Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (04)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Calder, Ryan
  • Room: Maryland 110
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (03)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Calder, Ryan
  • Room: Maryland 110
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (02)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Calder, Ryan
  • Room: Maryland 110
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (05)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Calder, Ryan
  • Room: Maryland 110
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (06)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Calder, Ryan
  • Room: Maryland 110
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/12
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (07)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Calder, Ryan
  • Room: Maryland 110
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (08)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Calder, Ryan
  • Room: Maryland 110
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/12
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (09)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Calder, Ryan
  • Room: Maryland 110
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Race and the Politics of Punishment in the US
AS.190.433 (01)

Contact with criminal justice has become a primary way that many Americans see and experience government, particularly those from race-class subjugated communities. Yet, our field has been slow to appreciate the development of the carceral state or to consider its manifold for citizenship. In this advanced undergraduate seminar, we will survey key debates around punishment, state violence, and surveillance, with a particular focus on research that takes institutional development, history and racial orders seriously. Why did the carceral state expand in "fits and starts" and with what consequence for state-building? We explore its (racialized and gendered) relationship to other key systems: foster care, social provision, labor relations and the labor market, and immigration enforcement. A core preoccupation of this course will be to understand the ways in which the criminal justice system "makes race" and how debates about crime and punishment were often debates about black inclusion and equality. How does exposure to criminal justice interventions shape political learning, democratic habits, and racial lifeworlds? In addition to policy, political discourse, and racial politics, we will employ works from a range of fields - history, sociology, law and criminology - and a range of methods (ethnography, historical analysis, quantitative and qualitative). Required books include: Khalil Muhammad's Condemnation of Blackness: race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America, Elizabeth Hinton's From the War on Poverty to the War on Crime, David Oshinsky's Worse than Slavery: Parchman Farm and the Ordeal of Jim Crow Justice, Bruce Western's Punishment and Inequality in America, and Michael Fortner's Black Silent Majority: The Rockefeller Drug Laws and the Politics of Punishment.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Weaver, Vesla
  • Room: Bloomberg 276
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, SPOL-UL

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (01)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Calder, Ryan
  • Room: Maryland 110
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Issues in International Development
AS.230.150 (01)

This course will provide an undergraduate level introduction to the study and practice, as well as the successes and failures, of international development. Students will be introduced to the various theoretical frameworks used to explain underdevelopment. Students will also explore the practice of development since the 1950s by examining specific strategies employed in Latin America, South Asia, East Asia, and Africa. Using a variety of country-specific case studies, students will have the opportunity to apply the theoretical and practical frameworks learned in the class to assess the successes and failures of real-life cases.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Agarwala, Rina
  • Room: Ames 218
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/25
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Freshman Seminar: Gender, Health and Aging
AS.230.154 (01)

In this course students will develop an understanding of the ways in which gender structures health and well being through adulthood and later life. The experience of sexual minorities and the ntersection of gender with class and ethnicity will also be discussed. Students will be expected to participate actively and lead discussions on specific topics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Agree, Emily
  • Room: Gilman 217
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Education & Inequality: Individual, Contextual, and Policy Perspectives
AS.230.320 (01)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Deluca, Stefanie
  • Room: Hodson 311
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/25
  • PosTag(s): SPOL-UL

Exploring Baltimore: An Introduction to Urban Studies
AS.230.195 (01)

This course will introduce students to the field of urban studies and Baltimore itself. Students will learn data collection and analysis methods used in the social sciences. Students will discuss relevant research published in urban studies by Johns Hopkins faculty and other experts in the field. Students will also gain an introduction to their adopted home, Baltimore, by collecting data and conducting field observations in different neighborhoods.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Reese, Michael Joseph, Jr.
  • Room: BLC 4040
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/16
  • PosTag(s): SPOL-UL

Chinese Revolutions
AS.230.175 (01)

This course introduces the origins, operation and impacts of five major revolutions in modern China between 1850 and 1950. These include the Taiping Rebellion, the republican revolutions, federalist and southern automatic movements, labor strikes as well as peasant rebellions. It draws on the existing historiography that examines China’s transition from an empire to a republic, impacts of western and Japanese influences to China, as well as the continuity and change of Chinese social organizations. Cross list with International Studies and East Asian Studies. Fulfills IS History requirement.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Kuo, Huei-Ying
  • Room: Shriver Hall 104
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-NWHIST, INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL

Research Tools for Global Sociology and Development
AS.230.265 (01)

This course will introduce students to a range of software programs that are critical for conducting social scientific research in the 21st century. Students will develop competency in the use of computer programs for statistical analysis, database management, the creation of maps and timelines, and the presentation of research reports. The course uses examples from ongoing social science faculty research projects at Johns Hopkins on global inequality and international development. Required for GSCD track students. Course previously titled "Research Tools and Technologies for the Social Sciences"

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Kang, Minhyoung
  • Room: Krieger 108
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Land, Labor and Environmental Movements in Contemporary Africa
AS.230.219 (01)

The course examines the new wave of social protest and popular uprisings in contemporary Africa through the interconnected themes of land, labor, and environmental movements. Attention will be placed on the early 21st century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Jacobs, Ricado Eduard
  • Room: Maryland 104
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Medical Humanitarianism
AS.230.335 (02)

Humanitarian organizations play life-preserving roles in global conflicts, and have front-row views of disasters ranging from the 2010 Haiti earthquake to the 2011 Fukushima tsunami in Japan. Yet even while they provide vital assistance to millions of people in crisis, such organizations are beset by important paradoxes that hinder their capacity to create sustainable interventions. They work to fill long-lasting needs, but are prone to moving quickly from one site to the next in search of the latest emergency. They strive to be apolitical, yet are invariably influenced by the geopolitical agendas of global powers. How do such contradictions arise, and what is their impact upon millions of aid recipients around the world? Drawing on case studies from South Sudan to Haiti, this course addresses these contradictions by exploring how and why medical aid organizations attempt, and sometimes fail, to reconcile short-term goals, such as immediate life-saving, with long-term missions, such as public health programs and conflict resolution initiatives.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Naveh Benjamin, Ilil
  • Room: Krieger 300
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Schooling, Racial Inequality and Public Policy in America
AS.230.385 (01)

