Courses [Expand All]

Please consult the online course catalog for complete course information.

Course registration information can be found at https://isis.jhu.edu/classes/

230.101 (S) lntroductory Sociology  (3 Credits)

This course covers the basic concepts of sociology and applies these concepts to the analysis of human societies.

Instructor: Staff

230.109 (W) Freshman Seminar: Hot Topics in Education  (3 Credits)

This course examines current school reform initiatives and the controversies surrounding them through a sociological lens.

Freshmen Only

Instructor: Burdick-Will

230.114 (S) Labor and Globalization  (3 Credits)

Themes include the impact of global processes such as immigration and capital mobility on the nature of work and employment in different parts of the world, and how local protest has shaped global social change.

Instructor: Silver

230.123 (S) Trust and Altruism: Existence and Forms in Theory and Practice  (3 Credits)

Trust is often cited as necessary to the successful functioning of small groups, formal organizations, and democratic society.  Altruism is a concept that is debated regarding its very existence – whether there is a sociological, biological, or other basis for saying it exists.  Through interdisciplinary readings – primarily from sociology but also evolutionary biology, psychology, and philosophy – we will consider theories of trust and altruism, as well as claims about other mechanisms that can secure mutually beneficial cooperation.  Case studies from families, education, neighborhood ecology, and on-line communities are featured.

 

230.127 (S,W) Freshman Seminar: Social Interaction  (3 Credits)

This course introduces students to ways of seeing social interaction, from mundane acts like conversation and riding the bus to extraordinary events like riots, escape panics and battlefield atrocities. The course will employ a “hands on” approach in which students will DO and not just read about sociology. Locations in and around campus will serve as laboratories to observe (and instigate) interactions for analysis. Freshman Only.

Instructor: Nelson

230.147 (S) Introduction to Islam and Muslim Societies Since 1800  (3 Credits)

This course is an introduction to contemporary Islam and Muslim societies from approximately 1800 to the present. Key themes will include the colonial encounter, state formation and reform, revolution, Islamic revival, and globalization. Reflecting Islam’s status as a world religion, the course will touch on developments around the Muslim-majority world and in the West.

Instructor: Calder

230.150 (S) Issues in International Development  (3 Credits)

This course will provide an undergraduate level introduction to the study and practice, as well as the successes and failures, of international development. Students will be introduced to the various theoretical frameworks used to explain underdevelopment. Students will also explore the practice of development since the 1950s by examining specific strategies employed in Latin America, South Asia, East Asia, and Africa. Using a variety of country-specific case studies, students will have the opportunity to apply the theoretical and practical frameworks learned in the class to assess the successes and failures of real-life cases. Fufills Economics requirement for GSCD track students only. Cross listed with International Studies (IR). Freshmen and sophomores only.

Instructor: Levien

230.166 (S) Chinese Migration in Modern World History, 1500s-2000s  (3 Credits)

This interdisciplinary course applies theories of economic sociology to examine the effects of Chinese overseas migration on modern world economy from the sixteenth century to the contemporary era. It examines the contribution of overseas Chinese to the development of capitalism in the following junctures: the East-West economic integration in the pre-modern era, China’s modern transformation after the Opium War (1839-1842), the making of US national economy in the early twentieth century, as well as the postwar economic miracles in the Pacific Rim, among others.

Instructor: Kuo

230.175 (S,W) Chinese Revolutions  (3 Credits)

This course introduces the origins, operation and impacts of five major revolutions in modern China between 1850 and 1950. These include the Taiping Rebellion, the republican revolutions, federalist and southern automatic movements, labor strikes as well as peasant rebellions. It draws on the existing historiography that examines China’s transition from an empire to a republic, impacts of western and Japanese influences to China, as well as the continuity and change of Chinese social organizations.

Cross list with International Studies and East Asian Studies. Fulfills IS History requirement.

Instructor: Kuo

230.202 (S,W) Research Methods for the Social Sciences  (3 Credits)

The purpose of this course is to provide a sound introduction to the overall process of research and the specific research methods most frequently used by sociologists and other social scientists.

Required for IS GSCD track students.

