Courses

Please consult the online course catalog for complete course information.

If you would like to see our current offerings, please see the department’s listing on the Student Information Services (SIS) website.

AS.230.599 - Independent Study

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Silver, Beverly Judith
Term: Summer 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.599 - Independent Study

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Nelson, Timothy
Term: Summer 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.597 - Independent Research

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Hao, Lingxin
Term: Summer 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.597 - Independent Research

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Silver, Beverly Judith
Term: Summer 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.599 - Independent Study

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Staff
Term: Summer 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.598 - Summer Internship

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: McDonald, Katrina Bell
Term: Summer 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.599 - Independent Study

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Staff
Term: Summer 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.598 - Summer Internship

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Cherlin, Andrew J
Term: Summer 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.101 - Introduction to Sociology

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Agree, Emily, Calder, Ryan
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.230.202 - Research Methods for the Social Sciences

The purpose of this course is to provide a sound introduction to the overall process of research and the specific research methods most frequently used by sociologists and other social scientists. Required for Sociology majors and IS GSCD track students.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Hao, Lingxin
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: T 3:00PM - 4:40PM, Th 3:00PM - 3:50PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.230.205 - Introduction to Social Statistics

This course will introduce students to the application of statistical techniques commonly used in sociological analysis. Topics include measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability theory, confidence intervals, chi-square, anova, and regression analysis. Hands-on computer experience with statistical software and analysis of data from various fields of social research. Special Note: Required for IS GSCD track students.

Credits: 4.00
Instructor: Grigg, Jeffrey Alexander
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
Status: Closed

AS.230.150 - Issues in International Development

This course will provide an undergraduate level introduction to the study and practice, as well as the successes and failures, of international development. Students will be introduced to the various theoretical frameworks used to explain underdevelopment. Students will also explore the practice of development since the 1950s by examining specific strategies employed in Latin America, South Asia, East Asia, and Africa. Using a variety of country-specific case studies, students will have the opportunity to apply the theoretical and practical frameworks learned in the class to assess the successes and failures of real-life cases.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Levien, Michael
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.230.202 - Research Methods for the Social Sciences

The purpose of this course is to provide a sound introduction to the overall process of research and the specific research methods most frequently used by sociologists and other social scientists. Required for Sociology majors and IS GSCD track students.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Hao, Lingxin
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: T 3:00PM - 4:40PM, Th 3:00PM - 3:50PM
Status: Canceled

AS.230.109 - Freshman Seminar: Hot Topics in Education

This course examines current school reform initiatives and the controversies surrounding them through a sociological lens. Freshmen Only

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Burdick-Will, Julia
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.230.150 - Issues in International Development

This course will provide an undergraduate level introduction to the study and practice, as well as the successes and failures, of international development. Students will be introduced to the various theoretical frameworks used to explain underdevelopment. Students will also explore the practice of development since the 1950s by examining specific strategies employed in Latin America, South Asia, East Asia, and Africa. Using a variety of country-specific case studies, students will have the opportunity to apply the theoretical and practical frameworks learned in the class to assess the successes and failures of real-life cases.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Levien, Michael
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.230.205 - Introduction to Social Statistics

This course will introduce students to the application of statistical techniques commonly used in sociological analysis. Topics include measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability theory, confidence intervals, chi-square, anova, and regression analysis. Hands-on computer experience with statistical software and analysis of data from various fields of social research. Special Note: Required for IS GSCD track students.

Credits: 4.00
Instructor: Grigg, Jeffrey Alexander
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.230.101 - Introduction to Sociology

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Agree, Emily, Calder, Ryan
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.230.195 - Exploring Baltimore: An Introduction to Urban Studies

This course will introduce students to the field of urban studies and Baltimore itself. Students will learn data collection and analysis methods used in the social sciences. Students will discuss relevant research published in urban studies by Johns Hopkins faculty and other experts in the field. Students will also gain an introduction to their adopted home, Baltimore, by collecting data and conducting field observations in different neighborhoods.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Reese, Michael Joseph, Jr.
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
Status: Open

AS.230.213 - Social Theory

This course will focus on three classical theorists whose ideas have greatly influenced the ways we study and understand society: Karl Marx, Max Weber, and Emile Durkheim. Much of the course is devoted to applying these theories to analyze current social issues, especially those involving social inequality, conflict, cohesion, and change.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Andreas, Joel
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.230.221 - Global Social Change