After examining alternative explanations for why individuals obtain different amounts and types of educational training, the course focuses on how an individual’s family background and race affect his or her trajectory through the educational system. The course covers the specific challenges that have confronted urban schooling in America since the 1960s, including the classic literature on the effects of school and community resources on student achievement as well as the development and later evaluation of school desegregation policies. The course also considers case studies of current policy debates in the US, such as housing segregation and school resegregation, voucher programs for school choice, and the motivation for and consequences of the establishment of state-mandated testing requirements. Throughout the course, emphasis is placed upon the alternative modes of inquiry and writing which opposing scholars, policymakers, and journalists use to address these contentious topics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Morgan, Stephen L
  • Room: Hodson 301
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, SPOL-UL

Sociology of Health and Illness
AS.230.341 (03)

This course introduces students to medical sociology, which is the application of the sociological perspective to health and health care. Major topics include stress, social epidemiology, and the social organization of health care.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PM
  • Instructor: Agree, Emily
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL

Sociology in Economic Life
AS.230.369 (01)

This course discusses how geopolitics, technology as well as social differentiation (such as race, class and gender) shape the structure of economic actions. Special attention will be paid to patterns of state-business relationship, labor processes, migrant economy, globalization and international division of labor.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Kuo, Huei-Ying
  • Room: Smokler Center 301
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, INST-PT

Housing and Homelessness in the United States
AS.230.370 (01)

This course will examine the role of housing, or the absence thereof, in shaping quality of life. It will explore the consequences of the places in which we live and how we are housed. Consideration will be given to overcrowding, affordability, accessibility, and past and existing housing policies and their influence on society. Special attention will be given to the problem of homelessness.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Greif, Meredith
  • Room: Hodson 301
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, SPOL-UL

Sociology of Health and Illness
AS.230.341 (01)

This course introduces students to medical sociology, which is the application of the sociological perspective to health and health care. Major topics include stress, social epidemiology, and the social organization of health care.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Agree, Emily
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL

Sociology of Health and Illness
AS.230.341 (04)

This course introduces students to medical sociology, which is the application of the sociological perspective to health and health care. Major topics include stress, social epidemiology, and the social organization of health care.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PM
  • Instructor: Agree, Emily
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL

Sociology of Health and Illness
AS.230.341 (02)

This course introduces students to medical sociology, which is the application of the sociological perspective to health and health care. Major topics include stress, social epidemiology, and the social organization of health care.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Agree, Emily
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL

Global Health and Human Rights
AS.230.393 (01)

Is access to healthcare a fundamental human right? If so, then which global actors are obligated to provide healthcare to whom, and for how long? How do meanings of health and illness vary across time and place? And finally, how are human rights principles translated into frontline practice in order to promote well-being? This course takes a critical interdisciplinary approach to these questions through a series of global case studies ranging from humanitarian aid in post-tsunami Sri Lanka to anti-FGM (female genital mutilation) campaigns in Ghana. How do international NGOs, UN bodies, and governments collaborate (or compete) to distribute healthcare in places beset by dire resource shortages? Do human rights principles carry legal weight across borders, and if so, could access to healthcare services and essential medicines be litigated in order to compel governments to provide it? And finally, what cultural assumptions do human rights discourses carry with them, and what happens if rights-based approaches are poorly received by recipient populations? Moving beyond the basic principle of healthcare as a human right, this course aims to bring this idea’s history and politics into focus by offering an in-depth exploration of its ethics and implementation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Naveh Benjamin, Ilil
  • Room: Gilman 75
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Social Theory
AS.230.213 (01)

This course will focus on four classical theorists whose ideas have greatly influenced the ways we study society: Karl Marx, Max Weber, Emile Durkheim, and W. E. B. Du Bois. The course is devoted to understanding how each theorist understood the origin, structure, and historical dynamics of modern societies. In addition to comparing their theories, we will use them to analyze current social issues, including those involving social inequality, conflict, cohesion, and change.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Schrader, Stuart Laurence
  • Room: Maryland 109
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, GECS-SOCSCI

Sociology of Immigration
AS.230.317 (01)

This course surveys sociological theories and research on immigration to the U.S. Theoretical approaches include theories of international migration, economic sociology, immigration, and assimilation. Research topics include the impact of U.S. immigration laws and policies on immigrant inflows and stocks, self-selection of immigrants, the impact of immigration on the native-born population and the U.S. labor market and economy, and the adaptation of the first and second generations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Hao, Lingxin
  • Room: Gilman 134
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/18
  • PosTag(s): SPOL-UL, INST-IR

The Political Economy of Drugs and Drug Wars
AS.230.397 (01)

In the United States, we spend more than $100 billion annually on illegal drugs—and the government spends more than $50 billion a year to combat their sale and use. These statistics raise important and complicated social questions. This course will examine the production, sale, use, and control of illegal drugs from a historical and sociological perspective. We will have three objectives: to understand the social construction of drug use and illegality in the United States and other rich countries; to uncover the political and economic consequences of drug trafficking in those countries that produce drugs, particularly in Latin America; and to examine the political economy of drug control through the so-called War on Drugs, both domestically and internationally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Thornton, Christy
  • Room: Hodson 211
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Introduction to Social Policy: Baltimore and Beyond
AS.360.247 (01)

This course will introduce students to basic concepts in economics, political science and sociology relevant to the study of social problems and the programs designed to remedy them. It will address the many inequalities in access to education and health care, unequal treatment in the criminal justice system, disparities in income and wealth, and differential access to political power. The focus will be on designing effective policies at the national and local level to address these pressing issues. This course is open to all students, but will be required for the new Social Policy Minor. The course is also recommended for students who are interested in law school, medical school, programs in public health, and graduate school in related social science fields. This course does not count as one of the required courses for the Economics major or minor, but it is required for the Social Policy Minor. Cross list with Sociology, Economics and Political Science. Freshman, Sophomore and Juniors only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 10:30AM - 11:45AM, T 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Deluca, Stefanie, Morgan, Barbara Anne, Schlozman, Daniel
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/25
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Race and Ethnicity in American Society
AS.230.244 (01)