Instructor: Hao

230.203 (S) Introduction to Latin American Societies  (3 Credits)

This course is designed as an introduction to Latin America’s societies for beginners, providing a survey of Latin America through its historical, economic, social, and political dimensions. We will analyze the pre-Columbian civilizations and the legacy of colonialism to understand the origins of the multiethnic societies and then focus on the contemporary development. For the first part of the semester we are going to analyze the process chronologically, the second part the course is organized thematically. We focus on class structure, race, ethnicity and social movements. This course will offer background information to build a solid foundation for further specialization in a region or a theme.

Instructor: Heydt-Coca

230.205 (S,Q) Introduction to Social Statistics  (4 Credits)

This course will introduce students to the application of statistical techniques commonly used in sociological analysis. Topics include measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability theory, confidence intervals, chi-square, ANOVA, and regression analysis. Hands-on computer experience with statistical software and analysis of data from various fields of social research.

Instructor: McDonald, Greif

230.208 (S) Introduction to Race and Ethnicity  (3 Credits)

This course offers an historical overview of race and ethnicity in American society, and the processes that have led to ethnic and racial boundaries.  We explore the social dynamics of racial/ethnic hostility and racial/ethnic protest movements.  In addition, we examine how race and ethnicity have been used to justify segregation, domination and genocide, but also to create a sense of community, shared responsibility and belonging.

Cross-listed with Africana Studies

Instructor: McDonald

230.213 (S,W) Social Theory  (3 Credits)

This course provides an introduction to classical sociological theories (with an emphasis on Marx, Weber, and Durkheim). Contemporary theoretical perspectives on social inequality, conflict, and social change are also explored. Emphasis is placed on understanding the theoretical constructs as well as on applying them in the analysis of current social issues.

Instructor: Andreas

230.221 (W) Global Social Change  (3 Credits)

This course introduces students to issues of global social change, with a particular focus on the challenges of international development and the contemporary globalization process. Specific themes include world income inequality and global poverty, the rise of supranational organizations (e.g. WTO and EU) and their relations with sovereign states, anti-globalization activism, the rise of China and India in the global economy, and the origins as well as consequences of the current global economic crisis, among others. Lectures will be aided by documentary films and other multi-media materials.

Instructor: Hung

230.223 Housing and Homelessness in the United States  (3 Credits)

This course will examine the role of housing, or the absence thereof, in shaping quality of life. It will explore the consequences of the places in which we live and how we are housed. Consideration will be given to overcrowding, affordability, accessibility, and past and existing housing policies and their influence on society. Special attention will be given to the problem of homelessness.

Instructor: Greif

230.225 (S) Population, Health and Development  (3 Credits)

This course will cover the major world population changes in the past century as well as the contemporary situation and projections for this century. Topics include rapid population growth, the historical and continuing decline of death and birth rates, the mortality transition, increases in contraceptive use, population aging, urbanization, population and the environment and the demographic effects of HIV/AIDS.

Instructor: Becker

230.228 (S) Colonialism in Asia and Its Contested Legacies  (3 Credits)

This seminar examines the theories and historiography of colonialism in Asia, with special focus on the development of British Straits Settlements and Hong Kong as well as Japanese Taiwan. We will review the competing discourses about the impact of colonial dominations in these areas from the 1800s to the present-day. In the beginning of the era, the British built up the economic linkage between Hong Kong and Penang, Malacca as well as Singapore to sustain its dominance throughout the “Far East.” In the middle of the period, the expanding Japanese empire developed Taiwan as a footstep to compete with the British interests in South China and Southeast Asia. Hong Kong and the Straits Settlements, especially Singapore, became the contested terrain where two colonial powers vied for their influences in the region. The competition was not only about trade, but about the construction of a new East Asian regional order after the end of the Chinese hegemony. In the end of the period, the intervention of the US power in postwar Asia facilitated the retreat of the colonial establishments, British and Japanese ones included. The course that compares the colonial establishments and discourses on colonial legacies among the three areas points out that colonialism constituted an inalienable part of Asian history.

Cross listed International Studies (CP) and East Asian Studies.