This course introduces students to issues of global social change, with a particular focus on the challenges of international development and the contemporary globalization process. Specific themes include world income inequality and global poverty, the rise of supranational organizations (e.g. WTO and EU) and their relations with sovereign states, anti-globalization activism, the rise of China and India in the global economy, and the origins as well as consequences of the current global economic crisis, among others. Lectures will be aided by documentary films and other multi-media materials. Special Note: Fulfills Economics requirement for IS GSCD track students only. Formerly offered as AS 230.353. Students who took AS.230.353 cannot take AS.230.221.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Hung, Ho-Fung
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.230.500 - Independent Study

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Calder, Ryan
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.370 - Housing and Homelessness in the United States

This course will examine the role of housing, or the absence thereof, in shaping quality of life. It will explore the consequences of the places in which we live and how we are housed. Consideration will be given to overcrowding, affordability, accessibility, and past and existing housing policies and their influence on society. Special attention will be given to the problem of homelessness.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Greif, Meredith
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.230.341 - Sociology of Health and Illness

This course introduces students to medical sociology, which is the application of the sociological perspective to health and health care. Major topics include stress, social epidemiology, and the social organization of health care.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Agree, Emily
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: M 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.230.501 - Research Assistantship

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Morgan, Stephen L
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.500 - Independent Study

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Kuo, Huei-Ying
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.363 - Sociology of Dispossession

The “grabbing” of land and natural resources has, in recent years, generated widespread political conflict across the world and put dispossession on the agenda of academics and policy-makers. Nevertheless, compared to other social relations of power, land dispossession has not been central to scholarly or public understandings of capitalism, the state, development, or politics. In this class, we will collectively explore the nascent field that we might call the sociology of dispossession. We will examine existing theories of dispossession, and proceed to challenge, reconstruct or supplant those theories as we consider a wide range of historical examples of dispossession from the English Enclosures and colonial plunder to contemporary urban redevelopment and rural land grabs. This is a reading- and writing-intensive seminar.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Levien, Michael
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Open

AS.230.500 - Independent Study

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Agree, Emily
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.501 - Research Assistantship

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Hung, Ho-Fung
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.501 - Research Assistantship

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Silver, Beverly Judith
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.393 - Global Health and Human Rights

Is access to healthcare a fundamental human right? If so, then which global actors are obligated to provide healthcare to whom, and for how long? How do meanings of health and illness vary across time and place? And finally, how are human rights principles translated into frontline practice in order to promote well-being? This course takes a critical interdisciplinary approach to these questions through a series of global case studies ranging from humanitarian aid in post-tsunami Sri Lanka to anti-FGM (female genital mutilation) campaigns in Ghana. How do international NGOs, UN bodies, and governments collaborate (or compete) to distribute healthcare in places beset by dire resource shortages? Do human rights principles carry legal weight across borders, and if so, could access to healthcare services and essential medicines be litigated in order to compel governments to provide it? And finally, what cultural assumptions do human rights discourses carry with them, and what happens if rights-based approaches are poorly received by recipient populations? Moving beyond the basic principle of healthcare as a human right, this course aims to bring this idea’s history and politics into focus by offering an in-depth exploration of its ethics and implementation.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Naveh Benjamin, Ilil
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.230.394 - Social Statistics

The application of statistical techniques commonly used in sociological analysis. Topics include measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability theory, confidence intervals, chi-square, anova, and regression analysis. Hands-on computer experience with statistical software and analysis of data from various fields of social research.

Credits: 4.00
Instructor: Staff
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
Status: Approval Required

AS.230.335 - Medical Humanitarianism

Humanitarian organizations play life-preserving roles in global conflicts, and have front-row views of disasters ranging from the 2010 Haiti earthquake to the 2011 Fukushima tsunami in Japan. Yet even while they provide vital assistance to millions of people in crisis, such organizations are beset by important paradoxes that hinder their capacity to create sustainable interventions. They work to fill long-lasting needs, but are prone to moving quickly from one site to the next in search of the latest emergency. They strive to be apolitical, yet are invariably influenced by the geopolitical agendas of global powers. How do such contradictions arise, and what is their impact upon millions of aid recipients around the world? Drawing on case studies from South Sudan to Haiti, this course addresses these contradictions by exploring how and why medical aid organizations attempt, and sometimes fail, to reconcile short-term goals, such as immediate life-saving, with long-term missions, such as public health programs and conflict resolution initiatives.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Naveh Benjamin, Ilil
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.230.369 - Sociology in Economic Life