Race and ethnicity have played a prominent role in American society and continue to do so, as demonstrated by interracial and interethnic gaps in economic and educational achievement, residence, political power, family structure, crime, and health. Using a sociological framework, we will explore the historical significance of race and its development as a social construction, assess the causes and consequences of intergroup inequalities and explore potential solutions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Greif, Meredith
  • Room: Hodson 313
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, SPOL-UL

Contemporary Social Theory
AS.230.395 (01)

This course will examine how major social theorists of the 20th century advanced upon the “classical” social theories of Marx, Weber, and Durkheim. As they grappled with the historical events and social concerns of the 20th century—the Russian revolution and its degeneration into Stalinism, the failure of communist movements in the West, the rise and fall of fascism and Nazism, the consolidation of capitalist democracies and welfare states, the emergence of anti-colonial movements in the “Third World,” and the persistence of race, gender and sexuality as forms of domination—social theorists provided novel answers to classical questions of social theory: 1) what is the structure of modern society, how does it change, and how is it reproduced?; 2) what is the relation between social structures and ideas, knowledge, and subjectivity?; and 3) what are the conditions of possibility for human freedom? Theorists to be covered include Antonio Gramsci, Franz Fanon, W.E.B. Dubois, Georg Lukacs, Talcott Parsons, Herbert Marcuse, Jurgen Habermas, Louis Althusser, Pierre Bourdieu, Michel Foucault, Nancy Fraser, Patricia Hill Collins, Judith Butler, and Henri Lefebvre. In addition to understanding and comparing the theories, we will try to use them to understand contemporary societies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Agarwala, Rina
  • Room: Hodson 303
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-PT

Documentary Photography in a Changing China
AS.310.210 (01)

This course aims to inspire students to explore the impacts, meanings, and explanations of social transformation in contemporary China, via the lens of documentary photography. The photographic images of selective topics will include the products of photojournalism and documentary photography, and several documentary films, by both Chinese and non-Chinese photographers. While one picture is worth thousand words, one picture may also provoke countless interpretations. Students are strongly encouraged to read broadly about different aspects of social transformations in contemporary China, and to select and curate their own subjects of photo images. The spirit of comparative study of documentary photography of China and other parts of world will be strongly encouraged. Active class participation is imperative. A small exhibition on the campus will be organized by the Spring semester. The course is designed for upper division undergraduates. Cross-listed with Sociology and International Studies (CP).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: He, Gaochao
  • Room: Bloomberg 278
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

Labor Politics in China
AS.310.402 (01)

This course explores the transformation of labor relations in China over the past century. It will cover the origins of the labor movement, the changes brought about by the 1949 Revolution, the industrial battles of the Cultural Revolution, the traumatic restructuring of state-owned enterprises over the past two decades, the rise of private enterprise and export-oriented industry, the conditions faced by migrant workers today, and recent developments in industrial relations and labor conflict. The course is designed for upper division undergraduates and graduate students. Cross-listed with Sociology and International Studies (CP).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: He, Gaochao
  • Room: Krieger 306
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-ECON

Neoliberalism
AS.230.405 (01)

Neoliberalism, a political project that seeks to subject all aspects of social life to free market force, has ascended to orthodoxy in developed and developing countries alike over the last four decades. This course is a reading seminar focused on some of the key classic and cutting-edge original texts that critically examine and debate the origins, socio-political impacts, and crisis of the neoliberal project. It will cover such topics as the genealogy of the neoliberal idea, neoliberal state, informalization of works, neoliberal cities, rise of the one percent, and global governance. Class will be a mix of lecture and seminar-style discussions. Requirements include reading memo, class presentation, and a term paper.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Hung, Ho-Fung
  • Room: Mergenthaler 526
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, INST-ECON

Medical Humanitarianism
AS.230.335 (01)

Humanitarian organizations play life-preserving roles in global conflicts, and have front-row views of disasters ranging from the 2010 Haiti earthquake to the 2011 Fukushima tsunami in Japan. Yet even while they provide vital assistance to millions of people in crisis, such organizations are beset by important paradoxes that hinder their capacity to create sustainable interventions. They work to fill long-lasting needs, but are prone to moving quickly from one site to the next in search of the latest emergency. They strive to be apolitical, yet are invariably influenced by the geopolitical agendas of global powers. How do such contradictions arise, and what is their impact upon millions of aid recipients around the world? Drawing on case studies from South Sudan to Haiti, this course addresses these contradictions by exploring how and why medical aid organizations attempt, and sometimes fail, to reconcile short-term goals, such as immediate life-saving, with long-term missions, such as public health programs and conflict resolution initiatives.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Naveh Benjamin, Ilil
  • Room: Shriver Hall 104
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Police and Prisons in Comparative Perspective
AS.362.314 (01)

This course will examine policing and prisons in the United States and beyond, with a focus on racial inequality. It will consist of two parts. First, we will explore the contemporary state of prisons and policing in the United States and look at debates around the rise of “mass incarceration” and aggressive forms of policing in the final third of the 20th century. Second, we will explore policing and prison in other parts of the globe in the contemporary moment, highlighting similarities and differences from the U.S. case. What can studying the instruments of social control in other societies reveal about our own? Students will develop an understanding of major trends, keywords, and debates in the literature on policing and prisons, with particular reference to race and racism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Schrader, Stuart Laurence
  • Room: Remsen Hall 1
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/18
  • PosTag(s): AFRS-AFAMER, INST-CP, INST-AP

Introduction to Social Policy: Baltimore and Beyond
AS.360.247 (02)