Fufills History requirement for IS GSCD track students only.

Instructor: Kuo

230.244 (S) Race and Ethnicity in American Society  (3 Credits)

Race and ethnicity have played a prominent role in American society and continue to do so, as demonstrated by interracial and interethnic gaps in economic and educational achievement, residence, political power, family structure, crime, and health. Using a sociological framework, we will explore the the historical significance of race and its development as a social construction, assess the causes and consequences of intergroup inequalities and explore potential solutions.

Instructor: Greif

230.255 (S) Men and Women in Society  (3 Credits)

This course will explore what it means to be male or female through academic writings, fiction, and film. It will examine how genders are defined by individuals, cultures, and institutions, and how those meanings shape everyday life for men and women.   Power, inequality, and intersections with race-ethnicity, class, and sexuality will be a primary focus. Theories of gender addressed will include those related to masculinity, social psychology, feminism, and intersectionality.  Though the course will primarily consider the United States, gender in other countries and cultures will also be addressed.

Cross-listed with WGS.

Instructor: McDonald

230.260 (S) Political Sociology  (3 Credits)

This course explores the interaction between political power and social forces in macro-comparative and international perspectives, focusing on how political institutions (such as states, political parties, and international governing bodies) are shaped by actions of different social groups (such as classes, ethnic groups, social movements), and vice versa. The class will cover the historical emergence of sovereign nation-state as the most salient political organization across the world, as well as its evolution into the form as we know it today. The class will also discuss the array of challenges that modern nation-states are facing under globalization and restructuring of world order following the end of Cold War.

Instructor: Hung

230.265 (S) Research Tools & Technologies for the Social Sciences  (3 Credits)

This course will introduce students to a range of digital technologies that are critical for conducting social scientific research in the 21st century. Students will develop competency in the use of computer programs for statistical analysis, database management, the creation of maps and timelines, and the presentation of research reports. The research tools and technologies will be taught using examples from ongoing social science faculty research projects at Johns Hopkins on global inequality and international development and on the 2010-2012 global wave of social protest.

Required for IS GSCD track students.

Instructor: Karatasli / Staff

230.285 (S) Maritime East Asia  (3 Credits)

This course examines the transnational connections among merchants and migrants in the waters of East and Southeast Asia from a historical and comparative perspective. In this class, we will explore how diplomatic ties, trade and migration between the thirteenth and eighteenth centuries contribute to the making of cosmopolitan cities such as Quanzhou, Macau, Nagasaki, Fort Zeelandia (Formosa), Malacca, Singapore and Batavia. The course will also address the role that transnational trade and migration networks played in the incorporation of East and Southeast Asia into the Western-led capitalism in the nineteenth century. The course will close with an examination of how the legacies of the long-standing transnational maritime connections continue to shape contemporary inter-state competition and negotiation in the region. Key concepts to be introduced include tribute trade system, rice economy, pan-Asianism, and ASEAN free trade zone.

 

Cross listed with East Asia Studies. Fulfills History and Comparative Politics requirement for IS and GSCD track.

Instructor: Kuo

230.293 Immigration in the United States  (3 Credits)

This course examines patterns and consequences of immigration at the national, state, and local level. Special attention will be given to changing racial and ethnic relations in American gateway cities, immigrants’ economic and cultural assimilation, the plight of the second generation, the importance of immigration policy in shaping the experiences of migrant groups, and public opinion on immigration.

Instructor: Greif

230.305 (S) Poverty and Welfare Policy  (3 Credits)

Examines the scope, character, and causes of poverty, the major policies to address it, and the movement toward welfare reform. The roles of migration, race/ethnicity, and gender are considered.

Instructor: Cherlin

230.307 (S) Sociology of Latin America  (3 Credits)

This course will offer an overview of Latin America’s reality through its economic, social, political and cultural dimensions. Latin American development will be analyzed as a historical process determined by intertwined internal socioeconomic factors, however, within the constraints of the world economy.