This course discusses how geopolitics, technology as well as social differentiation (such as race, class and gender) shape the structure of economic actions. Special attention will be paid to patterns of state-business relationship, labor processes, migrant economy, globalization and international division of labor.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Kuo, Huei-Ying
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
Status: Open

AS.230.502 - Senior Honors Program

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Agree, Emily
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.316 - African American Family

This course is an examination of sociological theories and studies of African-American families and an overview of the major issues confronting African-American family life. The contemporary conditions of black families are explored, as well as the historical events that have influenced the family patterns we currently observe. Special attention will be given to social policies that have evolved as a result of the prominence of any one perspective at a given point in time.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: McDonald, Katrina Bell
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: M 3:00PM - 5:30PM
Status: Open

AS.230.397 - The Political Economy of Drugs and Drug Wars

In the United States, we spend more than $100 billion annually on illegal drugs—and the government spends more than $50 billion a year to combat their sale and use. These statistics raise important and complicated social questions. This course will examine the production, sale, use, and control of illegal drugs from a historical and sociological perspective. We will have three objectives: to understand the social construction of drug use and illegality in the United States and other rich countries; to uncover the political and economic consequences of drug trafficking in those countries that produce drugs, particularly in Latin America; and to examine the political economy of drug control through the so-called War on Drugs, both domestically and internationally.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Thornton, Christy
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.230.323 - Qualitative Research Practicum

This course provides "hands on" research experience applying sociological research tools and a sociological perspective to problems of substance. Qualitative observational and/or interviewing methods will be emphasized. Students will design and carry out a research project and write a research report. This course fulfills the "research practicum" requirement for the Sociology major.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: McDonald, Katrina Bell
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: W 3:00PM - 5:30PM
Status: Canceled

AS.230.394 - Social Statistics

The application of statistical techniques commonly used in sociological analysis. Topics include measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability theory, confidence intervals, chi-square, anova, and regression analysis. Hands-on computer experience with statistical software and analysis of data from various fields of social research.

Credits: 4.00
Instructor: Staff
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
Status: Approval Required

AS.230.313 - Space, Place, Poverty & Race: Sociological Perspectives on Neighborhoods & Public Housing

Is a neighborhood just a grouping of individuals living in the same place, or do neighborhoods have collective meanings and impacts on children and families? We will capitalize on research methodologies used to define and describe neighborhoods and their effects on economic and educational outcomes. These include case studies, census data, surveys, quasi/experimental data. Focus is on how research measures neighborhood effects and incorporates community level processes into models of social causation (e.g., social capital/control, community efficacy, civic engagement). Also examined: patterns in residential mobility, segregation, and preferences within black and white populations; development of housing policy in the U.S.; programs to determine how neighborhoods affect issues of social importance. Statistics and public policy background is helpful but not required.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Deluca, Stefanie
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.230.500 - Independent Study

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Morgan, Stephen L
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.501 - Research Assistantship

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Burdick-Will, Julia
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.500 - Independent Study

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Staff
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.385 - Schooling, Racial Inequality and Public Policy in America

After examining alternative explanations for why individuals obtain different amounts and types of educational training, the course focuses on how an individual’s family background and race affect his or her trajectory through the educational system. The course covers the specific challenges that have confronted urban schooling in America since the 1960s, including the classic literature on the effects of school and community resources on student achievement as well as the development and later evaluation of school desegregation policies. The course also considers case studies of current policy debates in the US, such as housing segregation and school resegregation, voucher programs for school choice, and the motivation for and consequences of the establishment of state-mandated testing requirements. Throughout the course, emphasis is placed upon the alternative modes of inquiry and writing which opposing scholars, policymakers, and journalists use to address these contentious topics.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Morgan, Stephen L
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.230.500 - Independent Study

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Burdick-Will, Julia
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.501 - Research Assistantship

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Staff
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.341 - Sociology of Health and Illness

This course introduces students to medical sociology, which is the application of the sociological perspective to health and health care. Major topics include stress, social epidemiology, and the social organization of health care.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Agree, Emily
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: M 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.230.335 - Medical Humanitarianism