This course will introduce students to basic concepts in economics, political science and sociology relevant to the study of social problems and the programs designed to remedy them. It will address the many inequalities in access to education and health care, unequal treatment in the criminal justice system, disparities in income and wealth, and differential access to political power. The focus will be on designing effective policies at the national and local level to address these pressing issues. This course is open to all students, but will be required for the new Social Policy Minor. The course is also recommended for students who are interested in law school, medical school, programs in public health, and graduate school in related social science fields. This course does not count as one of the required courses for the Economics major or minor, but it is required for the Social Policy Minor. Cross list with Sociology, Economics and Political Science. Freshman, Sophomore and Juniors only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 10:30AM - 11:45AM, T 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Deluca, Stefanie, Morgan, Barbara Anne, Schlozman, Daniel
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/25
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Introduction to Social Policy: Baltimore and Beyond
AS.360.247 (03)

This course will introduce students to basic concepts in economics, political science and sociology relevant to the study of social problems and the programs designed to remedy them. It will address the many inequalities in access to education and health care, unequal treatment in the criminal justice system, disparities in income and wealth, and differential access to political power. The focus will be on designing effective policies at the national and local level to address these pressing issues. This course is open to all students, but will be required for the new Social Policy Minor. The course is also recommended for students who are interested in law school, medical school, programs in public health, and graduate school in related social science fields. This course does not count as one of the required courses for the Economics major or minor, but it is required for the Social Policy Minor. Cross list with Sociology, Economics and Political Science. Freshman, Sophomore and Juniors only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 10:30AM - 11:45AM, T 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Deluca, Stefanie, Morgan, Barbara Anne, Schlozman, Daniel
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/25
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.230.101 (04)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMCalder, RyanMaryland 110GECS-SOCSCI
AS.230.101 (03)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMCalder, RyanMaryland 110GECS-SOCSCI
AS.230.101 (02)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMCalder, RyanMaryland 110GECS-SOCSCI
AS.230.101 (05)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMCalder, RyanMaryland 110GECS-SOCSCI
AS.230.101 (06)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMCalder, RyanMaryland 110GECS-SOCSCI
AS.230.101 (07)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMCalder, RyanMaryland 110GECS-SOCSCI
AS.230.101 (08)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMCalder, RyanMaryland 110GECS-SOCSCI
AS.230.101 (09)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMCalder, RyanMaryland 110GECS-SOCSCI
AS.190.433 (01)Race and the Politics of Punishment in the USTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMWeaver, VeslaBloomberg 276INST-AP, SPOL-UL
AS.230.101 (01)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMCalder, RyanMaryland 110GECS-SOCSCI
AS.230.150 (01)Issues in International DevelopmentM 1:30PM - 4:00PMAgarwala, RinaAmes 218GECS-SOCSCI
AS.230.154 (01)Freshman Seminar: Gender, Health and AgingTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMAgree, EmilyGilman 217
AS.230.320 (01)Education & Inequality: Individual, Contextual, and Policy PerspectivesT 4:00PM - 6:30PMDeluca, StefanieHodson 311SPOL-UL
AS.230.195 (01)Exploring Baltimore: An Introduction to Urban StudiesTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMReese, Michael Joseph, Jr.BLC 4040SPOL-UL
AS.230.175 (01)Chinese RevolutionsTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMKuo, Huei-YingShriver Hall 104INST-NWHIST, INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL
AS.230.265 (01)Research Tools for Global Sociology and DevelopmentTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMKang, MinhyoungKrieger 108
AS.230.219 (01)Land, Labor and Environmental Movements in Contemporary AfricaTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMJacobs, Ricado EduardMaryland 104INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.230.335 (02)Medical HumanitarianismMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMNaveh Benjamin, IlilKrieger 300INST-IR
AS.230.385 (01)Schooling, Racial Inequality and Public Policy in AmericaMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMMorgan, Stephen LHodson 301INST-AP, SPOL-UL
AS.230.341 (03)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PMAgree, EmilyMergenthaler 111PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL
AS.230.369 (01)Sociology in Economic LifeTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKuo, Huei-YingSmokler Center 301INST-ECON, INST-PT
AS.230.370 (01)Housing and Homelessness in the United StatesTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMGreif, MeredithHodson 301INST-AP, SPOL-UL
AS.230.341 (01)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PMAgree, EmilyMergenthaler 111PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL
AS.230.341 (04)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PMAgree, EmilyMergenthaler 111PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL
AS.230.341 (02)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PMAgree, EmilyMergenthaler 111PHIL-BIOETH, SPOL-UL
AS.230.393 (01)Global Health and Human RightsTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMNaveh Benjamin, IlilGilman 75INST-IR
AS.230.213 (01)Social TheoryMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMSchrader, Stuart LaurenceMaryland 109INST-PT, GECS-SOCSCI
AS.230.317 (01)Sociology of ImmigrationMW 4:30PM - 5:45PMHao, LingxinGilman 134SPOL-UL, INST-IR
AS.230.397 (01)The Political Economy of Drugs and Drug WarsMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMThornton, ChristyHodson 211INST-ECON, INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.360.247 (01)Introduction to Social Policy: Baltimore and BeyondTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM, T 10:30AM - 11:45AMDeluca, Stefanie, Morgan, Barbara Anne, Schlozman, DanielMergenthaler 111GECS-SOCSCI
AS.230.244 (01)Race and Ethnicity in American SocietyTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMGreif, MeredithHodson 313INST-AP, SPOL-UL
AS.230.395 (01)Contemporary Social TheoryF 3:00PM - 5:30PMAgarwala, RinaHodson 303INST-CP, INST-PT
AS.310.210 (01)Documentary Photography in a Changing ChinaW 1:30PM - 4:00PMHe, GaochaoBloomberg 278INST-CP
AS.310.402 (01)Labor Politics in ChinaTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMHe, GaochaoKrieger 306INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-ECON
AS.230.405 (01)NeoliberalismT 1:30PM - 4:00PMHung, Ho-FungMergenthaler 526INST-AP, INST-ECON
AS.230.335 (01)Medical HumanitarianismMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMNaveh Benjamin, IlilShriver Hall 104INST-IR
AS.362.314 (01)Police and Prisons in Comparative PerspectiveMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMSchrader, Stuart LaurenceRemsen Hall 1AFRS-AFAMER, INST-CP, INST-AP
AS.360.247 (02)Introduction to Social Policy: Baltimore and BeyondTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM, T 10:30AM - 11:45AMDeluca, Stefanie, Morgan, Barbara Anne, Schlozman, DanielMergenthaler 111GECS-SOCSCI
AS.360.247 (03)Introduction to Social Policy: Baltimore and BeyondTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM, T 10:30AM - 11:45AMDeluca, Stefanie, Morgan, Barbara Anne, Schlozman, DanielMergenthaler 111GECS-SOCSCI