Instructor: Heydt-Coca

230.310 (S,W) Becoming An Adult: Life Course Perspectives On School, Work, And Family Transitions  (3 Credits)

While students may already be personally familiar with the subject matter, the course examines the sociological and psychological dimensions of this demographically dense period known as the transition to adulthood. Emphasizes life course theories of human development through readings of empirical work on adolescence, the transition to college, early employment and early family formation. Attention is paid to the ways class, gender, race and nationality influence the pathways, choices and outcomes of young people.

Prerequisites:

A Statistics/Sociology background is helpful, but not required.

Instructor: DeLuca

230.312 (S,W) Education and Society  (3 Credits)

This course examines how educational institutions affect students’ skills, values, and social mobility across generations. Research is reviewed that compares educational institutions according to their formal and interpersonal structures.

Instructor: Staff

230.313 (S,W) Space, Place, Poverty and Race: Sociological Perspectives on Neighborhoods and Public Housing  (3 Credits)

Is a neighborhood just a grouping of individuals living in the same place, or do neighborhoods have collective meanings and impacts on children and families? We will capitalize on research methodologies used to define and describe neighborhoods and their effects on economic and educational outcomes. These include case studies, census data, surveys, quasi/experimental data. Focus is on how research measures neighborhood effects and incorporates community level processes into models of social causation (e.g. social capital/control, community efficacy, civic engagement). Also examined: patterns in residential mobility, segregation, and preferences within black and white populations; development of housing policy in the US; programs to determine how neighborhoods affect issues of social importance.

Prerequisites:

Statistics and public policy background is helpful but not required.

Instructor: DeLuca

230.314 (S) International Development  (3 Credits)

Recent trends in the global distribution of wealth, status and power will be analyzed in light of theories of national and international development. Special attention will be paid to the unevenness of development between and within the global North and South.

Instructor: Silver

230.316 (S) The African-American Family  (3 Credits)

This course is an examination of sociological theories and studies of African-American families and an overview of the major issues confronting African-American family life. The contemporary conditions of black families are explored, as well as the historical events that have influenced the family patterns we currently observe. Special attention will be given to social policies that have evolved as a result of the prominence of any one perspective at a given point in time.

Instructor: McDonald

230.317 (S,W) Sociology of Immigration  (3 Credits)

This course surveys sociological theories and research on immigration to the U.S. Theoretical approaches include theories of international migration, economic sociology, immigration, and assimilation. Research topics include the impact of U.S. immigration laws and policies on immigrant inflows and stocks, self-selection of immigrants, the impact of immigration on the native-born population and the U.S. labor market and economy, and the adaptation of the first and second generations.

Instructor: Hao

230.318 (S) State and Society Relations in Modern India  (3 Credits)

This course examines the complex, at times conflicting, relationship that has emerged between Indian seats of power from above and Indian expressions of society from below. Attention will be placed on the period between 1947 to the present.

Instructor: Agarwala

230.320 (S,W) Education and Inequality: Individual, Contextual, and Policy Perspectives  (3 Credits)

This course examines classic and current debates in the sociology of education. Topics covered include the function and purpose of school in modern society; inequality and social mobility (as affected by labor market returns to school and the institutional mechanisms that affect status, such as tracking); social interactions in the classroom and student achievement; racial differences in achievement: the effort vs. ability debate; schools as organizations in the larger societal context; the function of community colleges; and the school to work transition. The relevance of education research to policy-making and school reform is emphasized throughout the course.

Instructor: DeLuca

230.322 (S,Q) Quantitative Research Practicum  (3 Credits)

This course provides “hands on” research experience applying sociological research tools and a sociological perspective to problems of substance. Quantitative methods will be emphasized, as applied to census data, survey data and/or archival data. Students will design and carry out a research project and write a research report.

Prerequisites:

230.205 Introduction to Social Statistics

Instructor: Burdick-Will

230.323 (S,W,Q) Qualitative Research Practicum  (3 Credits)

This course provides “hands on” research experience applying sociological research tools and a sociological perspective to problems of substance. Qualitative observational and/or interviewing methods will be emphasized. Students will design and carry out a research project and write a research report.