Humanitarian organizations play life-preserving roles in global conflicts, and have front-row views of disasters ranging from the 2010 Haiti earthquake to the 2011 Fukushima tsunami in Japan. Yet even while they provide vital assistance to millions of people in crisis, such organizations are beset by important paradoxes that hinder their capacity to create sustainable interventions. They work to fill long-lasting needs, but are prone to moving quickly from one site to the next in search of the latest emergency. They strive to be apolitical, yet are invariably influenced by the geopolitical agendas of global powers. How do such contradictions arise, and what is their impact upon millions of aid recipients around the world? Drawing on case studies from South Sudan to Haiti, this course addresses these contradictions by exploring how and why medical aid organizations attempt, and sometimes fail, to reconcile short-term goals, such as immediate life-saving, with long-term missions, such as public health programs and conflict resolution initiatives.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Naveh Benjamin, Ilil
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.230.228 - Colonialism in Asia and Its Contested Legacies

This course surveys the impacts of colonialism in East and Southeast Asia. Special attention will be paid to the social and economic development in British Singapore and Hong Kong as well as Japanese Korea and Taiwan. Topics include free-trade imperialism, colonial modernity, anticolonial movements, pan-Asianism, and post-war U.S. hegemony.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Kuo, Huei-Ying
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.230.500 - Independent Study

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Agarwala, Rina
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.351 - Capitalism, Development and Resistance in South Korea

This course examines the trajectory of capitalist development in South Korea (hereafter, Korea) in the twentieth and the early twenty-first centuries. We will examine debates around the political economy of development in Korea as well as class formation and social and labor protest. This course is designed to help students explore the dynamics of capitalist development and workers’ movements in Korea as a case of late development in the global South. The course also draws on theoretical perspectives and methodological tools from comparative and world-historical sociology to better understand the Korean case.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Kang, Minhyoung
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.230.500 - Independent Study

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Silver, Beverly Judith
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.500 - Independent Study

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Hung, Ho-Fung
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.502 - Senior Honors Program

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Agarwala, Rina
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.244 - Race and Ethnicity in American Society

Race and ethnicity have played a prominent role in American society and continue to do so, as demonstrated by interracial and interethnic gaps in economic and educational achievement, residence, political power, family structure, crime, and health. Using a sociological framework, we will explore the historical significance of race and its development as a social construction, assess the causes and consequences of intergroup inequalities and explore potential solutions.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Greif, Meredith
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.230.501 - Research Assistantship

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Agarwala, Rina
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.506 - Independent Research

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Morgan, Stephen L
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.502 - Senior Honors Program

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Staff
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.502 - Senior Honors Program

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Kuo, Huei-Ying
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.506 - Independent Research

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Silver, Beverly Judith
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.506 - Independent Research

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Agarwala, Rina
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.502 - Senior Honors Program

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Staff
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.506 - Independent Research

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Agree, Emily
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.501 - Research Assistantship

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Calder, Ryan
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.502 - Senior Honors Program

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Morgan, Stephen L
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.502 - Senior Honors Program

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Hung, Ho-Fung
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.506 - Independent Research

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Kuo, Huei-Ying
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.506 - Independent Research

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Staff
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.502 - Senior Honors Program

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Burdick-Will, Julia
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.501 - Research Assistantship

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Kuo, Huei-Ying
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.507 - Internship

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Staff
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.502 - Senior Honors Program

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Silver, Beverly Judith
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.506 - Independent Research

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Hung, Ho-Fung
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.506 - Independent Research

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Burdick-Will, Julia
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.362.314 - Police and Prisons in Comparative Perspective

This course will examine policing and prisons in the United States and beyond, with a focus on racial inequality. It will consist of two parts. First, we will explore the contemporary state of prisons and policing in the United States and look at debates around the rise of “mass incarceration” and aggressive forms of policing in the final third of the 20th century. Second, we will explore policing and prison in other parts of the globe in the contemporary moment, highlighting similarities and differences from the U.S. case. What can studying the instruments of social control in other societies reveal about our own? Students will develop an understanding of major trends, keywords, and debates in the literature on policing and prisons, with particular reference to race and racism.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Schrader, Stuart Laurence
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.362.160 - "Land, Labour and Environmental Rights and Struggles in Contemporary Africa".

