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Alexandre White

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“Imperial Transformations and Racial Orders: The World Health Organization and the Management of Infectious Disease”
Alexandre White is a Johns Hopkins University Provost’s Postdoctoral Fellow (PPF) for the period July 1, 2018 to June 30, 2019.  Alexandre White was chosen as a PPF recipient as part of the second annual competition.  His research sits at the intersections of the sociology of race, postcolonial theory and medical sociology, and aims to critically interrogate the mechanisms through which racialized knowledge and logics are operationalized and reproduced within the field of medicine and global discourses surrounding epidemic spread and disease prevention.

21st Century Neighborhoods Symposium

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Reinventing Our Communities (ROC) is going on the road! Join us for Reinventing Our Communities: Investing in Opportunity, Monday, October 1, through Wednesday, October 3, 2018, at the Hilton Baltimore.
Investing in people, places, and communities can produce positive returns and increase access to resources that create economic growth and prosperity. Check out the conference agenda to see the lineup of plenaries and workshops in which you will learn about effective strategies for building and mobilizing four forms of capital — financial, human, physical, and social — to create opportunity in your communities.
This year’s event is cosponsored by the Federal Reserve Banks of  Philadelphia and  Richmond, and Johns Hopkins 21st Century Cities Initiative (21CC). 21CC is incorporating its annual gathering on cities, the 21st Century Neighborhoods Symposium, held in the fall in Baltimore, into this year’s Reinventing Our Communities conference.
Cosponsors also include the Federal Reserve Banks of Atlanta, Chicago, Cleveland, Minneapolis, New York, and St. Louis, the Annie E. Casey Foundation,  Enterprise Community Partners, FHLBank Pittsburgh, NeighborWorks America, and the Joseph and Harvey Meyerhoff Family Charitable Funds.
ROC conferences, organized by the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia since 2004, have become must-attend biennial events for experts, thought leaders, and policymakers in community development to discuss strategies to “reinvent America’s communities.”
To follow us on Twitter and get conference updates, use @philfedcomdev #Reinventing18

Adrian Raftery, “Bayesian Population Projections with Migration Uncertainty”

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Bayesian Population Projections with Migration Uncertainty
Boeing International Professor of Statistics and Sociology, University of Washington
Dr. Raftery is also a faculty affiliate of the Center for Statistics and the Social Sciences and the Center for Studies in Demography and Ecology. He works on the development of new statistical methods for the social, environmental and health sciences. He is an elected member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences.

Information Session: The Social Policy Minor & Policy Fellowship Semester

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Please join us on Thursday, October 11 from 5:30 – 6:30PM in Mergenthaler 526.
The Social Policy Minor admits 15 students per year into its program.  Students study policies and practices that promote the economic and social well-being of individuals, families and communities in areas such as poverty and inequality, housing, education, and health.
The heart of the Minor is its Policy Fellowship Semester, usually taken in the spring of junior year.  Students take 5 specially designed courses in aspects of social policy and do an internship in Baltimore or Washington DC for 15 to 20 hours.
Prerequisite:  360.247, Introduction to Social Policy and Inequality: Baltimore and Beyond.
Graduates of the program have taken staff positions in Congress and in Washington DC policy and research organizations, as well as in Baltimore nonprofit service organizations.
Graduates have gone on to graduate studies in law, medicine, and  public health.
Students with all majors are welcome to apply.
For more information, contact Prof. Andrew Cherlin, cherlin@jhu.edu.

Even a Moon Shot Needs a Flight Plan: Genetics and Ethics in the Obama Administration

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Alondra Nelson is president of the Social Science Research Council and professor of sociology at Columbia University. A scholar of science, technology, and social inequality, she is the author most recently of The Social Life of DNA: Race, Reparations, and Reconciliation after the Genome. Her publications also include Body and Soul: The Black Panther Party and the Fight against Medical Discrimination; Genetics and the Unsettled Past: The Collision of DNA, Race, and History; and Technicolor: Race, Technology, and Everyday Life.

Katrina McDonald Book Talk

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Embracing Sisterhood is a thought-provoking examination of black women’s intersecting challenges, tensions, and issues of class in the twenty-first century.  In this purported era of high-profile, mega-successful black women and growing socioeconomic diversity, Embracing Sisterhood seeks to determine where contemporary black women’s ideas of black womanhood and sisterhood merge with social class.
Katrina Bell McDonald is Associate Professor of Sociology at Johns Hopkins University, Co-director of the Center for Africana Studies at the Johns Hopkins University and an Associate of the Hopkins Population Center.
Books will be available for purchase at a book signing after the event.
Writers LIVE programs are supported in part by a bequest from The Miss Howard Hubbard Adult Programming Fund.
Tuesday, January 15 at 6:30pm
Central Library, African American Department
400 Cathedral Street, Baltimore, MD 21201

Follow the Carbon: Housing Movements and Carbon Emissions in the 21st Century City

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Co-sponsored with Latin America in a Globalizing World
Daniel Aldana Cohen’s dissertation research explores the interplay of climate politics and social movement protest in global cities, especially São Paulo, New York, and London.
 Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania and a member of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey (2018-19).

An Uneasy Alliance: Juggling Aid and Human Rights Advocacy in an Israeli/Palestinian Medical NGO

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Ilil Benjamin
Lecturer, Department of Sociology, JHU

The Dictatorship of Capital: Urban Redevelopment and the Question of Violence in Post-Authoritarian South Korea

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Co-Sponsored with Racism, Immigration, and Citizenship
Professor Hae Yeon Choo’s research centers on gender, transnational migration, and citizenship to examine global social inequality. In her empirical and theoretical work, she employs an intersectional approach to social inequalities, integrating gender, race, and class in her analyses. This approach provided the foundation for an article published in Sociological Theory in 2010 (with Myra Marx Ferree), which offers an intersectional methodology to address the complex dimensions of analysis in sociological research. She has also translated Patricia Hill Collins’s Black Feminist Thought into Korean.

The Racial Disparity of Demand: Rethinking the Narrative of Police Interactions

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Peter Moskos, a former Baltimore City Police Officer, is an associate professor in the Department of Law, Police Science, and Criminal Justice Administration at John Jay College of Criminal Justice. A Harvard and Princeton trained sociologist, Moskos studies people the old-fashioned way: He talks to them.
In addition to his primary duties at John Jay College, Moskos is a faculty member in CUNY’s Doctoral Programs in Sociology, teaches introductory police classes at LaGuardia Community College in Queens, and is a Senior Fellow of the Yale Urban Ethnography Project.
Moskos’s three books — Cop in the Hood, In Defense of Flogging, and Greek Americans — have won high praise and earned him recognition as one of Atlantic Magazine’s “Brave Thinkers” of the year. He has also published in the Washington Post, Washington Monthly, the New York Times, CNN, Macleans, Pacific Standard, Slate, The Chronicle of Higher Education, and his blog, copinthehood.com.