Prerequisites:

230.205 Introduction to Social Statistics

Instructor: McDonald

230.324 (S) Gender and International Development  (3 Credits)

This course employs a comparative perspective to examine gendered impact of international development experiences policies. Students will discuss the historical evolution of the concept of gender has been constructed, conceptualized, and integrated into international development theory and practice. The course will also examine how greater attention to gender issues has challenged the assumptions behind the theoretical frameworks and the policy prescriptions guiding international development. In particular, we will examine structural theories of poverty reduction, individual theories of power and processes of stratification at the household and family level. Specific issue areas will include the globalization, class and work, political participation and social movements.

Instructor: Agarwala

230.325 (S) Global Social Change and Development Research Practicum  (3 Credits)

This course provides “hands on” research experience in the field of global social change and development.  Students will participate in a collaborative research project analyzing the causes and consequences of the recent upsurge of protest around the world in comparison with previous historical waves of social unrest.  The course fulfills the “research practicum” requirement for Sociology majors and is required for the GSCD track.

 

Prerequisites:

Pre-requisite: 230.265 Research Tools and Technologies OR permission of Instructor.

Instructor: Silver

230.332 (S) Race, Racism, and Racial Privilege  (3 Credits)

This course will examine the concepts of race, racism, racial privilege in contemporary America, and the West in general. Examples from other countries will be integrated as well. Historical contexts such as the colonialism, the Civil War and Reconstruction, the Civil Rights movement, and the post-Civil Rights era will help to provide an understanding of the social, political, economic, and cultural forces processes that have constructed and shaped the concepts of race and the racialized subject over time.

Instructor: McDonald

230.334 (S) The City in Time and Space: Historical Sociology of the Urban World  (3 Credits)

This course will cover the past and current developments of urbanization from a comparative historical perspective examining how cities operate in the increasingly connected and complex world of today. This is a Dean’s Teaching Fellowship Course

Instructor: Pasciuti

230.337 (S) Global Crises: Past and Present  (3 Credits)

This course compares the social, political and economic dynamics of the contemporary global crisis with that of earlier ones. Special attention will be paid to the Great Depressions of the 1930s and that of the late 19th century.

Instructor: Silver

230.341 (S) Sociology of Health and Illness  (3 Credits)

This course introduces students to medical sociology, which is the application of the sociological perspective to health and health care. Major topics include stress, social epidemiology, and the social organization of health care.

Cross-listed with Public Health Studies.

Instructor: Agree

230.343 (S) Political Sociology of Latin America  (3 Credits)

This course examines Latin American social structures with a special emphasis on issues of class, race and ethnicity, and contemporary social movements. The first part of the course is organized chronologically, beginning with an overview of pre-Columbian civilizations and the colonial legacies that gave rise to the multiethnic societies and the ethnic conflicts that characterize contemporary Latin America. The second part the course is organized thematically around issues of social structure, social classes, ethnicity and social movements.

Instructor: Heydt-Coca

230.346 (S) Contemporary Economic Sociology of Latin America  (3 Credits)

This course will offer an overview of Latin America’s economic reality as an intertwined process of economic and political domestic factors within the constraints of the world economy. Latin American development will be analyzed from a historical perspective. The first half of the semester the course will focus on the analysis of the economic developmental patterns starting in the middle of the 19thcentury to the populist era in the middle of the 20thcentury. In the second half of the semester, we will analyze in depth the contemporary neoliberal approach to development. Globalization is the force that drives economic, social and political processes in Latin America. The course will include case studies as well the social conflicts generated by the increasing polarization of the society. Students will be exposed to important sociological theories.

Cross-listed with the Program in Latin American Studies and International Studies. Fulfills Economics requirement for GSCD students only.

Instructor: Heydt-Coca

230.353 (S,W) Global Social Change  (3 Credits)

This course introduces students to issues of global social change, with a particular focus on the challenges of international development and the contemporary globalization process. Specific themes include world income inequality and global poverty, the rise of supranational organizations (e.g. WTO and EU) and their relations with sovereign states, anti-globalization activism, the rise of China and India in the global economy, and the origins as well as consequences of the current global economic crisis, among others. Lectures will be aided by documentary films and other multi-media materials.