‘Africa rising’ has become an influential, albeit contested, narrative used by institutions like the International Monetary Fund and World Economic Forum to describe the rapid economic growth in 21st century Africa. This rapid ‘economic growth has been accompanied by another type of ‘Africa Rising’ – a mushrooming of social protest and popular uprisings across the continent. The course will introduce important theoretical perspectives, debates, and examples to equip students to critically examine contemporary social dynamics through the interconnected themes of land, labor and environmental rights and struggles that have gripped the African continent. What has given rise to these awakenings? Who are the actors involved in these actions? What are their demands and strategies? What lessons does it hold for social movement theory and development more broadly? The first section focuses on land reclamation movements, the new wave of ‘land grabs’ and responses from below. The second section presents the role of labour movements and its intersection with popular uprisings. The third section considers responses from communities and movements to the ecological destruction and climate change.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Jacobs, Ricado Eduard
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
Status: Open

AS.230.507 - Internship

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Calder, Ryan
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.507 - Internship

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Agarwala, Rina
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.230.501 - Research Assistantship

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Agree, Emily
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.507 - Internship

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Burdick-Will, Julia
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.507 - Internship

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Hung, Ho-Fung
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.360.401 - Social Policy Seminar

This course is designed for students who have completed either the Baltimore intensive semester of the Social Policy Minor. The students will make presentations and pursue joint projects based on what they have learned during the intensive semesters concerning key social policy issues.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Teles, Steven Michael
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Open

AS.230.507 - Internship

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Kuo, Huei-Ying
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.506 - Independent Research

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Staff
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.502 - Senior Honors Program

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Calder, Ryan
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.506 - Independent Research

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Calder, Ryan
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.230.507 - Internship

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Morgan, Stephen L
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Open

AS.360.247 - Introduction to Social Policy: Baltimore and Beyond

This course will introduce students to basic concepts in economics, political science and sociology relevant to the study of social problems and the programs designed to remedy them. It will address the many inequalities in access to education and health care, unequal treatment in the criminal justice system, disparities in income and wealth, and differential access to political power. The focus will be on designing effective policies at the national and local level to address these pressing issues. This course is open to all students, but will be required for the new Social Policy Minor. The course is also recommended for students who are interested in law school, medical school, programs in public health, and graduate school in related social science fields. This course does not count as one of the required courses for the Economics major or minor, but it is required for the Social Policy Minor. Cross list with Sociology, Economics and Political Science. Freshman, Sophomore and Juniors only.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Deluca, Stefanie, Morgan, Barbara Anne, Schlozman, Daniel
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: Th 10:30AM - 11:45AM, T 10:30AM - 11:45AM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.230.507 - Internship

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Agree, Emily
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.230.507 - Internship

Credits: 1.00
Instructor: Silver, Beverly Judith
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings:
Status: Closed

AS.360.247 - Introduction to Social Policy: Baltimore and Beyond

This course will introduce students to basic concepts in economics, political science and sociology relevant to the study of social problems and the programs designed to remedy them. It will address the many inequalities in access to education and health care, unequal treatment in the criminal justice system, disparities in income and wealth, and differential access to political power. The focus will be on designing effective policies at the national and local level to address these pressing issues. This course is open to all students, but will be required for the new Social Policy Minor. The course is also recommended for students who are interested in law school, medical school, programs in public health, and graduate school in related social science fields. This course does not count as one of the required courses for the Economics major or minor, but it is required for the Social Policy Minor. Cross list with Sociology, Economics and Political Science. Freshman, Sophomore and Juniors only.

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Deluca, Stefanie, Morgan, Barbara Anne, Schlozman, Daniel
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: Th 10:30AM - 11:45AM, T 10:30AM - 11:45AM
Status: Waitlist Only

AS.310.402 - Labor Politics in China

This course explores the transformation of labor relations in China over the past century. It will cover the origins of the labor movement, the changes brought about by the 1949 Revolution, the industrial battles of the Cultural Revolution, the traumatic restructuring of state-owned enterprises over the past two decades, the rise of private enterprise and export-oriented industry, the conditions faced by migrant workers today, and recent developments in industrial relations and labor conflict. The course is designed for upper division undergraduates and graduate students. Cross-listed with Sociology and International Studies (CP).

Credits: 3.00
Instructor: Andreas, Joel
Term: Fall 2018
Meetings: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
Status: Open