Department News and Announcements Archive

2010-2011 Graduate Awards

Rachel Core was awarded a Fulbright Fellowship. Elizabeth Dayton received an American Educational Research Association (AERA) award. Sefika Kumral received a Middle East Research Competition (MERC) award. Ben Scully received a National Science Foundation (NSF) Dissertation Award entitled, ‘Class Formation and the Decline of Work’ for fieldwork in South Africa Christian Villenas was awarded the […]


Assessing Inequality

Providing basic foundations for measuring inequality from the perspective of distributional properties This monograph reviews a set of widely used summary inequality measures, and the lesser known relative distribution method provides the basic rationale behind each measure and discusses their interconnections. It also introduces model-based decomposition of inequality over time using quantile regression. This approach […]


The Marriage-Go-Round: The State of Marriage and the Family in America Today

The Marriage-Go-Round illuminates the shifting nature of America’s most cherished social institution and explains its striking differences from marriage in other Western countries. Andrew J. Cherlin’s three decades of study have shown him that marriage in America is a social and political battlefield in a way that it isn’t in other developed countries. Americans marry […]


China and the Transformation of Global Capitalism

With one of the world’s fastest-growing economies and a population quickly approaching two billion, China holds substantial sway over global financial, social, and cultural networks. This volume explains China’s economic rise and liberalization and assesses how this growth is reshaping the structure and dynamics of global capitalism in the twenty-first century. China has historically been […]


Rise of the Red Engineers: The Cultural Revolution and the Origins of China’s New Class

Rise of the Red Engineers explains the tumultuous origins of the class of technocratic officials who rule China today. In a fascinating account, author Joel Andreas chronicles how two mutually hostile groups—the poorly educated peasant revolutionaries who seized power in 1949 and China’s old educated elite—coalesced to form a new dominant class. After dispossessing the […]


Whatever Happened to Class? Reflections from South Asia

Class explains much in the differentiation of life chances and political dynamics in South Asia; scholarship from the region contributed much to class analysis. Yet class has lost its previous centrality as a way of understanding the world and how it changes. This outcome is puzzling; new configurations of global economic forces and policy have […]


Quantile Regression

Quantile Regression, the first book of Hao and Naiman’s two-book series, establishes the seldom recognized link between inequality studies and quantile regression models. Though separate methodological literature exists for each subject, the authors seek to explore the natural connections between this increasingly sought-after tool and research topics in the social sciences. Quantile regression as a […]


Color Lines, Country Lines: Race, Immigration, and Wealth Stratification in America

The growing number of immigrants living and working in America has become a controversial topic from classrooms to corporations and from kitchen tables to Capitol Hill. Many native-born Americans fear that competition from new arrivals will undermine the economic standing of low-skilled American workers, and that immigrants may not successfully integrate into the U.S. economy. […]