Instructor: Hung

230.359 (S) Research Seminar on Global Social Protest  (3 Credits)

This course will be run as a collective research working group in which we will design and carry-out a research project on the current upsurge of social unrest around the world, from the Arab Spring to Occupy Wall Street, from the anti-austerity movements roiling Europe to the wave of workers’ protests taking place in China (including the factories where Ipods, Ipads and Iphones are assembled). We are currently witnessing an unusual worldwide clustering of major protest movements that will have important consequences for the shape of social and political institutions in the twenty-first century. We will design and carry-out a research project aimed at documenting the spread and characteristics of this global wave as well as exploring its causes and consequences. The first part of the class will be devoted to research design (determining our central research questions, hypotheses, and data collection procedures); the remainder of the class will be devoted to data collection and analysis. This course is suitable for students who are interested in an empirical and theoretical introduction to the dynamics of global social protest as well as in gaining hands-on research experience on a topic of contemporary social and political relevance.

Instructor: Silver & Karatasli

230.361 (S) Class and Culture  (3 Credits)

This course examines the intersection of social class and culture—both the popular culture of movies, TV, music, etc, and “culture” in the anthropological sense as the shared way of life of a people. The course is divided into three main sections: 1) concepts of class, culture and the ways in which they interact; 2) cultures of each major class within American society, beginning with the “Old” and “New Money” classes, the “New Class” of intelligentsia, the much-invoked Middle Classes, the shrinking Working Class, and continuing through the poverty-stricken Lower Classes; 3) issues of cultural consumption and production and their role in reproducing the class structure.

Instructor: Nelson

230.362 (S) Migration and Development  (3 Credits)

This course focuses on the relationship between international migration and development. The course first introduces theories of international migration, immigrant integration, and international development. Building on this foundation, we then examine how immigrants interact with their homeland and how sending country governments tap their diaspora t0 improve development outcomes.

Cross-listed with International Studies (CP, IR)

Fulfills Economics requirement for IS GSCD track students only.

Instructor: Agarwala / Hao

230.363 (W) Sociology of Dispossession  (3 Credits)

The “grabbing” of land and natural resources has, in recent years, generated widespread political conflict across the Global South and put dispossession on the agenda of academics and policy-makers. Nevertheless, compared to other social relations—such as labor exploitation—dispossession has not been central to social scientific understandings of capitalism, the state, “development,” or politics. In this class, we will collectively explore the nascent field that we might call the sociology of dispossession. We will begin with existing theoretical approaches to the problem, and then proceed to challenge, reconstruct or supplant those theories as we consider a wide range of historical examples of dispossession—including the English enclosures, colonial plunder, large dams, mining, water privatization, Special Economic Zones, transnational agricultural investments, conservation projects, and climate-induced displacement. Students will write weekly reading responses and a final paper.

Instructor: Levien

230.367 Islamic Finance  (3 Credits)

Today, Islamic finance is a global industry comprising nearly $2 trillion in assets, with hubs from Kuala Lumpur to Dubai to London. But half a century ago, nothing called “Islamic finance” existed. So where did Islamic finance come from? Why is it growing so fast? And what does it mean for finance to be Islamic? We discuss the ban on riba in the Quran and hadith, finance in early and medieval Islamic societies, petrodollars and the birth of Islamic banking in the 1970s, the rise of Islamic capital markets since 2000, contemporary shariah-compliant financial structures, and the constitution of piety through financial practice.

Instructor: Calder

230.369 Sociology in Economic Life  (3 Credits)

This course discusses how geopolitics, technology as well as social differentiation (such as race, class and gender) shape the structure of economic actions. Special attention will be paid to patterns of state-business relationship, labor processes, migrant economy, globalization and international division of labor.

Instructor: Kuo

230.371 (W) Sociology of Rock  (3 Credits)

This course examines the history and dynamics of rock music using key concepts and perspectives from sociology. The course is divided into four sections, each of which examines the phenomenon of rock music from a different analytical perspective. The first section on the origins of rock looks at the confluence of developments in post-war America, especially in terms of race, class and generational change, which produced this new musical form. The second section, “Rock as Cultural Production,” looks at all aspects of the rock “field,” not just artists and audiences but record labels, stores, DJ’s and radio stations, the music press and journalists, performance venues. The third section examines rock as a force for social change and protest from the 1960s until present, and the final section examines the performative aspects of rock as a kind of “interaction ritual” with its own microsociological dynamics.