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (04)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Calder, Ryan
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (02)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Calder, Ryan
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Racial Inequality, Policy and Politics in the US
AS.190.300 (01)

While policies were passed to ensure equal opportunity for racially subjugated Americans, the United States witnessed increasing stratification of wealth and income and deepening concentration of poverty, stagnation in closing racial gaps, and new forms of inequality posed by the striking upsurge in contact with the criminal justice system at the bottom of the skills ladder and concentration of wealth at the top. At the same time, the welfare state came under attack and faced challenges posed by an aging population, women entering the labor force, deindustrialization, and international pressures of globalization. Social spending withered in some areas while spending on citizens was increasingly likely to happen through tax expenditures and private means. This course investigates the politics around these developments and competing perspectives in debates over redistributive policies in the United States and their impact on inequality, particularly race and gender inequality. We will examine the contours of inequality and explanations for why it has expanded over the past several decades. We explore why the US is exceptional in both the level of inequality it tolerates and the generosity and types of remedies to alleviate poverty in comparison to its European counterparts and debate the role of race, unions, electoral politics and institutions. We investigate several specific cases of persistent racial inequality – concentrated poverty, segregation, and incarceration. We investigate both how policies have reinforced racial and gender divisions from a top-down perspective as well as examining under what conditions the disadvantaged contest inequality, exploring how political struggle shapes policy from the bottom-up. The last part of the course examines the consequences of inequality and social policy for representation and citizenship and how economic inequality affects political representation and responsiveness of elites to masses.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Weaver, Vesla
  • Room: Hodson 311
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/30
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Critical Race Theory, Law, and Criminal Justice
AS.191.303 (01)

In this course, students will gain a foundational understanding of critical race theory, including its genesis in legal theory. The course will examine its relationship and importance to social movements, including through key concepts like intersectionality. The course will also use critical race theory to grapple with law, racial segregation, and the criminal justice system in the United States.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Schrader, Stuart Laurence
  • Room: Krieger Laverty
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): POLI-AP, POLI-PT, INST-AP, INST-PT, SPOL-UL

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (03)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Calder, Ryan
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (05)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Calder, Ryan
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (06)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Calder, Ryan
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (07)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Calder, Ryan
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (01)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Calder, Ryan
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sociology
AS.230.101 (08)

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Calder, Ryan
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Issues in International Development
AS.230.150 (01)

Why do billions of people continue to live in poverty? What obstacles stand in the way of secure and dignified lives for all? Who is most likely to bring about change, what strategies should they follow, and what kinds of institutions should they put in place? This course will introduce the main theoretical perspectives, debates, and themes in the field of international development since the mid-20th century. It has three sections. The first section focuses on debates over the optimal conditions and strategies for generating economic growth and on the relationship between growth, human welfare, and inequality. The second section presents critical assessments of development interventions from various perspectives. The third section considers the role of social movements in shaping development and social change in the 21st century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Agarwala, Rina
  • Room: Hodson 303
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Research Methods for the Social Sciences
AS.230.202 (01)

The purpose of this course is to provide a sound introduction to the overall process of research and the specific research methods most frequently used by sociologists and other social scientists. Required for Sociology majors and IS GSCD track students.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Hao, Lingxin
  • Room: Hodson 211
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Quantitative Research Practicum
AS.230.322 (01)

This course provides “hands on” research experience applying sociological research tools and a sociological perspective to problems of substance. Quantitative methods will be emphasized, as applied to census data, survey data and/or archival data. Students will design and carry out a research project and write a research report. Juniors and seniors only. Sophomores require instructor's permission. Recommended Course Background: AS.230.205, AS.230.202

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Burdick-Will, Julia
  • Room: Ames 218
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Medical Humanitarianism
AS.230.335 (01)

Humanitarian organizations play life-preserving roles in global conflicts, and have front-row views of disasters ranging from the 2010 Haiti earthquake to the 2011 Fukushima tsunami in Japan. Yet even while they provide vital assistance to millions of people in crisis, such organizations are beset by important paradoxes that hinder their capacity to create sustainable interventions. They work to fill long-lasting needs, but are prone to moving quickly from one site to the next in search of the latest emergency. They strive to be apolitical, yet are invariably influenced by the geopolitical agendas of global powers. How do such contradictions arise, and what is their impact upon millions of aid recipients around the world? Drawing on case studies from South Sudan to Haiti, this course addresses these contradictions by exploring how and why medical aid organizations attempt, and sometimes fail, to reconcile short-term goals, such as immediate life-saving, with long-term missions, such as public health programs and conflict resolution initiatives.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Naveh Benjamin, Ilil
  • Room: Gilman 377
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, MSCH-HUM

Plagues, Power, and Social Control
AS.230.306 (01)

