's permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Burdick-Will, Julia
  • Room:    
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Undergraduate Research Seminar
AS.230.379 (01)

Seminar for Sociology students writing senior honor theses and conducting pre-approved independent research projects. Juniors and Seniors Sociology majors only. Permission of instructor.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Andreas, Joel
  • Room:    
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 9/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Research Methods for the Social Sciences
AS.230.202 (02)

The purpose of this course is to provide a sound introduction to the overall process of research and the specific research methods most frequently used by sociologists and other social scientists. Required for Sociology majors and IS GSCD track students.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Greif, Meredith (Meredith)
  • Room:    
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/8
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Research Methods for the Social Sciences
AS.230.202 (01)

The purpose of this course is to provide a sound introduction to the overall process of research and the specific research methods most frequently used by sociologists and other social scientists. Required for Sociology majors and IS GSCD track students.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Greif, Meredith (Meredith)
  • Room:    
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.001.127 (01)FYS: Public Opinion and DemocracyMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMMorgan, Stephen L (Steve) 
 
INST-AP
AS.230.101 (01)Introduction to SociologyMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMPerrin, Andrew JMudd 26
 
AS.230.101 (02)Introduction to SociologyMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMPerrin, Andrew JMudd 26
 
AS.230.101 (05)Introduction to SociologyMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMPerrin, Andrew JMudd 26
 
AS.230.101 (06)Introduction to SociologyMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMPerrin, Andrew JMudd 26
 
AS.230.101 (07)Introduction to SociologyMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMPerrin, Andrew JMudd 26
 
AS.230.101 (08)Introduction to SociologyMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMPerrin, Andrew JMudd 26
 
AS.230.101 (09)Introduction to SociologyMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMPerrin, Andrew JMudd 26
 
AS.230.101 (10)Introduction to SociologyMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMPerrin, Andrew JMudd 26
 
AS.230.101 (11)Introduction to SociologyMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMPerrin, Andrew JMudd 26
 
AS.230.101 (12)Introduction to SociologyMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMPerrin, Andrew JMudd 26
 
AS.230.150 (01)Issues in International DevelopmentMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMThornton, ChristyVirtual Online
 
INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON
AS.230.150 (02)Issues in International DevelopmentMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMThornton, ChristyVirtual Online
 
INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON
AS.230.150 (03)Issues in International DevelopmentMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMThornton, ChristyVirtual Online
 
INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON
AS.230.150 (04)Issues in International DevelopmentMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMThornton, ChristyVirtual Online
 
INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON
AS.230.175 (01)Chinese RevolutionsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKuo, Huei-Ying (Huei-Ying) 
 
INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.230.233 (01)Inequality and Social Change in Contemporary ChinaTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMLiang, Guowei 
 
INST-CP, INST-ECON
AS.230.244 (01)Race and Ethnicity in American SocietyMW 4:30PM - 5:45PMGreif, Meredith (Meredith) 
 
INST-AP
AS.230.250 (01)Knowledge, Evidence, and DemocracyM 1:30PM - 4:00PMPerrin, Andrew J 
 
INST-AP, INST-CP, INST-IR
AS.230.318 (01)The Political Economy of Modern IndiaT 1:30PM - 4:00PMAgarwala, Rina (Rina) 
 
INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-ECON
AS.230.335 (01)Medical HumanitarianismTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMNaveh Benjamin, Ilil 
 
INST-IR, MSCH-HUM
AS.230.337 (01)Global Crises: Past and PresentTh 3:00PM - 5:30PMSilver, Beverly Judith (BEVERLY) 
 
INST-GLOBAL, INST-ECON, INST-IR
AS.230.341 (01)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PMAgree, EmilyVirtual Online
 
PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL
AS.230.341 (02)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PMAgree, EmilyVirtual Online
 
PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL
AS.230.341 (03)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PMAgree, EmilyVirtual Online
 
PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL
AS.230.341 (04)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PMAgree, EmilyVirtual Online
 
PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL
AS.230.349 (01)Class, Race, and Political Struggle in Capitalist SocietiesM 4:30PM - 7:00PMAwatramani, Rishi 
 
INST-ECON
AS.230.352 (01)Chinese Diaspora: Networks and IdentityTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMKuo, Huei-Ying (Huei-Ying) 
 
INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP
AS.230.367 (01)Islamic FinanceM 1:30PM - 4:00PMCalder, Ryan 
 
INST-ECON, ISLM-ISLMST
AS.230.378 (01)Refugees, Human Rights, and SovereigntyTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMNaveh Benjamin, Ilil 
 
INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.230.389 (01)The Value of Life: Racism, Capitalism and HealthW 3:00PM - 5:30PMWhite, Alexandre Ilani Rein 
 
INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.230.415 (01)Social Problems in Contemporary ChinaTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMAndreas, Joel 
 
INST-CP
AS.230.445 (01)Sociology of ReligionTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMCalder, Ryan 
 
INST-CP, INST-PT, INST-GLOBAL, ISLM-ISLMST
AS.230.465 (01)Labor in the World SystemW 3:00PM - 5:30PMSilver, Beverly Judith (BEVERLY)Mergenthaler 526
 
INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.362.402 (01)Arts and Social Justice PracticumF 11:00AM - 1:00PM, F 1:01PM - 2:00PMAmen Strayhorn, Kali-ahset (Kali-Ahset), Stocks, Shawntay 
 
AS.230.339 (01)The Geography of OpportunityTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMNerenberg, Kiara Millay 
 
AS.230.354 (01)The City After Civil RightsM 1:30PM - 4:00PMStaff 
 
AS.230.322 (01)Quantitative Research PracticumTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMBurdick-Will, Julia 
 
AS.230.379 (01)Undergraduate Research SeminarM 1:30PM - 4:00PMAndreas, Joel 
 
AS.230.202 (02)Research Methods for the Social SciencesMW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMGreif, Meredith (Meredith) 
 
AS.230.202 (01)Research Methods for the Social SciencesMW 3:00PM - 3:50PM, F 3:00PM - 3:50PMGreif, Meredith (Meredith)