Instructor: Nelson

230.373 Urban Sociology  (3 Credits)

This course will explore the growth and development of urban areas, and how cities create, influence, and perpetuate social and economic inequalities. It will explore how the community environment shapes social interactions, identities, and attitudes. Specific topics will include urban poverty, residential segregation, housing, crime, and health.

Instructor: Greif

230.375 (S,W) Nations, States and Boundaries  (3 Credits)

This course explores the historical origins and development of the modern global political order based on sovereign nation-states, the crisis of this order through the twentieth century, as well as the unraveling of this order at the turn of the twenty-first century. We will focus on how dominant political organizations in the changing world order (such as states, political parties, and transnational governing bodies) have been shaped by different social forces (such as classes and ethnic groups) and vice versa. Topics covered include rise and fall of modern nationalism, formation of regional and global governing structures, “civilizational” turn of global politics, waves of separatism and redrawing of nation’s boundaries after the Cold War, politics of immigration and citizenship, among others.

Instructor: Hung

230.376 (S) Sociology of Religion  (3 Credits)

This course addresses two primary questions: What social elements influence the varieties of religious belief, organization and action?  What are the consequences of these forms of religious expression for both individuals and for society? In addition to readings and exams, students will also attend two different religious services over the course of the semester.

Instructor: Nelson

230.377 Colonialism and Anti-Colonialism  (3 Credits)

This seminar examines the theories and historiography of colonialism and anti-colonial movements. It focuses on the establishment of the colonial division of labor, comparative colonialism, identity formation, and nationalism as well as anti-colonial movement.

Instructor: Kuo

230.379 Undergraduate Research Seminar  (3 Credits)

Seminar for Sociology students writing senior honor theses and conducting pre-approved independent research projects. 

Prerequisites:

Sociology majors only. Permission of instructor.

Instructor: Edin

230.380 (S,W) Poverty and Social Welfare Policy  (3 Credits)

This course examines the causes and consequences of U.S. poverty and explores strategies for addressing it, with some comparisons to other rich nations.  We cover the major theoretical explanations scholars have advanced to explain the persistence of poverty and inequality including labor markets, residential segregation, welfare policy, family structure, and the criminal justice system.  Within each topic area, students are introduced to contemporary policy approaches aimed at alleviating poverty, and evaluations of these approaches.

Instructor: Edin

230.381(W) Sociology of the Middle East and North Africa  (3 Credits)

This course takes a sociological approach to the contemporary Middle East and North Africa. Topics include urbanization and demographic change; rentier welfare states and the global political economy of oil; women in higher education and the labor force; the 2011 Arab Spring; conflict in Syria, Libya, and Yemen; Amazigh (Berber) identity in northwest Africa; Israel-Palestine; “Dubai, Inc.” and the sociology of migrant labor; neoliberal Islamic politics in Turkey; cinema and everyday life in Iran; conservative monarchy in Morocco and Saudi Arabia; and the role of the United States in the MENA region. Students will give presentations, write memos, and submit two papers. One aim of the course is to turn students into clear, polished academic writers and thinkers.

Instructor: Calder

230.388 (S) Sociology of the Family  (3 Credits)

This course includes a survey of sociological writings on the institution of the family and an examination of current issues and problems in family life.

Instructor: Cherlin

230.391 (S) Theories of International Development  (3 Credits)

Theories of political, economic, and social development. National development and the development of international systems. Although contemporary development and underdevelopment are emphasized, patterns of change in recent centuries are also examined in order to provide a comparative background for understanding recent developmental processes.