While developments in biomedicine and health care have led to the eradication, cure and management of many human health problems, disease, illness and health have also been the focus for aggressive social controls and population management. The technologies and practices of disease control and health management have been foundational to some of the most aggressive structures of oppression in recent history such as the Jewish Ghetto, the Concentration Camp, the South African Township and techniques of segregation. This course seeks to explore how epidemics and disease control are linked to larger questions of power, state craft and international dynamics. This course asks how have outbreaks of infectious disease shaped social and political action? How do societies respond to outbreaks and why? What do epidemic moments tell us about global structures of power and the dynamics of control? Drawing on historical cases including plague during the European Renaissance and before, the HIV/AIDS Pandemic and the West African Ebola Outbreak of 2013-2016, this course will introduce students to the history and practices of disease control as well as important theoretical perspectives by which to understand the sociological and historical effects of disease and the responses to them. Students will engage sociological concepts such as biopolitics, social construction of disease and illness and biosecurity and produce a final research paper examining the outcomes and responses to an epidemic event to show mastery of the topics covered in the course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: White, Alexandre Ilani Rein
  • Room: Shaffer 304
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Beyond the Wall: The Political Economy of the US and Mexico
AS.230.238 (01)

Examining the exchange of culture, people, and commodities between the United States and Mexico since the 19th century, this course asks not just how US practices and policies have shaped Mexican society, but how, in turn, Mexico has shaped the United States. We will examine the social, political, and economic forces that have long pulled these two societies together – and pushed them apart.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Thornton, Christy
  • Room: Gilman 134
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP, INST-ECON

Qualitative Research Practicum
AS.230.323 (01)

This course provides "hands on" research experience applying sociological research tools and a sociological perspective to problems of substance. Qualitative observational and/or interviewing methods will be emphasized. Students will design and carry out a research project and write a research report. This course fulfills the "research practicum" requirement for the Sociology major.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Amen Strayhorn, Kali-ahset
  • Room: Mattin Center 162
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): CSC-CE

Sociology of Health and Illness
AS.230.341 (04)

This course introduces students to core concepts that define the sociological approach to health, illness and health care. Topics include: health disparities, social context of health and illness, and the Sociology of Medicine.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PM
  • Instructor: Agree, Emily
  • Room: Ames 234
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL

Sociology of Health and Illness
AS.230.341 (03)

This course introduces students to core concepts that define the sociological approach to health, illness and health care. Topics include: health disparities, social context of health and illness, and the Sociology of Medicine.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PM
  • Instructor: Agree, Emily
  • Room: Ames 234
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL

Islamic Finance
AS.230.367 (01)

Today, Islamic finance is a global industry comprising nearly $2 trillion in assets, with hubs from Kuala Lumpur to Dubai to London. But half a century ago, nothing called “Islamic finance” existed. So where did Islamic finance come from? Why is it growing so fast? And what does it mean for finance to be Islamic? We discuss the ban on riba in the Quran and hadith, finance in early and medieval Islamic societies, petrodollars and the birth of Islamic banking in the 1970s, the rise of Islamic capital markets since 2000, contemporary shariah-compliant financial structures, and the constitution of piety through financial practice.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Calder, Ryan
  • Room: Gilman 400
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, ISLM-ISLMST

Global Crises: Past and Present
AS.230.337 (01)

This course will compare the current global crisis with previous major crises of historical capitalism through a combination of theoretical and historical readings. Throughout, we will ask: What can a study of past crises tell us about the nature and future trajectory of the current global crisis? Special emphasis will be placed on (1) “the late-nineteenth century great depression”, (2) the Great Depression of the 1930s, and (3) the period of crisis and stagflation in the 1970s. We will be particularly concerned to understand the differential social and geopolitical impact of the crises. Which social classes bore the brunt of the disruptions in economic activity in each crisis? Which geographical areas or geopolitical groupings lost out (or benefited) from the crisis? How have environmental and ecological challenges resurfaced in each crisis including today?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Silver, Beverly Judith
  • Room: Shaffer 300
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-ECON

Research Methods for the Social Sciences
AS.230.202 (02)

The purpose of this course is to provide a sound introduction to the overall process of research and the specific research methods most frequently used by sociologists and other social scientists. Required for Sociology majors and IS GSCD track students.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Hao, Lingxin
  • Room: Hodson 211
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Chinese Diaspora: Networks and Identity
AS.230.352 (01)

This course combines lecture and class discussion. It examines the history and historiography of Chinese overseas migration. Major issues include overseas Chinese as “merchants without empire,” Chinese exclusion acts in the age of mass migration, the “Chinese question” in postcolonial Southeast Asia, as well as the making and unmaking of Chinese identity in the current wave of globalization.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Kuo, Huei-Ying
  • Room: Bloomberg 178
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP

Baltimore and Beyond
AS.230.357 (01)

This course uses the city of Baltimore as a lens through which to explore issues of urban inequality. We will focus on Baltimore's history of racial segregation and concentrated poverty, and its effect on the social and economic well-being of the city and its residents, with attention to education, employment, health and crime. Students will learn how to employ Census data, GIS approaches, and sociological research to inform questions about population change, inequality and the distribution of resources across the city and metropolitan region. Students will also work on one or more policy relevant studies based in Baltimore, including: a project on abandoned and vacant housing, a desegregation intervention, and a longitudinal study of inner city youth. Finally, students will become familiar with Baltimore City's programs and policy approaches to addressing the city's most pressing problems, and will design innovative and effective and innovative solutions as part of their course assignments. Enrollment restricted to Social Policy minors only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Deluca, Stefanie
  • Room: Abel Wolman House 100
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): SPOL-UL

Sociology of Health and Illness
AS.230.341 (02)

This course introduces students to core concepts that define the sociological approach to health, illness and health care. Topics include: health disparities, social context of health and illness, and the Sociology of Medicine.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Agree, Emily
  • Room: Ames 234
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL

Disability and Society
AS.230.216 (01)

Objectives of this course are to achieve an understanding of the social context of disability from the population level to the individual disability experience. Topics will include social versus medical models of disability; the spectrum of ability; the history of disability; civil rights perspectives; life course and aging aspects of disability; and the role of the environment. Attention will be paid both to theoretical understandings of disability and the role of policies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Agree, Emily
  • Room: Krieger 302
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Sociology of Health and Illness
AS.230.341 (01)

This course introduces students to core concepts that define the sociological approach to health, illness and health care. Topics include: health disparities, social context of health and illness, and the Sociology of Medicine.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Agree, Emily
  • Room: Ames 234
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL

Refugees, Human Rights, and Sovereignty
AS.230.378 (01)

What is a refugee? Since World War II, states that have pledged to offer protection to refugees have frequently been drawn instead to the dictates of nationalism and communitarianism, which prioritize concern for their own citizens, rather than to the needs of forced migrants. As a result, even those migrants that have been formally recognized as refugees according to the 1951 UN Refugee Convention have not been assured of protection, and other migrants have been even less assured. In this course, we will locate the reasons for this reality in the legal, political, and historical underpinnings of political asylum. What is the difference between an asylum seeker and a refugee? How has the refugee category been redefined and contested by international bodies since 1951? How are the ambiguities of real-life violence and persecution simplified in asylum adjudication interviews that require clear, factual narratives? What kinds of protections are offered to asylum seekers, whether by UN bodies, NGOs, or host governments, and how have such protections varied geographically and historically? Finally, what protections, if any, are afforded to those migrants who are fleeing not persecution but rather “merely” endemic poverty or climate-induced displacement? The course draws on literature from sociology, history, anthropology, and international refugee law in order to understand the capacity (or lack thereof) of human rights discourses and declarations to contravene state sovereignty in the name of protecting the rightless.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Naveh Benjamin, Ilil
  • Room: Krieger 300
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Race and Ethnicity in American Society
AS.230.244 (01)

Race and ethnicity have played a prominent role in American society and continue to do so, as demonstrated by interracial and interethnic gaps in economic and educational achievement, residence, political power, family structure, crime, and health. Using a sociological framework, we will explore the historical significance of race and its development as a social construction, assess the causes and consequences of intergroup inequalities and explore potential solutions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Greif, Meredith
  • Room: Gilman 413
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Sociology of the Family
AS.230.388 (01)

Sociological perspectives on contemporary family life, including marriage and divorce, cohabitation, single parenthood, same sex partnerships, children’s wellbeing, balancing work and family responsibilities, domestic violence, and government policy toward families.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Cherlin, Andrew J
  • Room: Mattin Center 162
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Chinese Politics and Society
AS.310.230 (01)

This introductory course will familiarize students with the major dynamics of political and social change in contemporary China since 1949. The course will be divided chronologically into four main topics: 1. The contested processes of nation-state making in modern China before 1949; 2. The making of the socialist system during the Mao Years and its dismantling since 1978; 3. The Reform Era transformation to a market economy with Chinese characteristics; 4. The dynamic relationships among the state, market and society since the new millennium. Students will explore how scholars have explained major political and social changes with reference to individual and collective rationalities, specific organizational and institutional arrangements, and specific strategic and cultural mechanisms of Chinese political and social habits.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: He, Gaochao
  • Room: Gilman 313
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Port Cities and Historical Capitalism in Maritime Asia
AS.230.440 (01)

The goal of the seminar is to examine the prospects and limits of understanding the incorporation of Asia in the capitalist world-system from the prism of oceanic connections. The theoretical thrust of this course is to develop but also to adapt Janet Abu-Lughod emphasis on the connections across port cities and littoral in the Afro-Eurasian continents before the long sixteenth century in her Before European Hegemony. But instead of looking at a port city as its adjacent hinterland polity’s gateway to global trade in the premodern era, the course examines the multifarious coast-hinterland relationships. The readings are organized by a chronological order, which begins with the historical maritime silk road between the third and thirteenth centuries, and will be followed by Asian port cities in the European age of empire and postwar American-led Cold War Structure, as well as the present-day Chinese New Silk Road Diplomacy. Students are expected to select an issue of regional tensions and to analyze its historical root.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Kuo, Huei-Ying
  • Room: Shriver Hall 104
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Development and Social Change in Rural China
AS.310.340 (01)

This course will survey the major issues of development and social change in rural China since 1950s. These issues will be addressed in chronological order. They include land ownership and land grabbing, organization of rural economic, political, and social life, rural elections and village governance, development strategies, urban-rural relationship in resource allocation, rural modernization strategies in regard to irrigation, clean drinking water, electricity supply, hard paved road, education and rural medical service, women’s rights and family life, rural consumption, and etc. This course will prepare students, both empirically and analytically, to understand what happened in rural China from 1949 to the present, and how we can engage in policy and theoretical discussions based on what we learn.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: He, Gaochao
  • Room: Krieger 180
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP

The Political Economy of Drugs and Drug Wars
AS.230.397 (01)

In the United States, we spend more than $100 billion annually on illegal drugs—and the government spends more than $50 billion a year to combat their sale and use. These statistics raise important and complicated social questions. This course will examine the production, sale, use, and control of illegal drugs from a historical and sociological perspective. We will have three objectives: to understand the social construction of drug use and illegality in the United States and other rich countries; to uncover the political and economic consequences of drug trafficking in those countries that produce drugs, particularly in Latin America; and to examine the political economy of drug control through the so-called War on Drugs, both domestically and internationally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:20PM
  • Instructor: Thornton, Christy
  • Room: Gilman 134
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/16
  • PosTag(s): INST-ECON, INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Global Health and Human Rights
AS.230.393 (01)

Is access to healthcare a fundamental human right? If so, then which global actors are obligated to provide healthcare to whom, and for how long? How do meanings of health and illness vary across time and place? And finally, how are human rights principles translated into frontline practice in order to promote well-being? This course takes a critical interdisciplinary approach to these questions through a series of global case studies ranging from humanitarian aid in post-tsunami Sri Lanka to anti-FGM (female genital mutilation) campaigns in Ghana. How do international NGOs, UN bodies, and governments collaborate (or compete) to distribute healthcare in places beset by dire resource shortages? Do human rights principles carry legal weight across borders, and if so, could access to healthcare services and essential medicines be litigated in order to compel governments to provide it? And finally, what cultural assumptions do human rights discourses carry with them, and what happens if rights-based approaches are poorly received by recipient populations? Moving beyond the basic principle of healthcare as a human right, this course aims to bring this idea’s history and politics into focus by offering an in-depth exploration of its ethics and implementation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Naveh Benjamin, Ilil
  • Room: Gilman 377
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Housing and Homelessness in the United States
AS.230.370 (01)

This course will examine the role of housing, or the absence thereof, in shaping quality of life. It will explore the consequences of the places in which we live and how we are housed. Consideration will be given to overcrowding, affordability, accessibility, and past and existing housing policies and their influence on society. Special attention will be given to the problem of homelessness.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Greif, Meredith
  • Room: Gilman 134
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, SPOL-UL

Black Against Empire
AS.362.315 (01)

This course will examine the confrontation of Black social movements with imperialism in the twentieth century. How, we will ask, have key Black internationalist thinkers conceptualized and defined diaspora, capitalism, imperialism, war, and the global? What have been the effects of war and repression, as well as economic growth and globalization, on Black internationalism? Readings may include texts by W.E.B. Du Bois, Angela Y. Davis, Frantz Fanon, Ashley Farmer, Claudia Jones, Robin D.G. Kelley, Claude McKay, Huey P. Newton, Walter Rodney, Malcolm X, etc. Students will complete a research paper on a topic of their own choosing related to Black internationalism in the twentieth century.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Schrader, Stuart Laurence
  • Room: Krieger Laverty
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-AP, INST-CP

Social Policy Seminar
AS.360.401 (01)

This course is designed for students who have completed either the Baltimore intensive semester of the Social Policy Minor. The students will make presentations and pursue joint projects based on what they have learned during the intensive semesters concerning key social policy issues.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Lieberman, Robert C
  • Room: Maryland 201
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.230.101 (04)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMCalder, RyanMergenthaler 111
AS.230.101 (02)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMCalder, RyanMergenthaler 111
AS.190.300 (01)Racial Inequality, Policy and Politics in the USTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMWeaver, VeslaHodson 311
AS.191.303 (01)Critical Race Theory, Law, and Criminal JusticeMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMSchrader, Stuart LaurenceKrieger LavertyPOLI-AP, POLI-PT, INST-AP, INST-PT, SPOL-UL
AS.230.101 (03)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMCalder, RyanMergenthaler 111
AS.230.101 (05)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMCalder, RyanMergenthaler 111
AS.230.101 (06)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMCalder, RyanMergenthaler 111
AS.230.101 (07)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMCalder, RyanMergenthaler 111
AS.230.101 (01)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMCalder, RyanMergenthaler 111
AS.230.101 (08)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMCalder, RyanMergenthaler 111
AS.230.150 (01)Issues in International DevelopmentF 3:00PM - 5:30PMAgarwala, RinaHodson 303
AS.230.202 (01)Research Methods for the Social SciencesMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMHao, LingxinHodson 211
AS.230.322 (01)Quantitative Research PracticumTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMBurdick-Will, JuliaAmes 218
AS.230.335 (01)Medical HumanitarianismMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMNaveh Benjamin, IlilGilman 377INST-IR, MSCH-HUM
AS.230.306 (01)Plagues, Power, and Social ControlT 3:00PM - 5:30PMWhite, Alexandre Ilani ReinShaffer 304INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.230.238 (01)Beyond the Wall: The Political Economy of the US and MexicoMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMThornton, ChristyGilman 134INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP, INST-ECON
AS.230.323 (01)Qualitative Research PracticumTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMAmen Strayhorn, Kali-ahsetMattin Center 162CSC-CE
AS.230.341 (04)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PMAgree, EmilyAmes 234PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL
AS.230.341 (03)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PMAgree, EmilyAmes 234PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL
AS.230.367 (01)Islamic FinanceM 3:00PM - 5:30PMCalder, RyanGilman 400INST-ECON, ISLM-ISLMST
AS.230.337 (01)Global Crises: Past and PresentTh 3:00PM - 5:30PMSilver, Beverly JudithShaffer 300INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-ECON
AS.230.202 (02)Research Methods for the Social SciencesMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMHao, LingxinHodson 211
AS.230.352 (01)Chinese Diaspora: Networks and IdentityTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKuo, Huei-YingBloomberg 178INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP
AS.230.357 (01)Baltimore and BeyondT 4:00PM - 6:30PMDeluca, StefanieAbel Wolman House 100SPOL-UL
AS.230.341 (02)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PMAgree, EmilyAmes 234PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL
AS.230.216 (01)Disability and SocietyW 3:00PM - 5:30PMAgree, EmilyKrieger 302
AS.230.341 (01)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PMAgree, EmilyAmes 234PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL
AS.230.378 (01)Refugees, Human Rights, and SovereigntyTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMNaveh Benjamin, IlilKrieger 300INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.230.244 (01)Race and Ethnicity in American SocietyTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMGreif, MeredithGilman 413INST-AP
AS.230.388 (01)Sociology of the FamilyTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMCherlin, Andrew JMattin Center 162
AS.310.230 (01)Chinese Politics and SocietyTh 4:00PM - 6:30PMHe, GaochaoGilman 313INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.230.440 (01)Port Cities and Historical Capitalism in Maritime AsiaM 1:30PM - 4:00PMKuo, Huei-YingShriver Hall 104INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.310.340 (01)Development and Social Change in Rural ChinaW 3:00PM - 5:30PMHe, GaochaoKrieger 180INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, INST-CP
AS.230.397 (01)The Political Economy of Drugs and Drug WarsMW 4:30PM - 5:20PMThornton, ChristyGilman 134INST-ECON, INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.230.393 (01)Global Health and Human RightsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMNaveh Benjamin, IlilGilman 377INST-IR
AS.230.370 (01)Housing and Homelessness in the United StatesTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMGreif, MeredithGilman 134INST-AP, SPOL-UL
AS.362.315 (01)Black Against EmpireMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMSchrader, Stuart LaurenceKrieger LavertyINST-GLOBAL, INST-AP, INST-CP
AS.360.401 (01)Social Policy SeminarM 1:30PM - 4:00PMLieberman, Robert CMaryland 201