Instructor: Levien

230.395 Contemporary Social Theory  (3 Credits)

This course will examine how major social theorists of the 20th century advanced upon the “classical” social theories of Marx, Weber, and Durkheim. As they grappled with the historical events and social concerns of the 20th century—the Russian revolution and its degeneration into Stalinism, the failure of communist movements in the West, the rise and fall of fascism and Nazism, the consolidation of capitalist democracies and welfare states, the emergence of anti-colonial movements in the “Third World,” and the persistence of race, gender and sexuality as forms of domination—social theorists provided novel answers to classical questions of social theory: 1) what is the structure of modern society, how does it change, and how is it reproduced?; 2) what is the relation between social structures and ideas, knowledge, and subjectivity?; and 3) what are the conditions of possibility for human freedom? Theorists to be covered include Antonio Gramsci, Franz Fanon, W.E.B. Dubois, Georg Lukacs, Talcott Parsons, Herbert Marcuse, Jurgen Habermas, Louis Althusser, Pierre Bourdieu, Michel Foucault, Nancy Fraser, Patricia Hill Collins, Judith Butler, and Henri Lefebvre. In addition to understanding and comparing the theories, we will try to use them to understand contemporary societies.

Instructor: Levien

230.396 (S) Politics and Society  (3 Credits)

This seminar surveys texts that treat key problems of political sociology including the rise of the modern state, the relationship between political and economic power, the origins and nature of liberal democracy, the nation-state and nationalism, states and war, states and welfare, sources of authority, ideology and political contention, social movements, and social revolutions.

Instructor: Andreas

230.407 (S) Comparative Labor Movements Research Seminar  (3 Credits)

Research-oriented course on the dynamics of labor and social movements from a global and comparative-historical perspective.

Instructor: Silver

230.415 (S,W) Social Problems in Contemporary China  (3 Credits)

In this course we will examine contemporary Chinese society, looking at economic development, rural transformation, urbanization and migration, labor relations, changes in class structure and family organization, health care, environmental problems, governance, and popular protest. The course is designed for both graduate and undergraduate students. Undergraduates must have already completed a course about China at Hopkins and must obtain the instructor’s permission to join the class.

Instructor: Andreas

230.435 (S,W) The China Boom  (3 Credits)

This course addresses the origins, global impacts, and demise of China’s economic ascendancy as a world economic and political powerhouse at the turn of the twenty-first century. The course will cover the historical origins of the China boom and impacts of the boom on global political economic order. It will also address the social-political imbalances within China that contribute to the global financial crisis and recent slowdown of the Chinese economy. Particular topics include late imperial and Maoist legacies’ relation to contemporary economic growth, stages of China’s capitalist development, China’s outward investment in the developing world, formation and limits of US-China economic symbiosis, and China’s participation in global governance, among others.

Instructor: Hung

230.500 Independent Study

Instructor: Staff

230.501 Research Assistantship

230.502 Senior Honors Program

The requirement for the seminar is an honors thesis, due at the end of the second semester. The thesis may be a piece of research that the student does independently, or it may be a thoughtful and critical review of the work in a selected area.

Instructor: Staff

230.506 Independent Research

Instructor: Staff

230.508 Internship

230.509 Independent Study (Intersession)

230.635 PGSC Research Seminar  (3 Credits)

Working seminar focusing on new research in the field of comparative and world-historical sociology. 

Prerequisites:

Sociology graduate students or permission of instructor.

Instructor: Calder

360.247 Introduction to Social Policy and Inequality: Baltimore and Beyond  (3 Credits)

How can we address pressing social problems, such as inner city poverty, inequality in educational attainment among children from different backgrounds, and disparities in access to health care? Social policy refers to the programs, legislation and governmental activities that regulate access to important social, financial and institutional resources needed by members of a society to address these concerns.

Social policy also aims to reduce inequality, especially in the areas of education, health, income, housing, neighborhoods, and employment. The study of social policy is interdisciplinary, and this course will introduce students to the basic concepts in economics, political science, and sociology relevant to the study of social problems and the programs designed to remedy them. We will cover issues of national policy importance, as well as issues specifically affecting Baltimore City and the metropolitan region. This course is open to all students, but will be require d for the new Social Policy Minor. The course is also recommended for students who are interested in law school, medical school, programs in public health, and graduate school in related social science fields.

Instructor: DeLuca / Edin